Title

How do Medical Student Self-Assessments Compare With Their Final Clerkship Grades?

Publication/Presentation Date

2005

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine how a medical student's self-assessment at the completion of the third-year Ob/gyn clerkship compares with the institution's final grades at Lehigh Valley Hospital. From November 2002 to November 2003 at completion of each six-week Ob/gyn clerkship rotation, 47 medical students assessed themselves on the following parameters: fund of knowledge, personal attitude, clinical problem-solving skills, written/verbal skills, and technical skills. Additionally, they were asked to predict their performance on the NBME Shelf Exam. Their assessments were then compared with their final clerkship grades in each of the above parameters. Chi-squared and Kendall-tau tests were used to analyse the data for degree of agreement and association, respectively. There was a statistically significant weak to moderate, positive correlation between students’ self-assessment and final clerkship grade for written/verbal skills (p = 0.002, r = 0.390). A statistically significant agreement between raters was also revealed for written/verbal skills (p = 0.003). Weak, non-statistically significant, positive relationships were revealed for fund of knowledge, clinical problem-solving and technical skills. A weak, negative, non-significant relationship was revealed for personal attitudes, and there was no statistically significant relationship between students’ prediction of NBME score and categorized true score (p = 0.717, r = 0.49). At the end of their Ob/gyn clerkship, third-year medical students are better at assessing their technical and written/verbal skills than their global fund of knowledge and personal attitudes. These results may suggest that students are not aware of their own personal attitudes and communication skills and how they can affect their effectiveness as a physician.

Volume

27

Issue

5

First Page

445

Last Page

449

ISSN

0142-159X

Disciplines

Obstetrics and Gynecology

PubMedID

16147799

Department(s)

Administration and Leadership, Department of Community Health and Health Studies, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Faculty, Division of Education

Document Type

Article