Title

Does Earlier Cannulation With Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Adult Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Decrease Duration of Artificial Mechanical Ventilation?

Publication/Presentation Date

7-1-2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by an acute, diffuse, inflammatory lung injury, leading to increased alveolar capillary permeability, increased lung weight, and loss of aerated lung tissue (Fan, Brodie, & Slutsky, 2018). Primary treatment for ARDS is artificial mechanical ventilation (AMV) (Wu, Huang, Wu, Wang, & Lin, 2016). Given recent advances in technology, the use of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) to treat severe ARDS is growing rapidly (Combes et al., 2014).

OBJECTIVE: This 49-month quantitative, retrospective inpatient EMR chart review compared if cannulation with VV-ECMO up to and including 48 hours of admission and diagnosis in adult patients 30 to 65 years of age diagnosed with ARDS, decreased duration on AMV, as compared to participants who were cannulated after 48 hours of admission and diagnosis with ARDS.

METHODS: A total of 110 participants were identified as receiving VV-ECMO during the study timeframe. Of the 58 participants who met all inclusion criteria, 39 participants were cannulated for VV-ECMO within 48 hours of admission and diagnosis with ARDS, and 19 participants were cannulated with VV-ECMO after 48 hours of admission and diagnosis with ARDS.

RESULTS: Data collected identified no statistically significant (

CONCLUSIONS: Further studies are needed to determine if earlier initiation of VV-ECMO in adult patients with ARDS decrease time on AMV.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Although the results related to length of time on AMV did not produce statistical significance, the decreased duration of AMV in the participants who were cannulated within 48 hours (21 days vs. 27 days) may support several benefits associated with this participant population including increased knowledge of healthcare providers, decreased lung injury, earlier discharge which decreases hospital and patient cost, ability for patients to communicate sooner, decreased risk of pulmonary infection, decreased length of stay, decreased cost, and improved patient and family satisfaction.

Volume

13

Issue

2

First Page

148

Last Page

155

ISSN

2380-9426

Disciplines

Critical Care | Pulmonology

PubMedID

32817504

Department(s)

Health Care Informatics

Document Type

Article

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