Title

Relation Between Myocardial Infarction, Depression, Hostility, and Death.

Publication/Presentation Date

9-1-1999

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the independent impact of major depression and hostility on mortality rate at 6 months and 12 months after discharge from the hospital in patients with a myocardial infarction.

METHOD: Three hundred thirty-one patients were prospectively evaluated for depression with a modified version of the National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule for major depressive episode. The Cook Medley Hostility Scale data were analyzed by chi(2) procedures for nominal and categoric data, and Student t test was used for continuous data types.

RESULTS: Depression was a significant predictor of death at 12 months (P =. 04) but not at 6 months (P =.08). Hostility was not found to be a predictor of death at 6 months or 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS: Major depression in patients hospitalized after myocardial infarction is a significant univariable predictor of death at 12 months, although it was not a statistically significant predictor after adjusting for other variables. Hostility is not a predictor of death. Prospective studies are needed to determine the impact of aggressive treatment of depression on post-myocardial infarction survival.

Volume

138

Issue

3 Pt 1

First Page

549

Last Page

554

ISSN

0002-8703

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences | Psychiatry

PubMedID

10467207

Department(s)

Department of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry Faculty, Patient Care Services / Nursing

Document Type

Article