Title

National trends in hospitalizations and outcomes in patients with alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

Publication/Presentation Date

11-1-2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have shown conflicting results regarding the natural history and outcomes with alcoholic cardiomyopathy (AC).

HYPOTHESIS: Determining the trends in hospitalization among patients with AC and associated outcomes will facilitate a better understanding of this disease.

METHODS: We conducted our analysis on discharge data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS) from 2002 through 2014. We obtained data from patients aged ≥18 years with diagnosis of "Alcoholic Cardiomyopathy." Death was defined within the NIS as in-hospital mortality. By using International Classification of Disease-9th edition-Clinical Modification (ICD-9CM) diagnoses and diagnosis-related groups different comorbidities were identified.

RESULTS: We studied a total of 45 365 admissions among patients with AC. The absolute number of admissions decreased from 2002 to 2014 (3866-2834 admissions). In-hospital mortality was variable throughout study duration without a clinically relevant trend (Mean 4.5%, range 3.6%-5.6%). The patients were mostly male (87%) and Caucasian (50.5%). Commonest age groups involved were 45-59 years (46.7%) followed by 60-74 years (29.2%). Trends in associated comorbidities such as smoking, drug abuse, depression, and hypertension increased over the same time period. Among all admissions, almost half were for cardiovascular etiologies (48.9%) and heart failure (≈24%) was the commonest reason for hospital admission.

CONCLUSION: While the overall admissions among patients with AC decreased over time, the proportion of patients with high-risk characteristics such as smoking, depression, and drug abuse increased. Patients aged 45 and older were largely affected and cardiovascular etiologies predominated among causes for admission.

Volume

41

Issue

11

First Page

1423

Last Page

1429

ISSN

1932-8737

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

30178565

Department(s)

Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division

Document Type

Article

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