Title

Combining Abdominal and Cosmetic Breast Surgery Does Not Increase Short-term Complication Rates: A Comparison of Each Individual Procedure and Pretreatment Risk Stratification Tool.

Publication/Presentation Date

11-1-2015

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Combined abdominal and breast surgery presents a convenient and relatively cost-effective approach for accomplishing both procedures.

OBJECTIVES: This study is the largest to date assessing the safety of combined procedures, and it aims to develop a simple pretreatment risk stratification method for patients who desire a combined procedure.

METHODS: All women undergoing abdominoplasty, panniculectomy, augmentation mammaplasty, and/or mastopexy in the TOPS database were identified. Demographics and outcomes for combined procedures were compared to individual procedures using χ(2) and Student's t-tests. Multiple logistic regression provided adjusted odds ratios for the effect of a combined procedure on 30-day complications. Among combined procedures, a logistic regression model determined point values for pretreatment risk factors including diabetes (1 point), age over 53 (1), obesity (2), and 3+ ASA status (3), creating a 7-point pretreatment risk stratification tool.

RESULTS: A total of 58,756 cases met inclusion criteria. Complication rates among combined procedures (9.40%) were greater than those of aesthetic breast surgery (2.66%; P < .001) but did not significantly differ from abdominal procedures (9.75%; P = .530). Nearly 77% of combined cases were classified as low-risk (0 points total) with a 9.78% complication rates. Medium-risk patients (1 to 3 points) had a 16.63% complication rate, and high-risk (4 to 7 points) 38.46%.

CONCLUSIONS: Combining abdominal and breast procedures is safe in the majority of patients and does not increase 30-day complications rates. The risk stratification tool can continue to ensure favorable outcomes for patients who may desire a combined surgery.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Risk.

Volume

35

Issue

8

First Page

999

Last Page

1006

ISSN

1527-330X

Disciplines

Other Medical Specialties | Surgery

PubMedID

26163312

Department(s)

Department of Surgery, Department of Surgery Faculty

Document Type

Article