Title

Frequency of in-hospital adverse outcomes and cost utilization associated with cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator implantation in the United States.

Publication/Presentation Date

10-1-2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The utilization of cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) has increased significantly, since its initial approval for use in selected patients with heart failure. Limited data exist as for current trends in implant-related in-hospital complications and cost utilization. The aim of our study was to examine in-hospital complication rates associated with CRT-D and their trends over the last decade.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we estimated 378 248 CRT-D procedures from 2003 to 2012. We investigated common complications, including mechanical, cardiovascular, pericardial complications (hemopericardium, cardiac tamponade, or pericardiocentesis), pneumothorax, stroke, vascular complications (consisting of hemorrhage/hematoma, incidents requiring surgical repair, and accidental arterial puncture), and in-hospital deaths described with CRT-D, defining them by the validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code. Mechanical complications (5.9%) were the commonest, followed by cardiovascular (3.6%), respiratory failure (2.4%), and pneumothorax (1.5%). Age (≥65 years), female gender (OR, 95% CI; P value) (1.08, 1.03-1.13; 0.001), and the Charlson score ≥3 (1.52, 1.45-1.60;

CONCLUSIONS: The overall complication rate in patients undergoing CRT-D has been increasing in the last decade. Age (≥65), female sex, and the Charlson score ≥3 were associated with higher complications. In patients who underwent CRT-D implantation, postoperative complications were associated with significant increases in cost.

Volume

29

Issue

10

First Page

1425

Last Page

1435

ISSN

1540-8167

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

30016005

Department(s)

Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division

Document Type

Article

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