Title

Trends in Hospitalization for Hypertensive Emergency, and Relationship of End-Organ Damage With In-Hospital Mortality.

Publication/Presentation Date

4-20-2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There are no comprehensive guidelines on management of hypertensive emergency (HTNE) and complications. Despite advances in antihypertensive medications HTNE is accompanied with significant morbidity and mortality.

METHODS: We queried the 2002-2012 nationwide inpatient sample database to identify patients with HTNE. Trends in incidence of HTNE and in-hospital mortality were analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between end-organ complications and in-hospital mortality.

RESULTS: Between 2002 and 2012, 129,914 admissions were included. Six hundred and thirty (0.48%) patients died during their hospital stay. There was an increase in the number of HTNE admissions (9,511-15,479; Ptrend < 0.001) with concurrent reduction of in-hospital mortality (0.8-0.3%; Ptrend < 0.001) by the year 2012 compared to 2002. Patients who died during hospitalization were older, had longer length of stay, higher cost of stay, more comorbidities, and higher risk scores. Presence of acute cardiorespiratory failure [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 15.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 13.2-18.9], stroke or transient ischemia attack (TIA) (adjusted OR, 7.9; 95% CI, 6.3-9.9), chest pain (adjusted OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 4.4-7.7), stroke/TIA (adjusted OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 4.5-7.7), and aortic dissection (adjusted OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.8-12.4) were most predictive of higher in-hospital mortality in addition to factors such as age, aortic dissection, acute myocardial infarction, acute renal failure, and presence of neurological symptoms.

CONCLUSION: A rising trend in hospitalization for HTNE, with an overall decrease in in-hospital mortality was observed from 2002 to 2012, possibly related to changes in coding practices and improved management. Presence of acute cardiorespiratory failure, stroke/TIA, chest pain, and aortic dissection were most predictive of higher hospital mortality.

Volume

30

Issue

7

First Page

700

Last Page

706

ISSN

1941-7225

Disciplines

Cardiology | Medical Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

28430850

Department(s)

Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division, Department of Medicine Faculty

Document Type

Article