Title

Rectal prolapse: a search for the "best" operation.

Publication/Presentation Date

7-1-2001

Abstract

There is a lack of consensus regarding the optimal operative treatment for full-thickness rectal prolapse. We describe our experience in the management of procidentia and evaluate our current practice for improvement of results. The medical records of patients undergoing surgery for rectal prolapse between 1989 to 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 36 perineal proctosigmoidectomies (PPSs) and 29 abdominal procedures [17 anterior resections (ARs) and 12 Ripstein procedures (RPs)] were performed during the 10-year period. Patients undergoing PPS were significantly older and had more comorbidities. Mean operating time and length of hospital stay were shorter for the PPS group. Early and late postoperative complication rates were also significantly lower in the PPS group. Six patients (16%) in the PPS group developed recurrence at a mean follow-up of 50 months. Operation under general anesthesia or removal of a longer segment of prolapsed bowel did not reduce recurrence after PPS. No full-thickness recurrence was noted after AR or RP. We conclude that abdominal procedures (AR and RP) have the lowest recurrence but at a significantly higher cost in terms of complications. PPS is a valuable option in selected patients and can be performed with minimal morbidity and a relatively low recurrence rate.

Volume

67

Issue

7

First Page

622

Last Page

627

ISSN

0003-1348

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences | Other Medical Specialties | Surgery

PubMedID

11450773

Department(s)

Department of Community Health and Health Studies, Department of Surgery, Department of Surgery Faculty

Document Type

Article