/ ALLENTOWN \ ( HOSPITAL



ALLENTOWN HOSPITAL HALF-CENTURY


HALF-CENTURY

THE FIFTY-YEAR STORY

of

18991949

by

Gordon B. Fister

Published by

The Board of Trustees of the Allentown Hospital Association

May 7, 1949

.



W

VV ith a deep sense of gratitude for their inspiration and encouragement and particularly for their friendship, the author is proud to dedicate this volume

TO

ROBERT L. SCHAEFFER, M.D., Sc.D.

whose record of forty-one years of service to the Allentown Hospital is without parallel, and whose leadership as its Chief of Staff is responsible for much of its development through its second quarter-century,

AND TO

DAVID A. MILLER, Litt.D., LL.D.

a Trustee of the Hospital for twenty-six years, one of its most loyal advocates for more than fifty years, and the man who, through his newspaper, from 1894 to 1898 conducted the first public campaign for funds to establish the institution.

Copyright 1949 By the Allentown Hospital Association

Manufactured in the U.S.A.

Printed by    Photo Reproductions by

H. Ray Haas & Company    Holben - Printing

Allentown, Pennsylvania    Allentown, Pennsylvania

CONTENTS

FOREWORD

page ix


page xi

PREFACE


A few personal words of explanation and appreciation.

Chapter I

page I


FOR THIS COMMUNITY

A picture of Allentown in 1899 when the city’s first hospital opened its doors.

Chapter II

page 10


IN THE BEGINNING

Early movements looking toward the founding of a hospital, the organization of the Allentown Hospital Association, and the building of the first unit of the Hospital.

Chapter III

page 25


TESTING TIME

The first twenty-five years of the new institution, its development from 1899 to 1924.

Chapter IV

ACCOMPLISHMENTS COMPOUNDED

page 37


Growth and development of the Allentown Hospital during its second quarter-century, 1924 to 1949.

Chapter V

AND THE GREATEST OF THESE IS CHARITY page 50 Sources of support that made possible the founding and building of the Allentown Hospital and its service to the community, with some interesting statistical comparisons of maintenance costs and free care.

A TASK AND A TRUST    page 63

Services and duties of Trustees with thumbnail sketches of those who have been members of the Board.

Chapter VII

THEIR LABORS LIVE    page 82

Organization and development of the professional Staff; the story of the men and the women who, through the years, have directed the care of nearly a quarter-million patients. The chapter includes a roster of all members of the Major and Auxiliary Staffs.

Chapter VIII

BEHIND THE OPEN DOORS    page 129

Some of the ever-present problems of administration, maintenance, and housekeeping and those responsible for solving them.

Chapter IX

THIS, TOO, IS A TASK    page 136

The function of the Allentown Hospital in training physicians, surgeons, and specialists through its interne and resident program. Included is a roster of those who have served as internes and residents.

Chapter X

WILLING HANDS    page 165

The development of the nursing service in the Hospital and its chief source of supply, the School of Nursing.

The chapter includes professional biographical rosters of the Faculty of the School and of its graduates, and a list of students.

Chapter XI

DEVOTION PERSONIFIED    page 249

This chapter is the story of the faithful service of the Senior Auxiliary, the Junior Auxiliary, the Junior Aides, the Grey Ladies, and the other volunteer groups identified with the institution.

Chapter XII

AND NOW, TOMORROW    page 264

A glimpse into the future, presenting some of the prob-, lems the community and the Hospital must solve.

ILLUSTRATIONS

With few exceptions, the contemporary photographs used in HALF - CENTURY were taken during February 1949 by Gerald P. Snyder. The exceptions, noted on this list with asterisks, are from the files of the late John Kubil, made available by the present owners of the Allentown Photographic Studio. Older pictures have been reproduced from a pictorial publication issued by the Hospital at least thirty-five years ago.

The aerial photograph used inside the covers is from the files of the Call-Chronicle Newspapers with the proposed new buildings projected on it by Technical Art Service of Allentown from approved plans by Hospital architects.

1.

The Allentown Hospital Today —an aerial study.

2.

The Allentown Hospital Tomorrow — an

aerial study with pro-

jections.

3.

First Hospital building.

opposite page

16

4.

The Hospital with the Mosser Wing.

opposite page

17

5.

The Hospital after the erection of the

east wing. opposite page

32

6.

A modern operating room.

opposite page

33

7.

The operating room in 1912.

opposite page

33

8.

The Hospital in February 1949.

follows page

40

9.

A unit of the X-ray Department.

follows page

40

10.

The X-ray Department in 1912.

follows page

40

11.

A Laboratory in 1949.

follows page

40

12.

The Laboratory in 1914.

follows page

40

13.

A room on a new semi-private floor.

opposite page

41

14.

One of the private rooms in 1912.

opposite page

41

15.

A section of the present diet kitchen.

follows page

56

16.

The diet kitchen in 1912.

follows page

56

17.

One of the present obstetrical rooms.

follows page

56

18.

The delivery room in 1912.

follows page

56

19.

One of the Hospital’s modern nurseries. * follows page

56

20.

The nurseries thirty-five years ago.

follows page

56

21.

Accommodations for ward patients.

opposite page

57

22.

H. W. Allison

folloius page

72

23.

The Reverend J. A. Singmaster.

follows page

72

24.

Judge Edward Harvey.

follows page

72

25.

James F. Hunsicker.

opposite page

73

26.

Attorney Fred B. Gernerd.

opposite page

80

27.

Attorney Reuben J. Butz.

opposite page

81

28.

The Board of Trustees in February 1949.

opposite page

96

29.

Superintendent George W. Sherer, Assistant Superintendents

Ray T. Kern and Orlando M. Bowen.

opposite

page

97

30.

Orlando Fegley, M.D.

follows

page

104

31.

Charles D. Schaeffer, M.D.

follows

page

104

32.

Robert L. Schaeffer, M.D.

follows

page

104

33.

Department Chiefs in February 1949.

opposite

page

105

34.

Resident Staff in February 1949.

opposite

page

160

35.

The Knerr and Reichenbach Memorial

Homes.

opposite

page

160

36.

The Harvey Memorial Nurses’ Home.

opposite

page

161

37.

Proposed additions to the home for nurses.

opposite

page

161

38.

Ethlyn Eichel, Adele Miller, Marie Miller.

opposite

page

176

39.

First Class of Nurses.

opposite

page

177

40.

Student Nurses 1949.

opposite

page

177

41.

Senior Auxiliary Presidents.

follows

page

248

42.

Junior Auxiliary Presidents.

follows

page

248

43.

Grey Ladies in February 1949.

follows

page

248

44.

Officers of the Junior Aides.

follows

page

248

45.

A Junior Auxiliary sewing group.

follows

page

248

46.

In the crippled children’s clinic. *

follows

page

248

47. Architect’s sketch for the proposed administration building.

opposite page 249

FOREWORD

THERE are times in the ordinary experience of every successful business and every industry when inventories must be extended beyond a mere material stock-taking to an appraisal of intangible assets, a survey encompassing the evaluation of policies and their results, a parallel study of hopes and achievements. Individuals, perhaps more frequently than they realize it, are subject to similar self-analysis.

The Board of Trustees of the Allentown Hospital Association, believing that the fiftieth anniversary of the opening of the city’s first hospital was an appropriate time for such a study, made the historical survey a definite assignment to the Golden Anniversary Committee which it had appointed. The Board stipulated only that the appraisal be fair and factual. It expressed the hope, however, that the history would be bright enough to be widely read.

It was the opinion of the Committee that the contemplated history should be written by someone not directly associated with the Allentown Hospital, yet familiar enough with both the Hospital and the community to understand their peculiar problems and their relationship to each other. With that in mind, they entrusted the project to Gordon B. Fister, a son of the community, a product of its schools, a newspaperman who over a period of more than a dozen years had assignments which brought him into almost daily contacts with the Hospital, its Staff, and its patients. He was given a free hand. All records, except the confidential charts and case histories of individual patients, were open to him. Hospital personnel was at liberty to answer any questions, to supply any information within their command. The manuscript was neither censored nor revised.

This is, therefore, the story of the Allentown Hospital through its first fifty years by a member of the staff of the Call-Chronicle Newspapers trained to seek facts and to evaluate them. It is not intended to be boastful. If there are any who receive the impression that it is, the reason is simply that the author, like so many other residents of Allentown, is proud of the Hospital and appreciates the service it has been able to render to the community.

The Committee appreciates the cooperation of all those who have made the publication of this volume possible, particularly the generous support of the Trustees, the Junior Auxiliary, the Alumnae Association of the School of Nursing, and the Association of Ex-Internes and Residents. It sincerely hopes that the story here unfolded will recall memories for old friends and justify their faith, that it will win for the Hospital the new confidence and the new support it merits, and that it will, by citing the accomplishments and the services of others, point the way to even greater achievements.

THE ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE

Victor R. Schmidt, Chairman Frederick G. Helwig, M.D., Secretary Frank M. Cressman, Treasurer William O. Gross Robert L. Schaeffer, M.D.

George W. Sherer Harry S. Good, M.D.

Hannah M. Durham Mary Siegfried Letitia Bernhard Ethlyn L. Eichel Adele M. Miller Gordon B. Fister

PREFACE

To appreciate an individual, to recognize his virtues as well as his faults and to understand the reasons for them, it is necessary to know him. It is just as important to know an institution thoroughly before it is possible to understand its aims and to appreciate its accomplishments.

Because I spent all of my nearly thirty-eight years in Allentown, I felt reasonably certain that I knew the Allentown Hospital. As a newspaper reporter, whose daily rounds for eighteen years led behind the scenes of the Hospital and into the confidences of many members of its Staff, I believed that I understood its mission and at least some of its problems. As a father whose two daughters first looked up at him from the arms of a nurse within the institution’s hushed corridors, I was confident that I appreciated it.

I neither understood nor appreciated the Allentown Hospital, however, until I undertook the study of the factors that are a part of its origin, of its development, and of its pattern of service to a community of which I would be even more proud if it showed a more complete appreciation of the Hospital and of the other institutions that have contributed to its greatness. Even now, I do not feel that I fully appreciate it because I do not pretend to know all of its history. Those hundreds who have created the Hospital as it is today, those more than 200,000 who have appraised it as patients, have tales of their own which, because of the brevity of time and space, cannot be related in this volume.

It is difficult to say when I began the research for this undertaking. I can remember the late Dr. Rewellyn C. Peters — that old-time family doctor whose candy pills and licorice-flavored potions cured many an ill — speaking of the Hospital when I was a child, and when a tonsillectomy that is still to be performed was a matter of serious family discussion. I know I heard more about it when, as a student at Muhlenberg College, I followed a well-worn path to the pleasant diversions Muhlenberg men always found at the southeast corner of Seventeenth and Chew Streets.

I cannot recall when I first visited friends in the Hospital. I do remember, however, that my general impressions of it always were favorable, even when there were details I felt justified in criticizing. I vividly recall two bleak winter mornings when I anxiously paced its fifth floor corridor waiting to again see a lovely and familiar face, wreathed in smiles, and to hear two tiny voices

that have become stronger and more appealing each hour of each day.

Then there are the recollections of my years as a newspaperman with daily assignments in the Hospital. I have seen its calm efficiency and its great heart, routinely and in periods of emergency and stress. I have watched its doctors and nurses wage countless battles against great odds and I have seen the happy expressions on their faces as the Great Physician decreed victory for them. I think I know, for I have seen them too, how they feel when a battle has been lost. I have learned to have respect for most of them, a great deal more than respect for many.

That is the background for the more academic research that began last July after the Board of Trustees decided that a history should be compiled. I appreciate, probably more than they will know, the fact that I was invited to take the assignment. I regret that the time has been so short. There are many more facets that could be explored and developed.

Because this book is my first and well may be my only one, I hope that I may be pardoned a few personal and general appreciations. The greatest is reserved for one who nearly fifteen years ago, without too much reluctance, agreed to share the life of a newspaperman. Her cheerfulness and her smiles, her patience and her confidence, her thoughtfulness and her understanding, have been both my greatest inspiration and my encouragement in every undertaking. Then there are Barbara and Sarah who, though tender in years, have at least given the impression of understanding when hours that should have been devoted to them were spent, instead, poring over musty records and bending over a typewriter that could be both stupid and obstinate.

At the top of the list are my Father and Mother, William and Mary Fister, veteran teachers who probably found me their most difficult pupil. Theirs was the patience and the endurance, perhaps even the faith and the courage, that moulded thinking and established the basis for ideals. I know how they struggled so that two sons might have a college education. I know how much more than money they put into the attainment of a goal to which they still look forward. I am happy that they will be able to read this book, written by an appreciative son.

There were other teachers who were patient and thorough and who left an indelible imprint: Dora Stuber and Orel Long and Mary Daubert; Helen Gearhart, Ambrose Heller, and Esther Heffner; Stephen G. Simpson, James Edgar Swain, John D. M. Brown, John V. Shankweiler, and George T. Ettinger. Outside of the classroom there were such great teachers as E. J. McGettigan, whose patient counsel and advice as a city editor and as a friend have been more than adequate substitutes for a dozen university courses in journalism or practical philosophy; David A. Miller, whose kindly Christian way of life has meant so much to this community and whose example was cited to me from childhood; Major

J. C. Shumberger, the late Royal W. Weiler, William D. Reimert, Percy B. Ruhe, Levering Tyson, H. A. Benfer, the late Reverend John M. G. Darms, Everett and Helen Sherrill, Caroline Everton Sherrill, and the many others who by example, by precept, and by their trust have had a share in forming a philosophy and in helping to achieve any skills I may have acquired. In their own way, each has had a share in this book and I am grateful to them.

I am particularly grateful to those who have been so generous in taking time from crowded schedules to assist in the many tasks and chores that have entered into the compilation and production of this book. The Board of Trustees and the Fiftieth Anniversary Committee of the Allentown Hospital have given me a free hand both in writing and producing the volume. Dr. Robert L. Schaeffer and George W. Sherer, whose unselfish service and friendliness should never be forgotten either by the Hospital or by the community, have assisted in gathering much of the material and have checked it for accuracy. Dr. James Edgar Swain, Head of the Department of Social Studies at Muhlenberg College and an experienced hand at historical research and writing, has painstakingly read the manuscript and has assisted in checking proofs. Dr. John

D. M. Brown, Head of the English Department at Muhlenberg College, and Percy B. Ruhe, Editor of the Morning Call during most of the Hospital’s history, have made many valuable suggestions as they reviewed the manuscript. Dr. Robert C. Horn, whose eagle eye has found typographical errors in many printed records, has done his best to eliminate them from this one. I am indebted, too, to Sallie Straub, a former President of the Senior Auxiliary, for her splendid account of that organization’s service; to Mary Siegfried and Bessie Deily and Winifred Bausch for supplementing the records of the Junior Auxiliary; to Anne Hurdell Baas for the story of the organization of the Junior Aides; to Margaret Cortright for the account of the Grey Ladies; and to Ray T. Kern, Sr., whose carefully kept scrap books of clippings saved many hours of research. Earlier historical research on the School of Nursing, compiled by Alma Urffer and supplemented by Ethlyn Eichel and Adele Miller, has been helpful. Former Mayor Fred E. Lewis, Mabel Brown, a member of the first class to be graduated from the School of Nursing, and many veteran members of the Hospital Staff provided information not available in the records.

It would be ungrateful of me to omit special mention of Elsie Mittl Schmoyer, for nearly six years my faithful Girl Friday in the Public Relations Office at Muhlenberg College, who has aided in compiling much of the material used in the book, typed and retyped the manuscript for many hours after her normal day’s work was done, and eliminated many errors from both manuscript and proofs. A word of thanks, too, to Catherine Moncman of the Hospital’s secretarial staff, for faithfulness and cooperation in a hundred details. Special thanks also are due to Stanley Whitner of H. Ray Haas and Company for his many suggestions on typography and format and for an excellent production record.

There is just one suggestion I would like to make. Institutions like the Allentown Hospital are too prone to take their accomplishments for granted, too reticent about recording them. As memories fail, specific details that years later will be of inestimable value are forgotten. For the benefit of those who in the future will record their progress, I believe that minutes should be written with a view to their historical value and that many documents now considered as trivial should be preserved.

This assignment has been one of the most pleasant I have ever undertaken. I believe it is an accurate and faithful portrayal of the life and service of the Allentown Hospital, based upon its own records and supplemented by newspaper reports covering its day-by-day activities through the half-century. That is what I have tried to make it. I trust it will serve its purpose — to acquaint the Hospital’s oldest friends even more thoroughly with its rich heritages and traditions and to win for this institution the new friends whose confidence and support it long has merited.

Gordon B. Fister

Muhlenberg College Allentown, Pennsylvania

March 15, 1949

FOR THIS COMMUNITY

r V 1HE old hose cart horse heaved and panted; his hoofs struck I sparks on the paving blocks of the Hamilton Street hill and his harness creaked as he pulled the city’s old white ambulance up the street from the Central Railroad Station just before twilight on the evening of May 23, 1899.

It was the first trip the ambulance was taking along the route, a new route over crushed stone and oil-bound streets, passing shops and taverns, homes and farmlands, to a new institution on the far western fringe of the city. Its destination was the Allentown Hospital, a dream and a goal for more than a decade, now about to open its doors to the first of the nearly 240,000 patients for whom it has cared during its first half-century.

The ambulance, housed at the America fire station on the site of the present City Hall, had been summoned to the Terminal Station to meet the late afternoon work train from the cement belt. Shortly after four o’clock that afternoon, Clinton Troxell of Easton, a bricklayer employed by the contractor erecting an addition to the Siegfried mill of the Lawrence Cement Company, had been injured seriously when the scaffold on which he was working collapsed, plunging him sixty feet to the ground. An area doctor provided temporary treatment and, when the work day ended, the injured workman was placed aboard the train for Allentown. According to the newspapers of that morning, the city’s first hospital was ready to receive patients. At 5:28 p.m. Mr. Troxell was transferred from the train to the ambulance and shortly after six o’clock he was in the Hospital’s glistening white operating room with four doctors setting his leg which had been fractured in three places, suturing a severe laceration of his chin, and caring for cuts and bruises on his head and shoulders.

Although Allentown had been the Lehigh County seat for eighty-seven years, as a city it was just thirty-two years old when the

Hospital opened its doors. Its area of little more than three square miles extended from the Lehigh River on the east to Seventeenth Street on the west, from the Little Lehigh creek on the south to Sumner Avenue on the north. The population was just passing 35,000— 17,226 males and 18,190 females, of whom 91.5 per cent were native born. Of the foreign born, 1,065 came from Germany, 573 from Ireland, 552 from Austria, Bohemia, and Hungary, and 257 from England, Scotland, and Wales. There were 10,962 from five to twenty years of age, and 10,160 males of voting age. More than ninety-six per cent of the population over ten years of age was literate.

Captain James Schaadt, a prominent attorney, was Mayor of the City that was governed by a Select and Common Council, composed of representatives from each of the ten wards. Ten patrolmen and a night sergeant comprised the Police Department under Chief Patrick McGee. The semi-paid Fire Department under Chief John V. Huffort consisted of eight volunteer companies and had thirty-seven alarm boxes strategically located through the compact little city. The city had ten grammar schools and over one hundred primary and secondary teachers. Two years earlier the Allentown High School graduated the first class from what then was a three-year course. There were two liberal arts colleges, Muhlenberg and the Allentown College for Women, now known as Cedar Crest, two business colleges, a public library, a board of trade, a telephone exchange, an electric light company, a gas company, and nine local newspapers, including several weeklies.

Allentown boasted of a Young Men’s Christian Association, a Young Women’s Christian Association, a Women’s Christian Temperance Union with numerous branches, thirty-six churches, temperance societies, innumerable lodges, a professional baseball team, and four bands. There were four major hotels with dozens of smaller taverns that accommodated some permanent and transient guests, sixteen livery and boarding stables, ten laundries and four breweries. The trolley line extended to Seventeenth Street and there were still four stage coach lines, carrying mail and passengers with daily trips to the rural areas of the county. Ten years earlier, the Allentown Fair had been moved to the northwest corner of Seventeenth and Chew Streets, but until 1901 it was a part of South Whitehall Township. The names of twenty-four physicians, several of whom were proprietors of drugstores and soda fountains adjacent to their offices, were listed along with eighteen dentists in the City Directory for 1899. There were only five undertakers and the newspapers commented that because “people live long in Allentown the nine cemeteries are sufficient for the present.”

That the people of Allentown were thrifty, sober, and industrious was evidenced by the fact that it had three heavily capitalized banks and only a single pawnshop. There were 7,930 families of which 2,705 owned their own homes, 1,509 of them free of debt. Within the city limits, there were 7,558 dwellings. The average family numbered 4.5 persons and the records show that there were 507 widows and forty-two persons who were divorced.

The newspapers and the Board of Trade were proud that Allentown was a growing city, indicated by the fact that during the ten years prior to the opening of the Hospital, its population had increased by ten thousand and during a twenty-year period had nearly doubled. It was one of 164 cities in the United States with a population of more than 25,000.

Of the 28,452 residents of the city over ten years of age, 15,230 were gainfully employed: 60 in agriculture, 671 in professional services, 2,851 in domestic or personal services, 3,425 in trade and transportation, and 8,223 in manufacturing and mechanical pursuits. According to the Census of 1900, there were 491 mechanical and manufacturing industries in Allentown, capitalized at $11,996,971 and producing products valued at $16,947,722. Their annual payroll was $3,476,732 with an average yearly income of $845.29 for salaried employes and $360.95 for those employed at daily or hourly wages or at piece rates. The Mayor’s salary was $1,019.44 per year and the Chief of Police received $917.50.

Iron and steel manufacturing, although it had passed its peak in Allentown, was still the major industry with five mills and plants turning out products valued at $4,443,782 in 1899. Seven silk mills, whose products totalled $3,467,792 in that year, were climbing in importance. Products of thirteen foundries and machine shops were valued at $1,242,589; of nine shoe factories at $900,976; of six men’s clothing factories at $456,290; and of forty-eight tobacco, cigar, and cigarette processors at $464,348. There were nine bicycle and tricycle repair shops, fourteen blacksmith and wheelwright shops, twenty-four bakeries, five brick and tile manufacturers, four plants that made brooms and brushes, seven carriage and wagon shops, thirty dressmaking establishments and twenty-nine manufacturing milliners, six furniture factories, six tombstone works, seven lumber and planing mills, nine printing establishments, sixteen carpentry contractors, thirty-seven painting and seven paper-hanging firms, fourteen plumbing establishments, and four plastering contractors, eight shops that repaired watches and clocks, five manufacturers of harnesses and saddlery, thirteen tinsmith and sheet metal shops, and some fifty other industries.

Lehigh County, with a population of 93,893 had 1,043 manufacturing and mechanical establishments valued at $26,254,303, owned by 1,252 individuals, and producing products with a total annual value of $31,250,205. They employed 17,150 persons who earned $6,863,469. Iron, steel, and cement were the leading industries outside of the city.

Hamilton Street was surfaced with rolled crushed stone and Center Square was a broad commons, still without the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ monument, when the ambulance made its first trip to the Allentown Hospital. Wooden awnings of shops and hotels hung over the brick and cinder block pavements and horses were hitched to posts and rails along the curb. There were neither traffic lights nor traffic policemen, but at every intersection volunteers stepped out to clear the way for the approaching white wagon.

Judge Edwin Albright stepped out on the porch of his home at the southeast corner of Fifth and Hamilton Streets, present site of the Post Office, and Postmaster M. P. Schantz looked out from the window of what then was the post office on the northeast corner. William Ainey, President of the Second National Bank, stood in the yard of his home on the southwest corner. Others stood on the Court House plaza, then as now at the northwest corner of Fifth and Hamilton Streets. Guests looked on from the Trexler House at 343-47 Hamilton Street, from the broad plate glass windows of the American Hotel at Sixth and Hamilton Streets, from the Hotel Allen at Seventh and Hamilton Streets, from the Cross Keys Hotel at the northwest corner of Eighth and Hamilton Streets, the Windsor Hotel at 821 Hamilton Street, the Grand Central Hotel on the present site of Hess Brothers, and from the Columbia Hotel at the northwest corner of Tenth and Hamilton Streets.

Clerks were just beginning to leave the C. A. Dorney furniture store near Fourth and Hamilton Streets, Dungan and Fry, the G. C. Aschbach and Kramer music stores in the 500 block, and the Breinig and Bachman men’s furnishing store at the southeast corner of Sixth and Hamilton Streets. Several doctors were discussing topics of the day at Klump’s drugstore at 537 Hamilton Street and guests at Gehringer Brothers restaurant and saloon expressed more than passing interest as the ambulance moved up the street. Editors and composing room crews looked up from the Morning Call offices at 16 South Sixth Street, from their desks in the Daily City Item offices at 607 Hamilton Street, the Daily Leader and Friedens Bote at 631 Hamilton Street, the Democrat at 632 Hamilton Street, and the Chronicle and News Building on South Center Square.

Moving up Hamilton Street along the six hundred block, the ambulance passed the Wilson Gross restaurant on the northwest corner of Sixth and Hamilton Streets; the Ebbecke Hardware Store, then as now at 606 Hamilton Street; the Appel Jewelry Store, H. Leh and Company, and the Lehigh Valley Trust Company, all at the locations they still occupy; the Peters and Jacoby restaurant and ice cream parlor and Zion Reformed church at opposite corners of Hamilton and Church Streets; the Pennsylvania Telephone Exchange at 608 Hamilton Street; W. R. Lawfer and Company at 611 and 613; Bastian Brothers and Bastian, clothiers and furnishers, at 629; Shimer, Laub and Weaver, carpets and floor coverings, at 637; Anewalt Brothers hat store, with its white bear in the entrance, at 615; the American Medicine Company at 643; the Circle Restaurant at 640 and 642; and Koch Brothers and Shankweiler and Lehr, clothing stores, across the street from each other on the east side of the Square.

The Allentown National Bank, the Second National Bank, and John Weiler’s liquor store were on the Square, just off Hamilton Street. The Globe Store, a department store then known as the Globe Warehouse, was near the Square on the north side of Hamilton Street at 703-705. Knerr and Company had their grocery store at 707, Shoemaker’s City Drug store was at 722, the H. Guth and Son dry goods store at 737, Helfrich and Company’s furniture store at 734, the Hunsicker and Company tobacco center at 727, M. S. Young and Company’s hardware store at 740, the Farr, Haas, and Company shoe store at 739 and 741, and the S. B. Anewalt hat store at 744.

There were relatively few retail establishments farther west. Good’s drug store, in later years a landmark at Sixth and Hamilton Streets, then was located at 803 Hamilton. Hess Brothers recently had opened a department store at 831-833 Hamilton Street, an establishment that was modest in comparison with today’s enterprise. The Bowen grocery store, with its pungent odor of coffee and aging cheese, was located at 809 and 811, the Grimley carpet store at 804, the F. Hersh hardware store at 825 and 827, the Haas music store at 830, and the Berkemeyer and Keck stationery store and printing plant at 844. The Trexler lumber yard occupied a site on Hamilton Street just east of Tenth. Beyond that, the ambulance carrying Clinton Troxell passed homes and farmland. There were but a dozen homes on Hamilton Street west of Fourteenth, only four of them beyond Fifteenth Street. Charles Ziegenfus had gone into the country a few years earlier when he erected his home at the northwest corner of Sixteenth and Hamilton Streets. A visit to the Allentown Fair was still regarded as a trip to the country. The city’s bill for street lights was $13,000 compared with $105,000 a year today.

Lights were just being turned on at Seventeenth and Chew Streets when the ambulance brought the first patient to the Allentown Hospital. Four doctors and the three nurses on the staff were waiting and a handful of visitors, some of them more curious than interested, were inspecting what for most of them was the first hospital they had ever seen.

There is no record of how long Clinton Troxell remained at the Hospital. If his experience followed the pattern of the 168 patients admitted during the first six months, he remained slightly more than sixteen-and-one-half days and his care cost the Hospital $1.15 per day. By contrast, the 13,658 patients admitted during the Hospital year ending May 31, 1948 remained for an average of 9.76 days and their care cost $7.05 per day.

If the Allentown of fifty years ago seems quaint in comparison with today’s modern and thriving city of 104,000 persons, then the thirty-bed Allentown Hospital of an earlier era in the science of medicine and surgery, must appear almost archaic in contrast with its present day counterpart, a completely accredited and approved institution that has served as many as 496 patients in a single day, and that is pointing toward normal adequate facilities for the care of at least five hundred patients with emergency accommodations far in excess of that number. The city’s mortality rate in 1899 was 18.1 per thousand. Today it has been reduced to 9.4.

Aseptic surgery, for example, was so new when the Allentown Hospital admitted its first patient that the Board of Trustees believed it required special action to instruct the surgeons on the Staff to “thoroughly carry out the principles of aseptic surgery and provide themselves with the necessary clothing for carrying this resolution into effect."

The surgeons who treated Clinton Troxell had little choice of an anaesthetic to relieve him of pain while they were setting the triple fracture of his leg. The only safe anaesthetics were chloroform and ether. It was not until a few years before the beginning of the First World War that nitrous oxide combined with oxygen was introduced. Some years later, experiments with spinal anaesthetics were successful and, during the late years of the Second World War, the use of sodium pentothal became widespread. Neither ethelene nor cyclopropane, used at various times in some hospitals, were ever employed at the Allentown Hospital because of the danger of explosions. For today’s surgical procedures, surgeons have the choice of the anaesthetic that best meets the needs of their patient in relation to the operation that is to be performed. Ether, nitrous oxide combined with oxygen, sodium pentothal, or spinal anaesthesia administered continuously or intermittently, are available for major surgical procedures.

The X-ray, discovered in 1895, was being shown to medical students in 1897 and 1898 almost as a curiosity, a device that at some future time would be available to supplement their sense of touch in diagnosing fractures and in determining the position of broken bones. Late in 1899, the Board of Trustees gave Dr. C. D. Schaeffer authority to have his own X-ray installed in the Hospital, and in 1906, directed the purchase of “the most modern X-ray equipment at a cost not to exceed $985.” Funds were provided by the Ladies Auxiliary. The early equipment emitted sparks and, although the Allentown Hospital was fortunate, in other places across the country there were many examples of severe burns. Early X-rays were satisfactory only to aid in the diagnosis of bone cases. Their use for deep therapy tissue treatment is a comparatively recent development.

Blood transfusions were unknown when the Allentown Hospital was opened. Introduced into general use little more than thirty years ago, they led to the development of methods for preserving blood, the manufacture and storage of blood plasma, and the establishment of blood banks. Methods of transfusion also have been refined until today the administration of blood and plasma is routine not only in practically all surgical cases but in many medical procedures.

In the treatment of infections, the physicians and surgeons of fifty years ago were compelled to rely completely on strengthening the normal bacteria-fighting processes of the body. The use of the wide range of the new sulfa drugs, of penicillin, and of the even newer streptomycin are developments of the latter part of the last decade. The use of serums and antitoxins, now so common that they are routine, almost from the cradle, was unknown when the Allentown Hospital was opened a half-century ago.

Typhoid fever was a common ailment when the Hospital was established, accounting for more than 450 admissions from 1908 to 1916. At one time, more than fifty patients were ill with the disease in the institution’s isolation division. Improved methods of sanitation in handling and distributing water and milk have all but eliminated the disease; it is not unusual for a physician to complete his medical training and his internship without seeing a single case. There are physicians in the Allentown area today, who, although they have practiced a dozen or more years, never have treated a typhoid fever patient. Diphtheria, another scourge of a generation ago, is becoming nearly as rare with the widespread use of antitoxins developed within the life span of the Allentown Hospital.

Pasteurization of milk and the elimination of tubercular cattle have reduced to a minimum the cases of tuberculosis of the bones, joints, and glands that once filled many beds in the Allentown Hospital. Veteran members of the Hospital Staff have seen the introduction of insulin and were among the first to use it in the treatment of diabetes. They have witnessed in their daily visits to the Hospital the development of intravenous feedings and the compounding of the hundreds of solutions used to sustain life when normal feeding would retard the recovery of the patient. A separate unit in the Hospital organization is required for this comparatively new procedure. Methods and techniques used in the early determination of symptoms of cancer, of tuberculosis, and of heart conditions are other fields in which the Allentown Hospital and members of its Staff have been among the pioneers, and are included among the services it renders to the community of which it is a part.

Standardization of hospitals and their approval by the American College of Surgeons is a development in which the Allentown Hospital has shared since Clinton Troxell was admitted. The program of rigid inspection to meet the high standards of the American College of Surgeons was organized in 1918 and the Allentown Hospital has been on the list of those that are fully approved since it was first surveyed, at its own request, in 1920. Of the 353 hospitals in Pennsylvania registered by the American Medical Association, it is one of the 263 approved by the American College of Surgeons. Among the approved hospitals it is one of nineteen in Pennsylvania which also merit approval of the American College of Surgeons for graduate training in surgery or a surgical specialty and for the operation of a cancer clinic; the approval of the American Medical Association Council on Medical Education and Hospitals for the training of internes and residents; and the approval of the State

Board of Nurse Examiners for a School of Nursing. Of those nineteen hospitals, only ten are located outside of the Philadelphia and Pittsburgh areas.

It is perhaps sufficient to say here, because the evidence will be clear as each period and phase of the Hospital’s history is treated specifically, that as the City of Allentown has expanded, as new developments and new discoveries have added to its stature and to the happiness and well-being of its people, so the Allentown Hospital has progressed in its field. Through its zeal and the devotion of its Trustees, its Staff, its Auxiliaries, and its friends it has duplicated in this community practically all of the facilities and the skills of the nation’s largest and most progressive medical centers.

Hamilton Street has changed since the horse-drawn ambulance made its first trip westward to an institution whose portraits painted then and now will show only one similarity — the dogged will and determination to serve faithfully and well.

IN THE BEGINNING

ALLENTOWN was a city o£ little more than 25,000 population when a group of its more far-sighted citizens, acting under the authority of City Council, in 1892 made the first attempts to establish a hospital, an institution they recognized to be one of the primary needs of a community that was the center of a growing and thriving industrial area.

Illnesses, for the most part, were treated in the home. Even major surgery, when it no longer could be avoided, was performed on a dining room or kitchen table. Only the more fortunate could be admitted to St. Luke’s Hospital, which had been established in Bethlehem in 1875, or to hospitals in Philadelphia or New York. Mortality was high and the arduous travel, even to Fountain Hill, involved as many hazards to the patient as the operation itself.

It was a period graphically described by Dr. J. Chalmers DaCosta, Professor of Surgery at Jefferson Medical College when the Allentown Hospital was in its infancy, and a physician whose prose was as brilliant as his surgery:

“Many people were operated on in their homes. And what a fearful trouble it was. From a day or two before the operation until a day or two afterward I was as busy as a bird dog or a gas meter. A room had to be stripped of furniture and carpet. The walls and ceiling were scrubbed. A table was improvised from a kitchen table or an ironing board on trestles. Great packages of dressings and bags of instruments were carried to the house. The day of the operation the instruments were sterilized in kettles of boiling water over the kitchen fire.

It took at least two hours to lay out everything in the operating room. The smell of ether permeated the house, and this smell, with hurrying footsteps and other sounds, drove the realization of the dread drama of the operation into the minds of the anxious and perhaps terrified family. If the operation had been severe, I stayed in the house one night, two nights, or more, to do, if necessary, what a resident physician now does

in a hospital. What a work it was! What an expenditure of time it called for! What a strain it inflicted on a family! And every now and then the surgeon would be put to his trumps to manage an unexpected complication which could have been more rapidly and safely dealt with in a hospital. An absent instrument might suddenly be required. There is no instrument room in a private house. The surgeon had to do without it.

A drug not then at hand might be badly needed. There is no drug store in a residence (although the closet of a nervous man or a hysterical woman might suggest a pharmacy). The absence of a needed drug or instrument always meant trouble and sometimes spelled disaster. A surgeon who has never performed an operation in a private home can’t begin to appreciate what a luxury it is and what a comforting sense of safety it brings to operate in a hospital. Is it any wonder that after such a strain and labor we got a little sore when our bills were not paid?”

Winslow Wood and M. J. Lennon, councilmen representing the Second and Sixth wards, respectively, realized some of these conditions and knew, too, that hospitals had been established in Reading and in Easton, when they introduced a resolution into City Council on November 1, 1892 authorizing Mayor Samuel D. Lehr to call a public meeting in the council chambers on December 14, 1892, to consider establishing a hospital in Allentown

Only the bare minutes of that first meeting remain, but they are sufficient to evidence the keen interest, at least on the part of a small group, in the establishment of a hospital. Mayor Lehr served as chairman and presented the proposal that had been made in council, a proposal that emphasized the need for a hospital, but that made no suggestions of support from public funds. Conditions that prompted the movement, the services it would render to the community, and methods that might be used to finance the project were convincingly presented by representatives of the medical profession and from the viewpoints of those in other areas of Allentown’s life. Among those who spoke were Dr. H. H. Herbst, named secretary of the meeting, Dr. E. G. Martin, Dr. P. L. Reichard, Dr. H. K. Hartzell, Dr. W. P. Kistler, all physicians;

E. S. Shimer, a merchant and a former mayor; James F. Gallagher, a school teacher, and the Reverend A. R. Horne, a clergyman and educator.

They reviewed the development of hospitals, recalling that it was in the days of the Crusades when, under the leadership of the Church and with its encouragement, great hospitals were established. They explained, too, that modern hospitals, like some other improvements in general living, came first to assist the poor. They cited Sir William Oster’s lecture in which he told the people of England that while they denied themselves the great advantages of getting well in a modern hospital in case of serious illness, they contributed generously to afford just such an opportunity to the poorest subjects in the realm. The Allentown Hospital, they insisted, would serve rich and poor alike, extending charity to those in need of it, and exacting a fair payment from those able to afford its care. They emphasized the handicaps under which the physicians of the community were working in their efforts to preserve health and restore broken bodies and, from case histories, they cited tragedies that could have been averted if there had been a hospital in the community. They argued that it would be to the economic benefit as well as to the spiritual advantage of the area to have its own hospital and they urged a united effort to establish it.

For the moment, at least, their arguments were convincing and, upon motion of Alvin P. Zellner and E. S. Shimer, Mayor Lehr appointed a committee of physicians to devise means for implementing what was interpreted as the definite will to provide a hospital. The committee included Dr. H. H. Herbst, Dr. E. G. Martin, Dr. P. L. Reichard, Dr. W. H. Hartzell, Dr. W. P. Kistler, and Dr. Charles Martin. The committee lost little time and, at another public meeting in Council Chambers on December 27, they recommended the establishment of an institution to be known as the Allentown Hospital. The hospital, they suggested, should be governed by a board of trustees composed of ten men and five ladies. They recommended, too, that immediate steps be taken to incorporate and to obtain a charter.

The first Board of Trustees was named at the meeting, a group that included Mayor Lehr, Joseph E. Downing, James K. Mosser, William H. Yeager, William Douglass, H. W. Allison, James Bowen, Henry Leh, W. R. Lawfer, Robert E. Wright, Mrs. Louis Soleliac, Mrs. Edward B. Young, Mrs. Samuel A. Butz, Mrs. Harry C. Trexler, and Mrs. S. B. Anewalt. On January 4, 1893, Mrs. Young, Mr. Bowen, and Mr. Wright asked to be relieved of service. E. S. Shimer and Mrs. Mary L. Romig were named to fill two of the vacancies, but there is no record that the fifteenth member ever was elected. There is, however, some indication that Mr. Bowen may have reconsidered because his name remains on the list of the first Trustees of the Hospital. Mayor Lehr was named Chairman of the Board; Mr. Shimer was elected Secretary; and Mr. Allison was designated as the Treasurer. That the group believed a hospital could be established, was evidenced by the fact that a building committee was named, including James K. Mosser, Henry Leh, and W. R. Lawfer, and a rules committee, composed of Mr. Allison, Mr. Lawfer, and Mr. Mosser, was instructed to prepare regulations for the operation of the Hospital.

Offers of assistance were received at a meeting of the Board on January 16, 1893. The Women’s League volunteered part of the proceeds of a contemplated entertainment in Music Hall and the Emerald Dramatic Society asked permission to designate the proceeds of its play, “The Octoroon”, for the benefit of the new community project. Both offers were graciously accepted and the Trustees designated a special committee of its members to cooperate with the Dramatic Society in promoting ticket sales. Some of the proceeds, although the amount is not clear, were turned over to Treasurer Allison.

The last meeting of the subscribers to the Hospital recorded in the existing minutes was held on February 7, when they ratified the charter that had been granted the previous day in the Lehigh County Courts by Judge W. W. Schuyler of the Third Judicial District. In their petition, the subscribers expressed the desire to form a corporation for “the relief of human suffering by ministering to the wants of the sick and injured who may apply for such relief, without distinction of race, color, creed, or condition.” The subscribers, Dr. Hartzell, Dr. E. G. Martin, Dr. Charles Martin, Dr. W. P. Kistler, Dr. H. H. Herbst, and Dr. P. L. Reichard, were represented by Attorneys Samuel A. Butz and Reuben J. Butz. They informed the Court that there would be no capital stock and declared that the yearly income of the corporation would not exceed thirty thousand dollars a year.

Except for the prodding of a few physicians, an occasional reminder in one or two interested newspapers, and a public fund established by The Allentown Morning Call through the efforts of David A. Miller, one of its publishers, the project remained dormant for more than two years. The Morning Call, struggling for its own existence in a field dominated by evening newspapers, organized the first public appeal for support for the Hospital, and started the fund with its own contribution of twenty-five dollars. When the Allentown Hospital Association was formally organized in 1896, the newspaper, in spite of its then limited circulation, turned over the nearly $1,900 that had been collected through its efforts. Contributions, listed in its columns at least twice each week through the two years, included $116.71 from the motormen and conductors of the Lehigh Valley Traction Company, who gave the receipts of their annual ball; $179.45, representing the profits of an excursion by Adelaide Silk Mill workers to Mountain Park; a legacy from the estate of Barbara Schaadt; and gifts from Captain and Mrs. James L. Schaadt, Mr. and Mrs. John R. Gossler, John C. Bitterling, the Goodwill Fire Company, an unnamed lawyer, a woman who identified herself only as Mayme, J. H. Fink, the Red Ticket Day Food Exposition, income from the Allen Athletic Association’s Christmas putz, George C. Fry, J. Seegers Butz, the Royal Helpers of the King’s Daughters, the Lehigh Lodge of Odd Fellows, the Red Hawk Tribe of the Red Men, the Young Men’s Hebrew Literary Society, the Bijou Opera Company, the Sons of Union Veterans, the America Hose Company, the Young People’s Alliance of Ebenezer Evangelical Church, and the general committee of the Patriotic Order Sons of America.

The needs of the community could not be denied, however. Accordingly, the project was revived at another public meeting held at the Court House on October 16, 1895. It was this meeting, called by Mayor H. W. Allison, that provided the impetus for the organization of the Allentown Hospital Association and the founding of the Hospital. Although a newspaper account indicates that the court room was not crowded, it reports that “the numbers there were more than expected and in the audience were a number of women.”

Mayor Allison, who presided, reviewed some of the previous efforts to establish a hospital, indicating that the matter had been under discussion for at least sixteen years.

“The Morning Call started a fund themselves,” he said, “and has kept the matter before the people and has received some hundreds of dollars. Three years ago an organization was effected. I was the treasurer and received three hundred or four hundred dollars and deposited it with the Lehigh Valley Trust Company. Nothing further has been done except that The Morning Call Fund has been kept up.

“Three years ago several propositions were made with reference to purchasing or renting a building. Several buildings were thought of but the practical management perplexed the minds of those interested. The sustaining seemed harder than the starting. At the same time Easton started a hospital. The ladies held a fair. They bought an old building, got started, and today the Easton Hospital exists. I have always thought that if Easton could do it we could do it. If a warm feeling exists we can accomplish something. If not, we can do nothing.

“I believe a hospital is necessary in our midst. We have

grown to be a manufacturing city. Many are injured and could be taken care of in a hospital. Some say St. Luke’s is sufficient. If this is the sentiment, we can do nothing. To carry a wounded man five or six miles is a serious matter. If Easton can support a hospital, why can’t Allentown? The purpose of this meeting is to arouse interest and put the matter on a substantial basis.”

The Reverend John B. Maus, Rector of the Sacred Heart Roman Catholic parish, offered two propositions. He suggested that the community form a permanent organization chartered to build and own a hospital which it then could lease, for a suggested rental of one dollar a year, to the Sisters of Mercy. He offered to support any other plan which would appear to be better, but asked, that unless some definite proposal was approved, he be given encouragement to build a hospital to be operated by the Sisters of Mercy. Either plan, he said, called for the people of Allentown to provide the funds for building the Hospital.

Judge Edward Harvey also suggested immediate action:

"Some thirty years ago when I came here,” he said, “there was but one manufacturing industry in Allentown. Now there are many and they are diversified. When an accident happens, patients are treated at a doctor’s office or at home. Allentown is enterprising. I know there is a sentiment here to have a hospital and I know a number of gentlemen who will subscribe liberally. All that is needed is for leading men to take an active part. The maintenance should not depend entirely upon voluntary contributions. A good foundation is necessary so that those giving may feel certain of permanency. Economical management will be necessary. I am satisfied that the physicians will give their services without reward.

“The hospital should be maintained on broad lines, open to all regardless of nativity or residence. I don’t think we should get a private building. We are rich enough in Allentown to build a hospital that will adorn the town.”

There were a few more talks, a few more suggestions, a few more ideas from men such as Dr. H. H. Herbst, the Reverend R. H. Kline, Rector of Grace Episcopal Church, and Dr. E. M. Kistler. Then, at the suggestion of Judge Harvey, the assembly resolved: that the needs of the people of the city required the establishment and maintenance of a hospital; that the time was opportune for establishing it; and that a committee of fifteen be appointed to develop plans.

Mayor Allison, who by the resolution was required to be a member of the committee, named the following men as his associates; the Reverend John B. Maus, Rector of the Sacred Heart parish; the Reverend J. A. Singmaster, Pastor of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church; the Reverend George W. Richards, Pastor of Salem Reformed Church; Judge Harvey, Dr. W. H. Hartzell, Colonel Harry C. Trexler, Henry Cole, Leonard Sefing, James K. Mosser, W. R. Lawfer, Christian Swartz, Henry Leh, all prominent in the business life of the community; James Gallagher, a school teacher; and Attorney S. A. Butz. Mr. Mosser, Mr. Butz, and Mr. Swartz were unable to serve and Andrew Keck, John Gossler, and John Lentz were named in their stead.

Meeting ten days later, the committee discussed the proposals submitted by Father Maus, who again emphasized that if his suggestions were not accepted he would cheerfully favor any plans proposed. He made it clear, however, that if nothing was done he would make it his business to feel the pulse of the people during the winter and see what he could do about establishing a hospital.

The pattern for the Hospital was established when, by a vote of six to four on a motion to test sentiment, the committee “refused to entertain any proposal looking toward sectarian control of the hospital.” It was not until nearly twenty years later that the Sacred Heart parish, under the leadership of Monsignor Peter Masson, established the Hospital that bears its name and that serves both the members of the parish and the community at large. Opposing control of the city’s first hospital by any religious body were the Reverends Singmaster and Richards, Messrs. Sefing, Lawfer, Cole, and Leh. Father Maus, Judge Harvey, Dr. Hartzell, and Mr. Gallagher indicated by their vote that they had no objections.

Father Maus' sincerity in his promise of support was amply demonstrated by his service on the first Board of Trustees and its building committee, and by his tireless efforts to raise funds to establish the new institution. When he died in January 1899 the Board noted that “the Allentown Hospital Association has lost one of its most active and efficient members” and recorded its appreciation of “the commendable good he showed in the early efforts to secure a hospital for our city and the interest he displayed in the progress of the work.”

At its first meeting, the Committee of Fifteen also heard suggestions that the working people of the city be urged to follow the example of the employes of the John E. Lentz shoe factory and contribute a day’s wages to the Hospital that was to serve them. Judge Harvey, Father Maus, and Henry Leh were appointed to consider a site for the Hospital and immediately received a proposal

that the Association purchase for $15,000 the Hiram Leh property at Tenth and Walnut Streets, a residence with twenty-four rooms and a stable. Members of the committee visited the relatively new hospitals in Reading and Easton, making exhaustive studies of the steps that led to their establishment, their services, and their financing. They presented their findings to the committee on November 7 and the group, satisfied that Allentown could both establish and support a hospital, resolved that “immediately at the close of the next public meeting an effort be made to form an association of all persons promising to contribute ten dollars within ten days as a membership fee and five dollars each year after the first as annual dues, which association shall duly organize, adopt a constitution, and become incorporated for the purpose of founding and maintaining a hospital in this city.”

Suggestions of the committee were approved at another public meeting at the Court House on November 15, 1895 and a temporary organization was formed with Mayor Allison as Chairman, Mr. Gallagher as Secretary, and Mr. Lentz as Treasurer. First members of the Allentown Hospital Association, affiliating with it that evening by the payment of ten dollars each, were: Mayor Allison, Father Maus, the Reverends Singmaster and Richards, Judge Harvey, Dr. W. H. Hartzell, Colonel Trexler, Dr. Orlando Fegley, Messrs, Cole, Sefing, Gossler, Lawfer, Leh, Lentz, and Gallagher, Dr. H. H. Herbst, A. Samuels, Morris Silberstein, W. F. Schlechter, the Reverend Charles Hay, Frank Hersh, Sr., the Reverend T. L. Hacker, L. S. Jacoby, William Andrews, Dallas Dillinger, J. Harry Lawfer, C. F. Wolfertz, Solomon Weber, Morgan F. Medlar, W. B. K. Johnson, Dr. P. L. Reichard, Dr. C. D. Schaeffer, Dr. E. H. Dickenshied, Dr. Charles S. Martin, V. D. Barner, A. D. Dresher, Dr. C. J. Otto, W. R. Klein, Wilson J. Hartzell, Cyrus Kuntz, Dr. W. F. Cawley, M. J. Stephens, James L. Schaadt, Mrs. Anna Leisenring, Dr. John Lear, W. F. Good, John N. Lawfer, M. J. Lennon, the Reverend S. A. Repass, and F. B. Seabold.

The movement was thus under way. The following day the Master Plumbers of Allentown offered to contribute their services in the building of the Hospital and to provide some of the plumbing equipment at cost. The H. B. Yingling Brick Company offered one hundred dollars worth of bricks and a committee was organized in each of the city’s ten wards to solicit funds. When the organization meeting was held on December 13, Treasurer Lentz was able to report 226 paid up memberships at ten dollars each, additional subscriptions of fifty-five dollars, receipts of $19.12 from special offerings taken by St. Paul’s Lutheran and Zion Reformed Sunday Schools, and twenty-five dollars from the proceeds of a Thanksgiving Day football game. The Association had $2,359 in its treasury and there was $1,853.70 in the fund that had been collected by The Morning Call. Martin Klingler offered the services of the Allentown Band for a benefit concert and the association initiated plans for a community fair and bazaar.

Formal organization was effected that evening when the constitution was adopted establishing the organization as the Allentown Hospital Association and defining its purpose as “the founding and perpetual maintenance of a public hospital in the City of Allentown for relieving the wants of the afflicted who may be suffering from accident or acute disease, without distinction of race, color, creed, or condition.”

Membership was opened to any person contributing ten dollars at one time and five dollars annually during each succeeding year. Others who contributed ten dollars in cash or twenty-five dollars in material or merchandise were entitled to representation during the year in which their gift was received. Life members were those who contributed $150 at any one time. Some years later, the membership requirements were changed, defining members of the Association as those who contribute ten dollars a year and as life members those who give one thousand dollars at one time. The constitution also provided that the Association and the Hospital should be governed by a board of fifteen trustees elected from the membership, and that the trustees should elect the officers of the Association. Trustees were instructed, by constitutional provision, to obtain a charter; raise funds for the founding and maintenance of the Hospital; hold all real and personal property in the name of the Allentown Hospital Association; name personnel necessary to operate the Hospital; establish and promulgate rules; organize a ladies auxiliary; adopt any measure in harmony with the constitution that would advance the interests of the Hospital; and give a full accounting of their stewardship at every annual meeting of the Association.

First trustees, named at the organization meeting, included; Dr. W. H. Hartzell, John E. Lentz, the Reverends George W. Richards, John B. Maus, and J. A. Singmaster, for three years; Dr. Orlando Fegley, James F. Gallagher, Colonel Harry C. Trexler, H. S. Shimer, and Mayor H. W. Allison, for two years; Judge Edward Harvey, the Reverend J. A. Repass, Henry Leh, John A. Gossler, and James

F. Hunsicker, for one year.

The first board organized on December 19, 1895 by electing the Reverend Mr. Singmaster, President; Hiram S. Shimer, Vice-president; James F. Gallagher, Secretary; and John E. Lentz, Treasurer. Officers were reaffirmed when the Association was incorporated on January 20, 1896. The charter, granted in the Lehigh County Courts by Judge Edwin Albright, cites substantially the same objective as stated in the constitution, “the relief of human suffering by ministering to the wants of the sick and the injured who may apply to it for such relief, without distinction of race, creed, color, or condition.”

With the Association chartered, the Board organized, and an active ladies auxiliary that was formed in February 1896, in the field, activities increased during 1896. When the first annual meeting of the Association was held on January 12, 1897, President Singmaster and Treasurer Lentz were able to report a fund of $9,234, all but approximately $1,400 raised during the first year.

“Your board has not for one minute doubted the importance and the feasibility of establishing a hospital in this city,” President Singmaster told the members of the Association. “It regrets that no more has been accomplished than is shown in this report, yet it feels that the results achieved have not been inconsiderable. Besides accumulating nearly ten thousand dollars, the Board has acquired knowledge and experience that will be helpful in the future. Moreover, the way has been cleared for a more aggressive work during the year. It is hoped that the State Legislature during the present session will favor us with a substantial appropriation to assist us in the erection of a building. We also count upon the liberality of our citizens to sustain this beneficial enterprise.”

The most perplexing problem facing the Board at its eleven meetings during the first year was the selection of a site for the Hospital. Many proposals were received and all were thoroughly investigated by specially appointed committees. An early suggestion was the Mansion House property at Seventh and Walnut Streets, offered for $15,000. Father Maus suggested tracts on Tilghman Street between Fifth and Penn Streets, at the northeast corner of Fourth and Tilghman Streets, and at Fifth and Allen Streets, the latter owned by Salem Reformed Church and now the site of Dubbs Memorial Evangelical and Reformed Church. The Highland Cemetery Association offered to donate a tract adjoining its property, along what then was known as the Twelfth Street Pike. Colonel Trexler and several of his associates expressed willingness to contribute three acres of ground northwest of the Fairview Cemetery.

Thomas Steckel offered a site at Front and Gordon Streets for the annual payment to himself and his wife, during their life-time, of five per cent interest on $5,000. A tract on the east side of Eighth Street between Green and Washington also was considered.

Trustees themselves were interested in acquiring, either as a gift or for a nominal purchase price, the property known as “the reservoir tract,” believed to be the highest point in the city, now Allentown’s West Park. The city had purchased the ground with the intention of building a reservoir but later changed its plans and the plot was being used as a baseball diamond. Efforts to obtain it were, however, unsuccessful. Just before the annual meeting in January 1897, the Board received an offer from Henry Leh expressing his willingness to donate two acres of land at the northwest corner of Fourteenth and Union Streets. Although the proposition was regarded favorably both by the Trustees and by the Association, it was abandoned, principally because of difficulties involved in acquiring sufficient adjoining land and because of the high estimates on the cost of installing proper drainage facilities.

Meanwhile, the very desirable Solomon Griesemer tract at Seventeenth and Chew Streets was placed on the market, one of the conditions being that none of the lots would be sold for hospital purposes. Acting as individuals, Colonel Trexler, Henry Leh, Frank M. Trexler, and Hiram Shimer purchased the property, site of the present Hospital buildings, and in March 1897, transferred the deed to the Association. The land, bounded by Seventeenth Street, West Street, Gordon Street, and Chew Street, cost $5,297.51 and was paid for by the Ladies Auxiliary.

Finances were low, but hopes were high, as the Trustees moved to bring the dreams of years to fruition. Judge Harvey, the Reverend Mr. Richards, and Dr. Martin were named as a committee to study plans for raising the necessary funds and for erecting the building. Colonel Trexler, J. H. Pascoe, and Dr. C. S. Martin undertook the assignment of getting a state appropriation. The group that had incorporated in 1893 to establish a hospital met to dissolve and merge its interests with those of the new Association, turning over to it the $367 legacy from the estate of Barbara Schaadt. On every side there was action.

Architects were invited to submit plans for the building in open competition and four sets of drawings were studied by the Board. On September 28, 1897, the Trustees accepted the “English Colonial” style architecture proposed by Seymour Davis of Philadelphia. The plans projected a two-and-one-half story central administration building, sixty by eighty feet, and two wings each 573/2 feet by 195 feet. Seisholtzville granite and buff brick with King of Prussia marble trim were designated as the principal building materials. Mr. Davis was authorized to proceed with detailed plans for the central section and by the end of the year the specifications were complete.

Reports at the annual meeting on January 1, 1898 indicated that the Association had raised little more than $11,000 toward a project it was estimated would cost $30,000. That haste was essential, was indicated by the fact that although the State Legislature had appropriated $2,500 for each of the two years following June 1, 1897, the funds were earmarked for maintenance and would not be available until the Hospital was built. A building committee consisting of President Singmaster, James F. Hunsicker, W. H. Hartzell, William P. Moyer, and Father Maus was named on January 14, 1898 and a finance committee, composed of the Reverend Mr. Richards, Henry Leh, Judge Harvey, Abram Samuels, Dr. C. D. Schaeffer, and Dr. Orlando Fegley was appointed the following month. To the latter was given the responsibility of raising the needed funds.

Although James M. Ritter was awarded the construction contract on March 18, 1898 at his low bid of $16,242, he was not authorized to proceed with the work until May 13. Early in July, the building committee reported that the cellar walls were going up. The Spanish American War, which called many men from industrial plants and from the building trades, delayed construction. The building was completed and occupied, however, just in time to make the Hospital Association eligible for the five thousand dollar state appropriation. The appropriation, threatened because of delays, Was retained through the efforts of Walter L. Jones, Harry G. Stiles, and Dr. C. S. Martin.

There was no building fund campaign, but as construction progressed the finance committee and other trustees were busy raising the funds to pay for the work. On January 12, 1899, Treasurer Lentz reported cash resources of $1,370, with $7,000 more needed to pay for the balance of the construction. Trustees were busy, too, on other things. The committee on beds, for example, surveyed the field and decided upon a white enamelled iron bed “with three or four spindle head and foot ends, thirty-six inches wide, twenty-six inches high, and six feet three inches long.” They could be obtained, the committee found, at a cost of between $4.50 and $5.00 each, equipped with wire-woven springs, but with wooden plugs instead of casters. Pure African fibre mattresses cost $2.75 each, hair pillows $1.20 each, and goose feather pillows, $1.75 each.

The matter of selecting a competent staff was another problem, but before selecting the physicians and surgeons, the Trustees named James Heckman as janitor at a salary of $1.25 “per day for days worked”; appointed Annie B. Gibson as head nurse at a salary of thirty dollars a month, and Miss M. J. Yost of Bethlehem, and Laura Missimer of Allentown as assistant nurses at twenty dollars per month. Victor Wonderly was appointed the official undertaker, and Clara Fretz was engaged as cook at $2.50 per week.

The medical and surgical staff, discussed in detail in a later chapter, was not elected until May 12, ten days before the Hospital was opened. Suffice it to say here that Dr. Orlando Fegley was named the first Surgeon-in-chief, with Dr. C. D. Schaeffer, Dr. A. J. Yost, Dr. Daniel Hiestand, and Dr. R. E. Albright as Assistant Surgeons; Dr. W. H. Hartzell as Physician-in-chief, with Dr. C. S. Martin, Dr. H. H. Herbst, Dr. C. J. Otto, and Dr. I. F. Huebner as assistants. Dr. George F. Seiberling was elected Ophthalmologist and Dr. M. F. Cawley was appointed Pathologist. Because of illness, Dr. Fegley was unable to assume his duties and Dr. C. D. Schaeffer served as the first Surgeon-in-chief, a post he held in combination with others for twenty-three years.

The thirty-bed hospital, ready for occupancy on May 22, included an operating room, twenty-three beds for ward patients, two cribs, five private rooms, a bed in the receiving ward, and living accommodations for a dozen employes. It represented an investment of $29,396.50, including $5,296 for land, $20,243.63 for the building and improvements to the grounds, and $3,856.36 for furnishings and supplies. The community had been alerted to the need during 1898 and 1899, and by gifts ranging from $1.25 to $2,000 had made it possible to open the institution free of debt. At the end of the first six months of operations, during which payrolls and monthly expenses involved in the care of the first 168 patients totalled $3,291.02, the Treasurer was able to report a cash balance of $2,764.96.

“Your Board has not needed to borrow at all,” President Singmaster was able to report at the annual meeting in January 1900. “We have paid every bill promptly. The Hospital is today without debt. This is quite unprecedented in the history of such institutions and speaks well for the Association and the patrons of the Hospital. But it must not be forgotten that we have drawn upon the future to the extent of $3,750 by using the state appropriation at once.

The amount really represents the present needs of the Hospital, which ought to be donated by our wealthier citizens. Money has come to us in many ways and always just in time. We trust that the same spirit of benevolence that has supported this noble charity hitherto will sustain it in time to come.”

There were gifts from many sources, individuals and business firms, churches, lodges, and societies. The list covers at least six pages of fine type in the report for the first six months of the Hospital’s organization. Detailing a meeting of the Ladies Auxiliary held one week before the opening The Morning Call reports:

“On that afternoon the ladies gave $800 and several physicians gave $100. One of the jewelers gave all the silverware and cutlery that will be needed. A crockery company has decided to give all the dishes, including an elegant dinner set.

A lady gave a dining room table and chairs. Another crockery company is expected to donate glassware. A number of grocers have volunteered to give groceries. These should be sent to the Hospital on Friday and such contributions should include such articles as would be used in a regular household. The Hospital boxes are receiving liberal contributions. The Turf Club decided to hold five races Monday afternoon at the Fairgrounds for the benefit of the Hospital. The linens and muslin prepared by the Ladies Auxiliary filled two large freight wagons.”

Saturday afternoon before the opening, Cadwalader Biddle and Dr. McCloud of Philadelphia, representing the State Board of Charities, visited the Hospital and made a formal inspection of the facilities. “They expressed themselves as highly pleased with the entire institution, particularly so with the interior arrangement,” a contemporary chronicler reports.

There were times during the decade of dreaming and planning, working and scheming, when the goal was clear and when it was obscure, when hopes were high and when the project was all but abandoned. Those who had the vision to persist, whose self-sacrificing labors were so frequently referred to by President Singmaster, who by gifts large and small made a dream come true, were rewarded when the Hospital opened on May 22. The account of the opening is taken from the report of one of the institution’s first and most consistent friends through a half-century, The Morning Call:

“The doors of the Allentown Hospital were opened yesterday and quite a large number of visitors were there to inspect the building. There were good words spoken on all sides and the Hospital when fully completed will compare with any of its size in the state.

“Although the entire building is not yet altogether finished, there are enough rooms finished to allow the work to be carried on without interruption. These wards are now ready for patients: two women’s wards, one furnished by the Mayor and Mrs. James L. Schaadt located at the southwest corner, and another, the W. P. Huber ward containing four beds and two cribs, located at the southeast corner; male ward and isolating room. The private rooms also are in readiness.

“There are still a great many things needed. Chief among them are a rug for the dining room, rugs for the nurses’ rooms, groceries, anything used in a private family. Brooms are also in demand and it is hoped that a broom factory will donate a dozen. These few articles enumerated do by no means include all that is needed. There are a large number of other things, but it is hoped that these can be purchased with the proceeds of the strawberry and ice cream festival which the Ladies Auxiliary will hold on Kleppinger’s lawn on North Sixth Street on Thursday evening.”

The Allentown Hospital, firmly established in keeping with the thoroughly conservative but progressive spirit of the community, thus was launched on its career of service that now has reached the half-century mark.

“We do not hesitate to say, after somewhat extended observation,” President Singmaster announced, “that our Hospital is unsurpassed by any of its size in the State of Pennsylvania. The homeless and friendless have here found healing, and poor widows have in several instances found willing hands to smooth their dying pillows.”

The ideals of the founders formed the pattern that has been followed as the institution expanded both its physical plant and its services. It is safe to assume that they will continue to be its guide.

TESTING TIME 1899 TO 1924

TT "THEN the Hospital opened its doors, Trustees were cer-\/V/ tain that they had built well and that the foundations of the new institution were sound. They had plumbed public sentiment to determine need. They had moved cautiously and had built conservatively, refusing to incur debt. They had exercised most thorough care in the selection of the Staff and in choosing other operating personnel. They were ready to submit their accomplishments to the judgment of time.

They were just as certain, however, that their task was not ended. They knew they had established a public trust, a continuing responsibility, a lasting opportunity for every altruistic element in the life of the community to merge in the most noble endeavor of them all — the strengthening and sustaining of human life.

The Hospital they founded was owned by the people of the community through a non-profit association formed to perpetuate that public ownership. The way was permanently open to all who, regardless of other affiliations, were willing to participate in sharing its responsibilities, guiding its development, and directing its management through their gifts, their work, and their membership in the Association. That privilege has never been withdrawn.

Hospitals, because they were relatively few at the turn of the century, frequently were suspect. Far from being recognized as diagnostic centers, they existed in the public mind principally for the care of the injured, for those so critically ill that surgery or medication outside of the home was a last resort, and for those who had no homes or no kin to nurse them. It was not until fifteen years after the Allentown Hospital was established that Dr. DaCosta of the Jefferson Hospital and Medical School in Philadelphia was able to observe: 1

“At the present time the public has faith in hospitals. Persons no longer hesitate to go to one. A surgical patient expects to go. A medical patient usually acquiesces when advised to go. After one experience, an obstetric case regards a maternity hospital as a boon. Growing trust has bred a growing demand for more hospitals. The many hospitals which during recent years have arisen in the smaller cities and towns, and in the country districts, indicate an increased public knowledge of and appreciation of such institutions. A few years ago only cities of considerable size had hospitals. Small towns practically never had them. One might travel for many miles, even in New England and in the Middle States, without seeing a single hospital. Now, in the East and in many sections of the South and the West, nearly every prosperous town has an excellent hospital which is a focus of medical and surgical effort for a large region of the country.”

The record seems to indicate, however, that the community readily accepted the Allentown Hospital and approved of the services it offered, even in its earliest years. During the first six months of its existence it admitted 168 patients who filled an average of twelve beds a day, and it provided 2,789 days of hospital care. Its peak census in 1899 was twenty-one, leading President Singmaster to warn that “an emergency arising from accident or an epidemic will fill the Hospital to overflowing.” The following year, its first full year of operation, it cared for 380 patients, an average of eighteen a day, with twenty-seven of its beds occupied at one time. In that year, 294 patients were admitted for surgical treatment and 102 for medical care. Dr. C. D. Schaeffer and his associates on the Surgical Staff performed eleven appendectomies, reduced some sixty fractures, and treated seventy wound cases, among them five that were the result of gunshot. Medical cases included twenty-four typhoid fever patients, nine who were ill with influenza, and eleven who were suffering from rheumatism. The average patient stayed 19.35 days and the Hospital provided 6,465 days of care at an average cost of $1.09 per day, a reduction of six cents per day from the costs during the first six months. That was during a period when meat, supplied on a contract basis by E. J. Rapp, cost the Hospital twelve cents per pound.

“Golden opinions are expressed by visitors and patients concerning the beauty and the comfort of the buildings, the courtesy of the servants, the kindness of the nurses, and the skill of the doctors,” President Singmaster told members of the Association as he reviewed the year 1900. “In no way does the Hospital suffer by comparison with the best of similar institutions. The Hospital building, after a trial of a year and a half, has been found well adapted to the measure of the work attempted. We have accommodations for thirty patients. On several occasions our capacity was put to the test, admonishing us that an epidemic or disaster would find our present room quite inadequate.”

Within little more than a year after the Hospital was opened, Trustees knew that the original building could not long meet the demands the community was making for the services of the new institution. They recognized this on November 9, 1900 when they appointed Judge Harvey, Dr. Schaeffer, and Treasurer E. H. Ren-inger to study the feasibility of erecting the first of the two wings proposed in the initial design. Plans for the west wing were presented to the Board on March 8, 1901 by Jacoby and Weishampel, Allentown architects, and approved in detail the following month. The contract was awarded on June 6, 1901, after James K. Mosser, a Trustee, pledged to pay the entire cost of construction, then estimated at $33,000 but increased to $39,773 by the time the building was completed in June 1902. Ground was broken within a few days and Contractor Joseph F. Martz began work on the unit that added forty-five beds to the Hospital’s original thirty and provided additional accommodations for the increasing number of student nurses entering the School of Nursing that had been established in November 1899.

Mr. Mosser, active in stimulating the movement for a public hospital in the city that was the center of his extensive tanning interests, had given generously toward the erection of the first Hospital building. His second major contribution was given without solicitation and with the request that his name be withheld. Not until the building was dedicated on June 30, 1902, was he revealed as the donor.

“I am free to say,” Treasurer Reninger stated as he presented the completed building to the Trustees on behalf of Mr. Mosser, “that as he purposed in his heart, so has he given; not grudgingly as a duty, nor with the hope of a present or future reward — not for any anticipated applause from his fellow men — not for any personal gratification — but purely and simply for the assistance that might thus be rendered in the alleviation of human suffering in the community.”

“No nobler motive could actuate a generous giver,” Judge Harvey said in accepting the building. “A beneficence devoted to the alleviation of human suffering is the practical application of the Divine Socialism that has guided the civilized world since the scene on Calvary. And it is the proud distinction of our civilization that under it alone these charitable and eleemosynary institutions were first erected and supported.”

Other friends of the Hospital, individuals and organizations, contributed the furnishings for the male and female surgical wards, the children’s ward, the male and female surgical dressing rooms, the seven private rooms, the four isolating rooms, and the three pantries that were included in the new unit. Noting the gifts, Judge Harvey said they represented “the love and the interest of our people for and in the institution.”

By the end of 1904, when the admissions for the year indicated that the Hospital had provided 19,607 days of care for a daily average of 53.5 patients, it again became necessary to add to the physical plant. This time Mrs. Maria E. Mosser, widow of James K. Mosser, contributed $4,371 for the erection of a women’s ward as an annex to the unit built by her husband. The Board, from other sources and by borrowing for the first time, raised more than $15,000 to build and equip a new boiler house, coal house, and laundry, and to construct the covered corridor that connects them with the main building. Both projects were completed in 1905. They made it possible for the Hospital to announce facilities for the care of eighty-seven patients. The following year, however, it admitted 899 patients, cared for an average of sixty-two per day, and reached a high point of eighty-one in a single day. The capacity was increased to one hundred beds in 1907 when temporary quarters were provided for nurses outside the Hospital buildings. Additional accommodations were provided for nurses when the Oscar Roth property, at 1611 Chew Street, was purchased in 1910.

During the first ten years of its service to the community, the Hospital admitted 7,929 patients and, as it observed its tenth anniversary, it was caring for an average of seventy-two per day. It had, however, reached a peak of 102 patients on a single day and again was compelled to look for additional facilities. Need for a new building, the east wing that had been projected more than a decade before when the original plans were drawn, was intensified by the fact that an increasing number of obstetrical cases were being admitted and the facilities for their proper care were not adequate. Although there was no delivery room and no nursery, sixty-seven babies had been born in the Hospital since the first obstetrical patient was admitted in 1901. Better accommodations for children also were essential. Urgent as they knew the need to be, the Trustees felt compelled to wait until they had a minimum of $50,000 earmarked for the project. Late in 1908 they began asking subscriptions and in October 1910, when approximately $70,000 had been subscribed, they authorized construction of the three-story building, according to plans prepared by Ruhe and Lange. The contract was awarded to W. H. Gangewere and the building was completed in the Spring of 1912 at a cost of $114,371. Furnishings, largely the gifts of friends, added another $23,000 to the cost.

The new unit added seventy-five beds to the one hundred in the central building and the west wing, again almost doubling the Hospital’s capacity. Medical and surgical wards for women were located on the first floor, private rooms on the second floor, and the children’s ward and the new obstetrical department on the third floor. The central area of what now is the fourth floor of the building also was completed to house the diet kitchens. Roof garden areas, one section under canvas and the other enclosed by sliding glass panels, were used during pleasant weather by convalescing patients. It was not until 1927 that the fourth floor of the building was completed.

Adjustments within the three units of the plant provided more living accommodations for nurses and, within two years after the east wing was opened, gave the Hospital a capacity for 195 patients. The buildings and their equipment, Judge Harvey told the Hospital Association in 1912 in his final report as President, represented an investment of more than $300,000. As the plant was being developed, he pointed out, 12,198 patients were treated and $329,513 was spent for maintenance. The average cost for a day’s hospital care when the east wing was opened was $1.74.

In 1914, when the Hospital was fifteen years old, it was caring for an average of 120 patients a day and its annual admissions exceeded 2,000. Through the first fifteen years, the average length of time a patient spent in the Hospital had climbed from 16.6 days in 1899, to 28.8 days in 1908 and had dropped again to twenty-two days in 1914. The rate for care in private rooms was four dollars a day and charges for private nursing, furnished at the option of the patient, were specified not to exceed four dollars. Ward accommodations were charged at the rate of one dollar a day and semi-private rooms cost the patient two dollars.

Reviewing the accomplishments of the Hospital when the Chamber of Commerce inspected the institution on June 3, 1914, in connection with its fifteenth anniversary, Dr. C. D. Schaeffer made this report:

“Since the opening of the institution to January 1914, we have treated 13,933 patients with a general mortality of 6.3. We performed 8,441 operations with a mortality of 2.1 per cent. Seventy-three per cent of the patients were treated without charge for board, nursing, or professional services. From January 1914 to May 1, 1914 we treated 874 patients with a mortality of 5.3 per cent at a cost of maintenance of $1.27 per patient per day, which, according to Bromley Wharton, Secretary of the State Board of Charities, is lower than in any other institution in this Commonwealth. These results are obtained through the present management, which consists of a physician and surgeon-in-chief and director, assistant physicians and surgeons, X-ray operator, pathologist, resident physicians, directress of nurses, assistant directress of nurses, night directress, clinic nurse, and dietitian. Each one of these has charge of a department for which they are held responsible. In addition, we have forty-three nurses and nineteen servants.

“We not only maintained and treated 14,697 house patients, but we erected and equipped this wing and improved the interior of the old building. What institution is there in our city or community with an equal record? What hospital in similar conditions and circumstances is there in this Commonwealth that can boast of greater success?

“You have done wonders and the eyes of adjacent cities are on you. When it became evident that additional accommodations were needed you enabled me to secure subscriptions amounting to almost seventy thousand dollars within one month, and before its completion, some of you agreed to furnish the various wards, private rooms, dressing rooms, etc., the sum total of which amounted to a little over twenty thousand dollars; so that within the period of one year you not only maintained the institution, but you also subscribed in that same year about ninety thousand dollars for improvements; or in other words, over one hundred thousand dollars was subscribed in one year for this charity alone, an amount which speaks volumes for our community.”

He asked the business men of the community to note, also, as they passed through the Hospital, that each patient had been provided with an individual drinking cup, thermometer, and brush and comb box. The purchase of these items was considered so important that it required special action by the Board of Trustees.

Reporting to the Lehigh County Court a month later, a board of visitors, appointed by Judge Clinton A. Groman, said they found the institution so well equipped that they could not suggest improvements beyond those that were contemplated. They told the Court that the patients who were questioned regarding the treatment they were receiving, all expressed satisfaction.

“This city may well be proud of having one of the best-equipped and managed institutions in the state or country,” the visitors said. Members of the Board, headed by David A. Miller, included Lucy J. Collins, Mrs. A. Samuels, Rose M. Crilly, Francis M. Berkemeyer, Mary Stewart, F. A. Fetherolf, and Annie E. Leisenring. They also visited St. Luke’s Hospital, which at that time had seventy-eight patients compared with 123 they found in the Allentown Hospital; the State Hospital at Rittersville, caring for 922 mental patients; the Good Shepherd Home, the Children’s Home in Salisbury Township, the Lehigh County Prison, the County Home, the Rescue Mission, the Day Nursery and Children’s Home, the Open Air School, the Home of the American Volunteers, the Phoebe Home, and the Mennonite Home at Coopersburg.

One year later, Dr. Charles P. Emerson2 reported that of the 2,600 hospitals in the United States for acute medical and surgical patients, only 8.4 per cent had as many beds as the Allentown Hospital. In population, however, Allentown was the one hundred and second city in the country, standing between Portland, Maine, with 62,161 and Charleston, S. C., with 60,121. In Pennsylvania, there were 160 hospitals receiving state aid and in size, perfection of construction, efficiency of management, and public confidence, the Allentown Hospital stood high, according to Dr. DaCosta.

W. S. Woertman, College and Hospital Representative of the J. B. Lippincott Publishing Company, visited the Hospital in 1914 and wrote this letter to the Board:

“I made it a point to go through all the new hospitals in the cities I visited in North America this past year and I only found two things that could be criticized about your equipment, they being criticisms that are to be provided for, namely the nurses’ home and an operating building. Aside from that I can find nothing but congratulations for you in having such a wonderful little hospital. I know of no city in this country of your size that has a hospital anywhere near as good.”

Three more major expansion moves were undertaken during the first quarter-century: the erection of the Edward Harvey Memorial Nurses’ Home, built during 1914 on the plot at the southeast corner of Seventeenth and Chew Street, which had been purchased for that purpose in 1903; the purchase of the O. O. Ziegler property at the southwest corner in 1918 and its development as an isolation unit; and the construction of the two-story X-ray and laboratory building completed early in 1921, and connected with the old central unit. The three properties provided more breathing space for the expanding activities of the Hospital and gave it accommodations, temporarily at least, for nearly one hundred more patients. The need for the nurses’ home and the magnificent bequest from Judge Harvey that made its construction possible, is discussed in detail in the chapter dealing with the School of Nursing. Here it need only be said that when completely furnished, it represented an investment of more than $111,000. The Ziegler property, extending 219 feet along Seventeenth Street and 260 feet along Chew Street, was purchased for $60,000 and equipped as an isolation hospital for the care of contagious diseases. In April 1920, less than a month after the death of Mayor A. L. Reichenbach, a group of his friends undertook to raise the $30,000 needed to liquidate the mortgage on the property and it was designated in his honor as the Reichenbach Memorial. During 1920 and 1921, the building was used by the government for the hospitalization of veterans of the First World War, but then was restored to use as an isolation building until it became an annex to the nurses’ home in 1931. It continues to be used as a residence for student nurses. The X-ray and laboratory building, which cost $23,000, housed the two departments until late in 1948 when a new structure was erected for the various units of the X-ray Department. The older building is now occupied entirely by the expanded pathology laboratories.

Although the report for 1904 indicates that the Hospital treated 104 “out patients”, it was not until 1918 that the Dispensary was established. From June 1, 1918 to May 31, 1920, the period covered in the first biennial report by Dr. Warren H. Butz, Chief of the Department, it provided 3,853 treatments for 756 different patients whose ailments included fractures and dislocations, sprains and burns, wounds of all descriptions, abscesses and carbuncles, ulcers and blisters, dog bites and insect stings, vaccinations and blood tests, diseases of the ear and eye, and a host of conditions that required medical rather than surgical care. As specialties were developed, separate clinics were established in the Out-patient Department which today includes twenty-four separate services, generally under the supervision of the Chief of that division in the Hospital.

Caring for an average of 156 patients a day in 1917, the Hospital was hard-pressed when the War Department took over the Fairgrounds for training the United States Army Ambulance Corps. It cooperated, however, in providing hospitalization and rented its isolation ward and its basement reserve ward to the government

at a flat rate of $150 per month. The arrangement continued from November 8, 1917 to August 1918 when the Hospital assumed the care of men from Camp Crane at a per diem rate. Camp surgeons and physicians attended their own men in the Hospital. During the influenza epidemic in 1918, more then 700 patients were hospitalized with various forms of the malady and cots overflowed into the nurses’ home when they no longer could be crowded into rooms and corridors. Nearly one hundred died from the disease, but more than six hundred were cured.

The Hospital purchased its first ambulance in 1916 and erected a garage to house it. When the proposal to purchase the ambulance for $3,000 was presented to the Board of Trustees on October 16, 1916, eleven Board members immediately subscribed $1,050. Three days later $3,495 had been raised.

In spite of pressure from several sources, both professional and lay, the Trustees insisted that ultimate responsibility for the treatment of patients admitted to the Hospital be vested in a small and compact staff of physicians and surgeons, thoroughly experienced in their respective fields. Physicians referring private patients to the Hospital were urged to visit them regularly and were invited to observe operations. Charts were open to them and the complete record of each case was made available to them when their patients were discharged. Various studies were made and some hearings were held but, until 1924, supreme authority for prescribing and administering treatment and care was given to the Physician and Surgeon-in-chief and his associates. The Staff, augmented as new departments were established, was sharply increased when the so-called “open staff” plan was adopted in 1924.

The attitude of the Board, during the Hospital’s quarter-century testing time, is probably best expressed in this action, taken when a bill seeking to mandate the “open staff” policy in hospitals receiving state appropriations was introduced into the Pennsylvania Legislature in 1915:

“Resolved that the Board of Directors of the Allentown Hospital Association, following the lead of other similar progressive institutions in the State, unanimously disapproves of the bill introduced into the Legislature relating to the government of hospitals supported in part by the state, making them accessible and open to physicians and permitting them to use the various departments for their patients without responsibility; and we desire to express our belief that this will not promote the best interests of either hospital or patient.”

After inspecting all hospitals receiving state aid in 1916 visitors named by the State Bureau of Medical Education and Licensure reported to Governor Brumbaugh that “in some smaller cities it was frequently observed that any and every physician in the community was allowed to bring patients to the hospital and perform major operations, involving life, without any regard to the competency of the physician, and even without consultation.” The criticism did not apply to the Allentown Hospital.

Dr. George T. Ettinger, Dean of Muhlenberg College, who at no time was associated with the Hospital in an official capacity, answered criticism that sometimes was both sharp and bitter with this statement to members of the Chamber of Commerce during the inspection tour in 1914:

“With all the men and women who have made the Allentown Hospital possible there is none deserving more credit than Dr. C. D. Schaeffer. Can you point to any establishment that has been doing more good than the Allentown Hospital? Shall we now largely for personal reasons refuse to give it the support it deserves? Is not jealousy the underlying motive in the opposition? No one feels jealous of the fellow beneath.

If the medical profession wants to live up to the high ideals it advertises, then it is their duty to support the Hospital. If the method of running it is not right, it is time to change it; but the system seems to be a workable one. If it is wrong, it is the duty of the Board of Trustees to rectify it and if it is not wrong, it is the duty of some to keep quiet.

“The majority settles things in American life and our submission to the majority is a magnificent tribute. If our candidate for President is defeated we come up smiling and call the successful one our President. We are proud of our country and the American principle holds good here. If the authorities find the present way is the proper one to conduct the Hospital, each one of us should support it and not all try to be captains, majors, and generals. Too many of us instead of giving service are looking out for ourselves. The splendid leadership we have here has developed the institution while it developed itself. You cannot develop an institution without a man. After going through the Hospital you will readily agree that this community does not know what it has in our Hospital and as we go hence I hope we may all feel a deeper interest in it than before.”

There was incontrovertible evidence that the Allentown Hospital was providing facilities that were comparable with the best in the country, when the American College of Surgeons surveyed it in 1920, according to standards that had been adopted in 1918. The Hospital immediately was placed on the approved list of the

American College of Surgeons and has remained there, with complete approval, since that time. Standards that must be met to achieve and maintain approval are:

“1. A modern physical plant, free from hazards, and properly equipped for the comfort and scientific care of the patient.

“2. Clearly stated constitution, by-laws, rules, and regulations setting forth organization, duties, responsibilities, and relations.

“3. A carefully selected governing board having complete and supreme authority for the management of the institution.

“4. A competent chief executive officer or administrator, well trained in all phases of hospital administration, with authority and responsibility to interpret and carry out the policies of the hospital as authorized by the governing board.

“5. An adequate number of efficient personnel, properly organized and under competent supervision.

“6. An organized medical staff of ethical, competent physicians for the efficient care of patients and for carrying out the professional policies of the hospital, subject to the approval of the governing board.

“7. Adequate diagnostic and therapeutic facilities with efficient technical service under competent medical supervision.

“8. Accurate and complete medical records, promptly written and filed in an accessible manner so as to be available for study, reference, follow-up, and research.

“9. Group conferences of the administrative staff and of the medical staff to review regularly and thoroughly their respective activities in order to keep the service and the scientific work on the highest plane of efficiency.

“10. A humanitarian attitude in which the best care of the patient is always the primary consideration.”

Additional and specific standards cover clinical laboratories, X-ray departments, departments of anaesthesia, obstetrics, ear, eye, nose, throat, fractures, cancer clinics, physical therapy departments, out-patient departments, pharmacies, nursing, dietary departments, medical social service, and medical libraries. In each field, the Allentown Hospital meets or surpasses the high standards that have been set.

Hard-pressed through the first twenty years of its history by the continually increasing demands for its services, the Hospital was given a brief respite when the Sacred Heart Hospital, established in 1912 by the late Monsignor Peter Masson in the rectory of the Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, opened its first major hospital building in 1919. Opening of the Baer Hospital in 1920, primarily for obstetrical patients, provided additional rooms and accommodations until it was closed in 1947. From a high of 3,618 patients admitted during 1917, the Allentown Hospital dropped to 2,440 in 1919. The following year, when it admitted 2,606 patients, it began what has been an almost uninterrupted climb to the peaks reached during the fiscal years of 1947 and 1948, in each of which it admitted more than 13,600 patients and gave a record high of more than 150,000 days of hospital care.

In the quarter-century of its testing period it admitted 41,949 patients; gave 872,719 days of hospital care; spent approximately a half-million dollars building and developing its facilities; established itself among the best of the nation’s hospitals; and justified the hopes and dreams of those who founded and nurtured it as it secured its place in the hearts of the people and the community it was created to serve.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS COMPOUNDED 1924 TO 1949

"TUST as clearly as the opening of the Hospital in 1899 delin-I eated a new era in Allentown’s concept of responsibilities and J opportunities in the area of health and the sphere of charity, so the beginning of the second quarter-century in 1924 inaugurated a new epoch in its career of service to the community in which it had become such a vital factor.

The line is sharp and the two periods are distinct. They are unified only by the principles and the ideals enunciated in the constitution and the charter and by a common determination to build within the community a hospital of which its people could be everlastingly proud because of the service it would be able to render.

During the first quarter-century, it was a closed hospital with a small staff to which all patients were referred. In 1924, new bylaws were adopted enlarging the staff, creating new departments, and permitting other qualified physicians and surgeons to use its facilities for the treatment of their private patients. Under the new rules, the patient became the responsibility of his own physician or surgeon. Under the old regulations, he was the patient of the Hospital.

Through its first twenty-five years, the Hospital cared for 41,949 patients at a cost that ranged from a low of $1.07 per day in 1901 and 1902, to $3.70 in 1923. Admissions increased almost five times during the next quarter-century, when nearly 200,000 patients were treated and maintained at a cost that increased steadily from $3.66 per day in 1924, to $9.25 per day during the first eight months of the fiscal year that began June 1, 1948.

In 1899, when the thirty-bed Hospital registered its first patient, its plant represented an investment of $30,000. As it entered upon its second twenty-five years, it had a capacity of considerably more than two hundred patients and on a single day had counted 204 occupied beds. Its assets were approximately $1,000,000 and, although it had been hard-pressed to meet mounting maintenance costs and to provide necessary buildings and equipment, it again was debt free. Today, with another period of indebtedness ended, its buildings and equipment, after allowances for depreciation, are valued conservatively at $1,578,832 and its total assets are $3,694,136.

By the time it reached its quarter-century mark, the School of Nursing which had been established in 1899, had graduated 270 nurses and had reached an enrollment of eighty-eight students. During the next twenty-five years, it graduated 903 nurses. The present student body numbers 187 young women preparing to enter the nursing profession.

There were twelve employes when the Hospital was opened: three graduate nurses, four student nurses, and five who were classified as “help”. Today’s payroll of 444 includes a superintendent and two assistants; a director of nursing, two assistants, and 173 graduate nurses; eighteen laboratory technicians and assistants; five X-ray technicians and assistants; eighteen secretaries and clerks; four telephone operators; and 220 maintenance and domestic employes. The kitchens and dining rooms alone require a staff of seventy-five, not including dietitians, and the laundry employs thirty-three. There are thirty-three orderlies and janitors, thirty-seven ward maids, seven painters and carpenters, seven firemen, one electrician, one plumber, and others in miscellaneous categories. Nursing care, maintenance, and daily routine operations of the Hospital involve 631 persons, exclusive of physicians and surgeons.

Admissions during the first year of the second quarter-century, when Allentown’s population approximated 80,000, totalled 3,381 and the Hospital is recorded as having cared for a daily average of 142 patients. In 1947, when it reached the high point of its first fifty years, it admitted 13,687 patients, gave 152,057 days of hospital care to an average of 391 persons per day, and had a peak day on which 495 patients jammed its wards, its private rooms, its solar-iums, and, on some floors, even the corridors. The population of Allentown in that year was estimated at 103,000.

James F. Hunsicker, President of the Board of Trustees when the new era began, was deeply conscious of the community s increasing demands for hospitalization, part of which were being met by the Sacred Heart Hospital and the Baer Hospital. Urging members of the Hospital Association, at their annual meeting in 1924, to give “serious thought to the present and future needs of the institution,” he told them that the Hospital was by no means complete. He described it as “a constantly growing and developing hospital,” and appealed for the support not only of its affiliated organizations, but also of the community as a whole.

Just one year later, Dr. S. D. Goldwater, Superintendent of New York’s Mount Sinai Hospital and a nationally recognized authority in his field, was commissioned to make a detailed study of the Hospital’s physical needs in relation to community requirements, as far as they could be anticipated. His recommendations revealed that with approximately four hundred beds in the city’s two major hospitals, two hunded more were needed. They resulted in the erection of the service building, the construction of a new west wing adjoining the front section of the Mosser Memorial, and the enclosing of the east wing roof garden to add a fourth floor to that unit. Funds for the new construction, completed at a cost of $828,141, were obtained through a community solicitation that raised $635,000 against a goal of $600,000, the highest objective of any public subscription campaign held in Allentown up to that time.

Work on the two-story service building, designed by Ruhe and Lange and erected by the Ochs Construction Company, was started in the summer of 1926, and was completed in time for a public inspection on Thanksgiving Day of the following year. Built at a cost of $220,439 and equipped at an additional expense of $18,446, the new unit gave the Hospital five modern operating rooms and auxiliary facilities, including special rooms for eye, ear, nose, and throat surgery, for orthopedic work, and for cystoscopic procedures. New and spacious kitchens to prepare the 400,000 meals the Hospital served its patients and employes that year, were located in the basement. Dining rooms for nurses, employes, and staff occupied the first floor.

New construction involved in adding the fourth floor to the east wing cost $39,404, including furnishings. Completed in 1927, it was designed to care for respiratory cases in accordance with the practices and techniques of twenty years ago. Installation of new boilers to provide heat for the expanded plant involved another expenditure of $27,423.

The west wing, which replaced part of the Mosser Memorial and extended the Hospital buildings north on Seventeenth Street, added 137 rooms and cost $522,426, including $56,916 for furnishings and equipment. Work was started in August 1927 by Butz and

Clader, and the six-story unit was dedicated on November 24, 1928 after nearly a week of public visitation. It provided accommodations for clinics on the ground floor, for a complete children’s unit on the second floor, for private rooms on the third and fourth floors, and for the Obstetrical Department, with modern delivery rooms and nurseries, on the fifth and sixth floors.

The buildings, designed by Ruhe and Lange and erected under the supervision of a Trustee committee headed by the late E. N. Kroninger, were substantial. That they were well-planned and carefully constructed is indicated by the fact that twenty years later they are still considered to be modern.

“The new service building,” The Morning Call reported when the two units were dedicated, “is declared to be the finest in the world; the new patient building is the equal of anything in any Hospital. The rooms are like those of a high class, modern hotel, with baths and showers.”

Dr. Goldwater and Judge Claude T. Reno were the speakers at the dedication, the latter emphasizing that the new buildings would prove to be among the most useful in the community. He spoke of the Hospital’s “dual mission to cure the sick and teach mercy,” pointing out that behind the advances contributed by science and invention “is the driving force of religious impulse and training.” The Hospital, he declared, is the result of that impulse. Attorney Fred B. Gernerd, President of the Board of Trustees during the fund raising campaign and the building program, presided at the dedicatory exercises held in the auditorium of the Harvey Memorial.

The year in which the buildings were completed to expand the Hospital’s capacity to 325 beds, it admitted 5,510 patients who stayed an average of twelve days each. The daily average cared for was 206, an increase of sixty-four in five years. Costs had increased to $3.91 per patient per day. Hospital payroll accounts show that there were twenty supervisory nurses and forty-nine domestic employes, in addition to the 117 student nurses.

It was not until late in 1926, when the Hospital was twenty-seven years old, that it admitted its fifty thousandth patient. Less than nine years later, on July 18, 1935, Mrs. Roger Peacock of Allentown was registered as Patient Number One Hundred Thousand and, within a few hours, her daughter, Ann Jane Peacock, started the roster of the second hundred thousand. In that fiscal year, 7,411 patients were admitted to the Hospital and it provided 93,849 days of care at an average cost of $3.90 per day.

It then was caring for an average of 256 patients per day whose stay in the Hospital had been reduced to twelve days and, although its capacity was listed as 325 beds, including twenty-five bassinets, it had as many as 332 patients on a single day.

Hospital admissions continued to increase. During the next six years another fifty thousand patients were treated. Mrs. Margaret Long of Allentown entered the institution on October 9, 1941 as Patient Number 150,000 and on the same day Mrs. Franklin Walck, also of Allentown, was admitted as Number 150,001. By that time, admissions had increased to 9,400 a year and 111,239 days of hospital care were being given at an average cost of $4.09 per patient. The average load per day was 306 patients and the peak 356, a drop of twenty-one from the high of 387 reached the previous year. Statistics reveal that a patient normally spent 10.83 days in the Hospital. Of the fifty thousand patients admitted between July 18, 1935 and October 9, 1941, 32,918 were adults who received surgical care, 9,382 adults who were given medical treatment, 8,596 cared for in the children’s wards, and 4,168 babies born in the Hospital. The official roster listed fifty-five physicians and surgeons on the Major Staff, seventy-seven on the Auxiliary Staff, and 371 full-time employes. Included were eighty-nine graduate nurses, thirty-three nurses in supervisory capacities, 144 student nurses, twelve dietitians and technicians, and eighty maintenance employes.

It took just five years to fill the next fifty thousand places on the register until Mrs. Ella Freed of Allentown was admitted on September 4, 1946 as Patient Number 200,000 and Mrs. Emma Wirth, coming into the Hospital for her ninetieth visit, as Number 200,001. Rearrangements within the Hospital, changes that converted some of the larger private rooms into facilities for semiprivate patients, and the addition of a third floor to the service building for the accommodation of more semi-private patients, had increased the rated capacity to four hundred beds, the average daily number of patients cared for during that fiscal year. Admissions in 1946 crossed the 10,000 mark for the first time, reaching 11,204, and the cost for the 135,350 days of hospital service rendered was $4.55 per day. In 1947 the Hospital admitted 13,687 patients; gave 152,057 days of care at an average cost of $5.70 per day; treated an average of 391 patients a day; and reached a peak load of 495. During the fiscal year ending May 31, 1948 in which the normal length of time spent in the Hospital was 9.76 days, 13,658 patients were admitted and cared for at a cost of $7.05 a day, a figure that generally reflected the sharp increases in living costs experienced by every family in America. The present trend of admissions3 indicates that the 250,000 mark will be reached during the Spring of 1950.

When the west wing and the service building were completed in 1928, Trustees believed they had provided facilities that would be adequate for at least twenty years. As early as 1937, however, the expanded institution was being hard-pressed and President Gernerd told the Hospital Association:

“The general public can little appreciate our responsibility and the constant effort and vigilance that must be exercised to render that service which this great human laboratory requires from day to day.

“A hospital is no longer a place to be feared. The amazing results that are achieved in restoring patients to health have inspired a confidence as well as an assurance of a superior care that has made the hospital the natural refuge for those afflicted by disease or maimed in body. While the Allentown Hospital is distinctly a local institution, yet the quality of service has been such that patients for miles around have come to us with their afflictions. There have been days during the past year that our bed capacity and facilities have been taxed to the extreme, but in the face of this situation, we are happy in the thought that our doors have never closed, nor has a patient been denied admittance during the thirty-eight years of our operation.”

The increased use of X-ray both for diagnostic purposes and for deep therapy involved in the treatment of cancer, the new developments in medicine and surgery that involved laboratory services, and the discoveries being made in the field of physiotherapy were taxing the capacity of the X-ray and laboratory building erected in 1921. New facilities for those departments and more adequate administrative quarters were listed by President Gernerd as pressing needs. They were even more pressing seven years later when, reporting to the Hospital Association in 1944, he said:

“Sixteen years have passed since we have enlarged our Hospital, and since then more than 100,000 patients have passed through our institution. Our daily average of patients in 1926 was 167. Thus far in 1944, our daily average has been 314, and last Sunday we had 338 patients. On the same day one year ago we had 295 patients.

“These astonishing figures reveal, as nothing else can, that our situation is really acute. The Board of Trustees have decided to enlarge the Hospital and have engaged a nationally known hospital engineer, in conjunction with one of our local architects, to plan the buildings that are so urgently compelling. These plans are being prepared as speedily as possible, so that when war hostilities have ceased and it is reasonable to proceed with building operations, no time shall be lost in relieving and improving our situation.”

He had indicated in 1941, and the Board agreed, that because of war emergencies the time was not propitious to launch a campaign for a construction program. Neither was it wise, because of mounting costs of building and maintenance, to encumber the institution with a large debt. Only one building project was undertaken before the war, the addition of a fourth floor to the Harvey Memorial to provide living accommodations for forty-five more student nurses. The new floor was completed at a cost of $56,212 — more than one-half of the cost of the original structure — and was occupied in May 1939. Other housing needs for nurses were met when the isolation section was moved to the old west wing in 1931 and the Reichenbach Memorial occupied as an auxiliary home for nurses; when the adjoining home of the late Reverend and Mrs. John Danner at 224 North Seventeenth Street was purchased in 1936 for $15,200 and converted into a residence for graduate nurses; and when a residence at 1550 Chew Street was acquired in May

1943 to supplement facilities for the student body of the School of Nursing, at abnormally high levels because of the increased tempo of war-time training.

“In view of the perilous conditions,” Mr. Gernerd said in 1941 as he related the Hospital’s needs for new buildings to the fact that the patient census on many days exceeded normal capacity, “the entire community must be made aware of our problem. Their patience and cooperation must be had, for only in a neighborly spirit can we continue in our philanthropic work of carrying on this Hospital.”

Dr. Charles F. Neergaard, New York consultant engaged in February 1944 to advise the Trustees in their study of the Hospital’s needs and to prepare preliminary plans for expansion, projected a building program to increase the capacity to a normal of five hundred beds, allowing for emergencies considerably beyond that number. Costs of the program he recommended, then were estimated at between $750,000 and $1,000,000. He proposed three major units: the extension of the west wing toward Chew Street to provide additional space for the Out-patient Department on the ground floor, for the treatment of urological patients on the first floor, for an isolation department on the second floor, for semiprivate and private patients on the third and fourth floors, and for obstetrical patients on the fifth floor; a new administration building, replacing the original structure, and providing workshops in the basement, offices and reception rooms on the first floor, Staff facilities on the second floor, accommodations for private and semiprivate patients on the third, fourth and fifth floors, and quarters for internes and resident physicians on the sixth floor; an extension of the service building to provide more diet kitchen space and a cafeteria in the basement, quarters for the X-ray and Physio-Therapy Departments on the first floor, and additional operating suites on the second floor.

With this program as its objective and on the basis of the costs as they then were estimated, the Hospital asked the community to contribute $550,000 in a campaign that was projected in June

1944 and conducted in December of that year. Mr. Gernerd defined the spirit of the campaign when he told members of the Hospital Association, meeting in June 1944:

“The Allentown Hospital is the community hospital. It has been conceived, developed, and built by the contributions of its citizens during the past forty odd years. To carry into effect the contemplated building requirements of the Hospital will entail an expenditure of approximately one million dollars.

It has been eighteen years since the citizens of Allentown have been called upon to contribute for a purpose of this character. There is but one source from which we can get this money and that is from our community. We can only secure it by a public campaign in which all citizens will be given an opportunity to contribute and to help. This money must be raised before we can build. I am confident that the thousands of patients who have been helped over the years are not only grateful for the care they have received, but that they are willing to contribute in order that these new facilities may be brought into being.”

His appraisal was accurate. Against an objective of $550,000, individuals and organizations in the community served by the Hospital contributed $686,959 to help meet its needs which they recognized to be their needs as well. Never in its history had the community responded so enthusiastically and wholeheartedly to the appeal of one of its institutions. Probably never before, except when the Hospital was established, had the cause been more urgent.

Realizing that because of the continuing demand for hospital service, space would have to be provided to compensate for the area that would be lost temporarily while new units were under construction, the Board directed that plans be made for adding a patient floor to the service building. Contracts for the addition that ultimately cost $64,190, were awarded in May 1945 and the section was completed the following March. It provides normal accommodations for twenty-two patients in eleven semi-private rooms. The unit, embodying new materials and construction methods that were being tested for use in the major building program, was designed by Ruhe and Lange and built by the E. C. Machin Company. Plans also were prepared for the proposed administration building and the west wing extension but because their erection meant the demolition of an existing building, construction permits were refused in 1946 by the Civilian Production Administration which still controlled the use of war-scarce building materials. Looking for other means to increase the number of beds, the Board authorized plans and specifications for adding a sixth floor to the west wing. Costs that were prohibitive, in comparison with the maximum gain that could be realized, forced cancellation of that project.

The need for additional laboratory and X-ray space could no longer be postponed. In September 1947, work was started on a small two-story unit adjoining the west wing in the court between that building and the service building. The first floor is given over entirely to the expanded X-ray Department and the basement houses modern extensions of the special diet kitchens. When the unit was occupied in October 1948, the pathology laboratories were given full use of the building that had been erected twenty-seven years earlier for the two departments. The addition, which added three thousand square feet of floor space to the Hospital’s service facilities, cost $54,641.

As the Hospital approached the end of its first half-century, it launched what ultimately may prove to be its most forward looking building project, the erection of a four-story addition at the north end of the west wing planned as a diagnostic clinic and health center. Ground for the newest structure was broken on July 21, 1948 and, although the building was not yet complete, it was dedicated as the Hospital marked its golden anniversary in May 1949. Until other projected buildings are completed, the ninety-two bed unit will accommodate the isolation section and the crippled children’s clinic on the ground floor, and ward and semiprivate patients on the three upper floors. As these patient facilities are moved into the new administration building and the front section of the west wing that will be built to connect with it, the released space will become a diagnostic clinic, a center into which a patient will be admitted for a complete health study and examination that will extend over several days. The building has been designated as the Harry Clay Trexler Memorial Health Center, recognizing the late General Trexler’s early interest in the Hospital and the continuing support given it by his estate. It was erected by the E. C. Machin Company at a cost of more than $360,000. Plans were prepared by Robert Lange and James Everett.

There are other evidences of both growth and service. Notable among them is the story of the Out-patient Department with twenty-four clinics, some of which are held daily and all of which are open at least one day a week. In a single month during 1949 the clinics registered 815 new patients, fifty-nine more than were recorded during the first two years following the opening of the department in 1918. Since 1921 the clinics have given 627,018 treatments to 126,626 registered patients, most of them persons unable to pay for the type of treatment they required and referred to the clinics either by state or public health nurses, by school authorities, or by their family physicians who recommended specialized attention. The department has opened new clinics as rapidly as the broad fields of medicine and surgery have developed new specialties and techniques. Today’s clinics include: dental, cardiac, chiropody, dermatology, diabetes, ear-nose-throat, eye, gastro-intestinal, gynecology, immunology, medical, neuro-psychiatric, orthopedic, pediatric, plastic surgery, pre and post natal, proctology, rheumatic heart, surgical, tumor, urology, venereal disease, and diagnostic. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, through its Department of Health, participates in supporting the chest, rheumatic heart, venereal disease, and diagnostic clinics. The Hospital Pharmacy has filled more than 45,000 prescriptions since the first professional pharmacist joined the staff in 1929.

The story of the Obstetrical Department may be cited as another outstanding example of development and growth. During the Hospital’s first quarter-century, 933 babies were born at the institution, the number ranging from one in 1901, to thirty-two in 1912 when the department was opened in the east wing, to eighty-three in 1919. During the next quarter-century, more than 20,000 were recorded.4 In 1947, the peak year, there were 2,332 births in the Hospital and in 1948 there were 2,056. Three floors of the west wing, with specially constructed nurseries on each of them, are being used in the care of obstetrical patients and considerably more space will be provided in the new buildings that are anticipated.

When the second quarter-century began, laboratories were making approximately 40,000 tests each year for hospitalized patients, a number that had increased sharply in 1915 when the development of techniques of blood typing and matching made possible the general use of transfusions. In the last quarter-century, the laboratories have made more than 2,500,000 tests, 158,285 of them during 1948. A blood bank, through which blood of every type is collected and stored to be available for transfusions without the delays occasioned by waiting for donors, was established in 1938 and a plasma bank was started in 1941. Together they have been responsible for saving the lives of hundreds of patients.

The X-ray Department, opened in 1907 when the Ladies Auxiliary purchased the first equipment for $985, has been steadily enlarged as new techniques and equipment have been developed. One piece of equipment alone, the photo-fluorographic X-ray purchased by the Lehigh County Tuberculosis and Health Society in

1948 and used for chest diagnosis, cost $9,698. The equipment, including that used in the deep therapy division that was opened in 1934, is valued at considerably more than $50,000. In 1917, the X-ray Department made three or four exposures a week and by 1919 was making five a day. Last year 22,762 exposures were made and 1,900 X-ray therapy treatments were given. Since the Department was opened forty-two years ago, it has taken more than

210,000 exposures that have made it possible for physicians and surgeons to arrive at more accurate and thorough diagnoses. Of the total, approximately 201,000 have been made in the last twenty-five years of the half-century.

The Physio-therapy Department, established during the second quarter-century, has given more than 165,000 treatments since 1928. Its report does not include the hundreds of visits each month by children who are treated under the supervision of physio-therapists of the Lehigh County Crippled Children’s Society in a warm water pool which that organization installed in 1937. The Society has provided other equipment used in the care of the crippled children it assists in treating and rehabilitating.

The Solutions Division, in which hundreds of liquid diets are prepared each month for intravenous feeding of patients, was opened in 1939. In the same year, the Hospital acquired through the American Legion Posts of Lehigh County, two iron lung respirators for the treatment of poliomyelitis patients.

During the war years, although its own staff of nurses, internes, physicians, and surgeons was sharply reduced by calls to military service, the Hospital organization continued to care for an increasing number of patients and found time to take an active part in Civilian Defense activities. It organized and equipped emergency field units ready to cope with major emergencies and made and purchased ninety cots that were kept available at centers that had been designated as field hospitals for use under emergency conditions. The Hospital itself practiced operating under blackout conditions so that its staff would be prepared to cope with any contingency. It assisted in the training of first aid workers and other Civilian Defense personnel, counted its sugar, meat, and canned goods ration points, and served as a distributing depot for both penicillin and streptomycin, when those new life-saving drugs were made available in limited quantities for civilian use. As new techniques for the treatment of patients, many of which were developed through the war years, were introduced into civilian practice, the Allentown Hospital was among the first to provide its Staff with the facilities necessary to adopt them.

Members of its Staff, with the approval and support of the Trustees, participated in public health movements. The institution made facilities available for the Maternal Health Center that had been established in Allentown and gave generous financial support to the organization of the Lehigh Valley Visiting Nurses Association.

As the end of the half-century approached, President Gernerd offered this proud and hope-filled summary:

“What a change has taken place. Fear and reluctance no longer exist. Its facilities are naturally sought. As our community grew, in like degree our physical requirements expanded. Through all these many years this institution has been fortunate in having the administrative guidance of many of our leading citizens who not only gave of their time, but largely of their means in providing the needs of our Hospital. Its development was a natural evolution. In this very institution we have an historical revelation of the extraordinary development of surgery, medicine, and hospitalization. What we possess today largely represents the humble endeavor of thousands of our citizens who, with unbounded zeal, labored in its service.

“Some of us will recall with gratitude many of the outstanding personalities of our city whose devotion to our Hospital is an inspiring example for us today. It was through their example and the loyalty of the medical profession that our Hospital grew in popular favor and won the hearts of our

people. The fact that our property and equipment represents approximately a value of $2,000,000 stands as a testimonial to their civic interest and neighborly spirit. How fortunate our community has been that as each of these friends made their earthly adieu, others followed in their footsteps and carried forward with the same high purpose the never-ending task that the administration of this institution imposes. Free of selfish desires, devoid of political influences or prejudices, it continues to serve all who seek its beneficent help. May the day never come when the traditional policy of this institution shall be diverted.”

AND THE GREATEST OF THESE IS CHARITY

EVEN the most casual scrutiny of the records of the Allentown Hospital reveals that it is primarily a philanthropy, an institution that through all of its history has demonstrated the highest degree of service and love for mankind as it, in turn, has received and merited the good will and the support of a major segment of the community it was created to serve.

True it is, that those who are able to pay for hospital care are expected and required to pay established rates in accordance with their means. It is just as true, however, that the individual unable to pay receives the same care and the same attention, from both the Hospital and its Staff, as the patient who occupies the most luxurious suite and who pays the highest rate. Only during the last six or seven years of the half-century did the number of patients who paid the full cost of their maintenance in the Hospital exceed those who were able to pay nothing.

Ledgers of the Hospital and of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania are in accord in presenting evidence that in the first forty-nine years of its history, it cost the Allentown Hospital $5,622,351 to provide free care for approximately forty-five per cent of the patients who were admitted during that period. They indicate, too, that only $2,473,897 of that amount — a scant forty-four per cent — has been met by taxation through the appropriations by the Pennsylvania Legislature, by Lehigh County, and by the City of Allentown. The remaining fifty-six per cent — $3,148,454 — was contributed substantially by those who believed in the Hospital, who had faith in its mission, and who were able and willing to share in its support so that it might serve both themselves and others. They were the same friends who, in gifts ranging from a single penny to $50,000, raised the $2,000,000 that was spent to build and equip the Hospital during its first fifty years and the $1,200,000 that is ready to be invested in new facilities that will make possible even

greater service during the second half-century. Normal operating income, through careful management, was husbanded to aid in the care of those unable to pay for their own hospitalization, and to meet the pressing needs for expansion in practically every decade of the Hospital’s existence.

Speaking to some of these friends when the Hospital dedicated the Harvey Memorial in 1915, but obviously directing his remarks to the community at large, Dr. J. Chalmer DaCosta5 said:

“The original function of a hospital was to treat the poor. That is still its highest duty, but in the United States, the care of the poor is not its sole usefulness. In the United States, the hospital is for the rich and the poor alike, for the millionaire and for the pauper, and admittance to a hospital no longer of necessity implies poverty. The poor man comes in without charge, and no one but the poor man should be permitted to. One who is better off enters the pay ward. One who is well to do takes a private room. Board from the private rooms is the most important element in furnishing money to run the hospital. Hence, every private room rented serves to pay the cost of keeping several poor persons in the ward without charge. To pay board in the hospital is charity, vicarious, perhaps unrecognized, but nevertheless a charity to others.

“A poor man is admitted to the ward without objections, obstacles, or degradation. He is unfortunate, but not a pauper. He cannot help being sick and poor, and to be a free patient in a hospital is no possible reflection on his manhood or dignity. One who can afford to pay ought not be admitted free. If he is admitted, he is at once deprived of manhood and dignity. His equivocation and pretenses to get into the dependent class pauperized him. He robs the hospital which cares for him. He steals the bed and board from some really poor man entitled to it. He cheats a decent medical man out of a fee to which he is entitled for attending him. Carelessness in this respect on the part of hospital officials means a costly and lamentable perversion of charity from the worthy to the undeserving. Such carelessness sows tares that may overwhelm the field.”

The number of patients cared for by the Hospital without charge during its first six months is not definitely stated. The record does show, however, that of the $4,298 charged to the maintenance of 168 patients for 2,789 days, the patients themselves paid $795.93, indicating that eighty-two per cent was free care.

“Our income from patients, especially from those in private rooms, has been considerable,” President Singmaster was able to report at the end of 1900, when Treasurer Reninger’s books showed that of the $7,486.26 spent to provide 6,465 days of care for 380 patients, the income from patients had been $2,812.38. The President noted, however, that he was “sorry to say that, in a few instances, patients who were amply able to pay, refused to give us anything even after being restored to perfect health. The same is true of several corporations whose employes have been cared for.”

In 1902, when 396 of the 533 patients admitted were unable to pay for their care and when thirty-three others paid only part of their bills, Judge Harvey observed, in his annual report:

“Hospitals without large endowments cannot be maintained without receiving some pay patients, unless the people voluntarily give enough for maintenance. It must not be understood that the assigning of rooms and the acceptance of per diem pay in any way interferes with those patients who are unable to pay anything. Our first thought is for those who are unfortunate and have no means with which to pay for treatment. They are never excluded in preference to the more fortunate; the latter always will be refused if, by accepting them, the poor and the needy could not be treated.”

Again in 1907, when better than sixty-five per cent of the 995 patients admitted were cared for without charge, he said:

“It has been and will continue to be, under the present management, the policy to give all advantages to those afflicted and needing treatment who are poor and have not the means to pay for professional and scientific care. They are the wards of the public. Justice, not charity alone, demands that the community shall care for such. Pay patients are admitted. They require the same professional care as others. What they pay is used in the maintenance of the institution. It amounts usually to a large sum. But their admission is subordinate to the immediate needs of the afflicted poor.”

That the policy was firm through the years is indicated by the fact that of the more than $12,000,000 the Hospital spent on maintenance during the first forty-nine years of its history, $5,622,351, a strong forty-five per cent, went for the care of patients unable to pay. Although prepaid hospital care, through the Hospital Service Plan of the Lehigh Valley and other insurance programs, has sharply reduced the number of patients receiving free care, increasing operating expenses have kept the total cost high. In 1937, when sixty-one per cent of the patients admitted were unable to pay, the cost of their care was $240,000. In 1947, the number of free patients was reduced to twenty-four per cent of the total admissions but, with hospital care averaging $5.70 per day, the cost was still $206,000. In 1948, when only fifteen per cent of those admitted were unable to pay for their maintenance, the Hospital spent $241,905, an average of $7.05 per day, for their board, nursing, X-ray examinations, laboratory tests, and medications. Indications, based on figures for the first six months of the

1949 fiscal year, when eighteen per cent of the patients admitted were classified as free, are that these demands again are ascending.

The burden of providing free hospital care for those unable to pay has been met only in part by appropriations from taxing bodies. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, which has contributed to the operating budget of the Hospital since 1899, through maintenance appropriations of $1,739,3976, has paid thirty-two per cent of the cost of the free care. During the early years of the Hospital, the State also contributed $10,500 for necessary plant expansion. Pennsylvania’s contributions ranged from $2,500 for 1898 and 1899, to $93,750 during 1948. Lehigh County, through action of the County Commissioners, made its first contribution to the Hospital’s maintenance fund in 1917 when, at the request of the late James Schaadt, it appropriated $10,000. Since then, in twenty-six grants that have ranged from $6,000 to $48,000, the County has contributed $713,500, a fraction more than twelve per cent of the cost of the free care rendered. County allocations, from 1945 through 1948, were $35,000 a year. The City of Allentown, which made its first contribution in 1935, has given $15,500, less than half of one per cent of the cost of the free care rendered by the Hospital. Its average contribution was $1,107 a year; its last four allocations were $1,000 each. Even in 1948, when the combined allocations from the three taxing bodies were the highest and when the demands for free care were the lowest in the history of the Hospital, they contributed only fifty-three per cent of the cost of that care.

Speaking of state support for hospitals when he participated in the dedication of the Harvey Memorial in 1915, former President William Howard Taft said:

“The most important question in respect to a hospital is the cost of maintenance. The original donation of land and building is necessary to its birth, but the maintenance of an up-to-date hospital is the heartbreaking fact that qualifies the enthusiasm of the promoters of the philanthropy. The cost of maintenance of the Allentown Hospital will be about $62,000 a year. Of this, the state pays $17,500, as well it may, because seventy-three per cent of all patients treated are free patients.

Thirty-one thousand dollars are realized from pay patients, for under a wise Pennsylvania statute, everybody who can pay must pay. Thirteen thousand, five hundred dollars are raised by the activities of the people of Allentown. In these days of paternalism, government ownership, and thinly-veiled state socialism, it is a genuine pleasure to come upon an institution like this Allentown Hospital, founded and operated under the most approved principles. So carefully is it run, that the cost of maintenance per patient is $1.27 a day, the lowest rate shown by an institution of the same general character in the state. This could never have been achieved under full state support and management. Inevitably, when the state pays all, it pays more. The best system of state charity is that which rests on private foundations, and is conducted under private management, but receives from the state a compensatory support for the public work done. The state must have full supervisory power to see that its work is well done, but that is not all. The struggles of the trustees and promoters in raising money, the free service of noble men and women in the management, the necessary economies that each year imposes, lead to an efficiency and a loving promotion of the charity that are rarely found in a state-supported and managed institution. Politics are thus rigidly excluded.”

Bridging the gap between income from patients able to pay and the actual cost of providing care for all who were admitted to the Hospital was a challenge in every month of each of these fifty years of its operation. It remains an almost perilous problem as the institution enters its second half-century during an era of unprecedented costs. That it was solved repeatedly, is indicated by the fact that the Hospital not only remained solvent, but, also, during the fifty years expanded from a thirty-bed institution to one of more than four hundred beds. At the same time, the indebtedness that it occasionally was compelled to incur was liquidated and a building fund of more than $1,200,000 was accumulated to begin the second half-century. The accomplishments are a tribute both to the ultimate generosity and loyalty of the community and to the careful management of the Trustees and those entrusted with the day-by-day business operations.

In the early years of the institution, support came principally from individual contributions, the pennies and nickels of children attending the public schools, the nickels and dimes dropped in collection plates when churches and Sunday schools made special appeals, the annual dues paid by members of the Hospital Association, and the larger contributions from many of those whose means made it possible for them to carry a major share of the responsibility. Hospital ledgers are filled with the names of those who made it possible for the institution to carry on its work. Dozens of pages in the printed reports for the early years list hundreds of others whose recorded gifts include: a jar of cherries; six cups of jelly; two gallons of whiskey and two gallons of brandy; home-made soup and old muslin; canned fruit and men’s socks; soup, beans, and rice; one barrel each of apples, potatoes, and turnips; two bars of soap; cabbage, soap, corn, peas, rice, cornstarch, salt, and cocoa; eight pounds of oatmeal; one gallon applebutter; old muslin; a basket of peaches; bound volumes of the United States Census. Indeed, when the number of patients was low, it appears altogether possible that the Hospital had little to buy in the way of provisions, other than fresh meats, dairy products, and perhaps a few fresh vegetables.

Among the cash contributions of $2,847 listed by Treasurer Reninger for 1900, the first full year of operations, are $355.98 from a dozen churches and $407.32 from the first donation day in the public schools of the city. The Hospital counted heavily upon these gifts during its first quarter-century. Voluntary contributions made in response to appeals at Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year, and other festival occasions approached $30,000 a year, in addition to thousands of dollars worth of provisions. The solicitations were abandoned in 1930, when the Hospital joined other agencies in a single annual appeal through the Community Chest.

In his report to the Hospital Association in 1900, President Singmaster said:

“This Hospital enjoys the unique and proud distinction of never having borrowed a dollar either for building or maintenance. This is not said in the spirit of idle boasting, but in recognition of the providence and blessing of Almighty God, who gave his Son to be our Great Physician, and who, we humbly believe, looks with approval upon the beneficent enterprise in which we are engaged.

“Our resources are largely the generosity of the public, whose liberality we have always sought to deserve. The chief sources of income are the annual dues of the members, collections in schools and churches, fees from patients who are able to pay, contributions from corporations, firms, societies, individuals, and the Ladies Auxiliary, and appropriations from the state.

“These resources will be ample if properly developed. The day preceding Thanksgiving has been designated as donation day in the public schools. We are gratified to be able to

report that the proceeds this year amounted to over $400 in cash, together with a fair supply of provisions.”

Confidence in the community’s willingness to support the Hospital also was expressed by Judge Harvey in his report to the Association in 1902:

“When you remember that the per diem cost for maintenance is $1.0775 per patient, it will be clear that we must have sure sources of revenue to meet the expenses. Some we get annually from the Commonwealth; but it is not enough. Some we get from annual dues; but it is not enough. Some we get from gifts and donations; but these are not enough. We must, and we do, rely on a liberal public who have given unstintingly. Without their generous benefactions — without the one munificent donation7 — this institution could not have been built and furnished. It was built because it was a necessity; it will be supported, generously and liberally, because it is now more than ever a necessity.”

Public appeals for funds, including the Tag Days that were held annually for twenty-one years by the Ladies Auxiliary and the Junior Auxiliary, were abandoned in 1930, when the Hospital joined other welfare groups in organizing the Allentown Community Chest, now the Lehigh County Community Chest. From 1931 through 1948 the Hospital received $457,451.85, an average of $25,413 a year from the funds collected through the Community Chest organization. It has remained an active Red Feather Agency and has given full support to the Community Chest, in spite of the fact that only in one year did its income from the united campaign exceed the approximately $30,000 a year it received through its individual appeals in the years just prior to the establishment of the Chest. Income from Community Chest funds ranged from $13,333 in 1931 to $36,172 in 1933. Since 1945 the annual allocations have been less than $25,000 each, averaging $22,626 a year from 1945 through 1948.

The endowment fund has been another source of support and a major help in balancing maintenance budgets. Invested in real estate, first mortgages, and Class A securities are gifts and legacies that have been contributed to provide an annual income for perpetuating the Hospital’s service to those unable to pay for their own care. The fund was started in 1901 with a gift of $1,000 from the late John Lentz, first Treasurer of the Hospital Association. As the Hospital began its fiftieth year on June 1, 1948, the invested


funds totalled $367,078 and in the preceding year returned an income of $10,184 at the rate of 2.7 per cent. Gifts to the fund, perpetuating the memory of the donors, have ranged from $11.99 to $56,022.47.

A separate endowment, the income of which also comes to the Hospital annually, is the G. B. F. Deily Hospital Fund, established in 1940 through the will of the late George B. F. Deily, Catasauqua merchant and financier, who during his lifetime, was one of the devoted friends of the institution and a regular contributor to its work. In addition, Mr. Deily’s will established a $100,000 trust fund for his sister, Mrs. Peter J. Laubach, with the provision that after her death the Hospital was to receive one-third of the income from it. The residuary estate was established as another trust, with one-fourth of the income going to the Hospital. One-half interest in the family homestead in Catasauqua also is to be added to the Hospital endowment fund.

One of the most important sources of private income for the Hospital is an annual share in the income from the Estate of the late General Harry C. Trexler and his wife, Mary Trexler, both of whom were among the Hospital’s earliest friends. Since the Trustees of the Estate made the first payments to the Hospital in 1935, under the terms of the will, the institution has received $481,850, used principally to liquidate indebtedness on buildings and to provide funds for the new construction necessary to meet the increasing demands for hospitalization. The gifts ranged from $10,000 in 1935 to $52,000 in 1937 and averaged $34,416 a year. From 1946 through 1948, a period as notable for diminishing returns on invested funds as for increasing living costs, the gifts were $25,000 a year. The Trexler Estate also contributed generously to the Hospital’s Building Fund campaign in 1944, and annual contributions from the Estate to the Community Chest are responsible, in part, for the institution’s annual receipts from that source. To provide for these charitable bequests, General Trexler directed in his will that one-half of his Estate, after the payment of several relatively small specific legacies, be established as a trust, the income of which is allocated to religious, welfare, and charitable agencies in the community at the discretion of the Trustees of the Estate.

The number of patients admitted to the Hospital for free service declined sharply in the year following the organization of the Hospital Service Plan of the Lehigh Valley in 1938, and the Allentown Hospital’s active association with it in February 1939.

Three members of the Hospital’s Board of Trustees, J. B. Bronstein, Reuben J. Butz, and Judge Claude T. Reno, joined representatives of other area communities in developing the plan for pre-paid hospitalization shortly after such a system had been instituted in Easton. Associated in the organization are the Allentown Hospital, the Sacred Heart Hospital of Allentown, St. Luke’s Hospital of Bethlehem, the Easton Hospital and the Betts Hospital of Easton, the Palmerton Hospital, the Haff Hospital of Northampton, and the Warren County Hospital of Phillipsburg, N. J. Through modest monthly payments, subscribers to the plan assure themselves of from twenty-one days to thirty days of complete hospital care, depending upon their length of membership, for each different ailment during a contract year. Payments by the Blue Cross organization during 1948 averaged $9.01 per day for each of the 3,752 patients admitted to the Hospital under the plan. The Hospital received $274,340.39 from the organization during 1948 and smaller amounts from other prepaid hospitalization plans. From 1940, when 196 patients in the Allentown Hospital received Blue Cross benefits, through 1948, the Hospital provided care for 13,334 patients whose bills, exclusive of professional charges by physicians, surgeons, or private duty nurses, were substantially met by the Hospital Service Plan of the Lehigh Valley.

To gain a true picture of hospital costs, per diem averages which increased from $1.15 in 1899 to $7.05 in 1948 must be balanced against sharp decreases in the period of hospitalization for the average patient, the improved chances of complete recovery, advances in income levels, and general increases in all living costs. In 1908, when the average patient spent 28.8 days in the Allentown Hospital, the cost of care was $1.28 per day or $36.86 for the period of treatment. Forty years later, when the cost of care had increased to $7.05 per day and the average period of hospitalization had been reduced to 9.76 days, the cost per patient was $68.80, an increase of 86.6 per cent. During the same period, the average income for wage earners in the community increased from $440 per year to approximately $2,100, a gain of 377.2 per cent. The average private patient who in 1908 paid $3 per day for hospital care, gave the institution a margin that provided 38.7 days of free care for a patient unable to pay. The private patient in 1948, paying an average of $8.50 per day, provided a margin during his average stay that paid for only 1.4 days of free care.

That the Allentown Hospital belongs to the community is clearly indicated by the fact that all but $10,500 of the $2,000,000 spent to build and to equip it during the first fifty years and the $1,200,000 that is ready for the expansion projected for the early part of the second half-century, has come from private sources, individuals and organizations in the community the Hospital exists to serve. Several units of the plant, many specific rooms and wards, and some major pieces of equipment are permanent memorials to the generous donors who provided the funds that made them possible. Each brick and stone, each bed and chair, each inch of ground is, however, a monument, separately and collectively, to the thousands whose gifts and whose interest created the Hospital as an instrument for service to every segment of the community.

Speaking of the gifts that made the early building possible, and his remarks are just as appropriate today, Judge Harvey said:

“Some gave as memorials to departed friends and relatives; others as contributions to the work in which they have a profound interest. What nobler end could be desired than to aid in the relief of human suffering! Sepulchral monuments and costly ornaments erected to departed friends attract the eye but are not gratifying to the living and serve no purpose for the dead. In a few generations the dead are forgotten and the elaborate tombs have no significance; they are as ineffable as ruins. But where the monument is active, constant, and is silently but surely ministering to our fellowmen, the purpose keeps alive the memorial; the dead are not forgotten; the donor will be remembered as long as the charity is extant.

“The citizens of Allentown are known for their interest in the welfare of the community. What city of its size can boast of so many splendid churches? What city of its size contributes annually so much for the poor? What city has given as quickly and as much for a hospital? Each gives according to his or her means and gives ungrudgingly — each is a cheerful giver.”

In all of the Hospital’s history there have been only three community-wide campaigns for funds to support it. One of them, in the fall and early winter of 1919, was for debt liquidation. The other two, in 1926 and in 1944, raised funds for plant expansion.

Of the $36,092 contributed to build and equip the original unit and to maintain it for the first six months, the Ladies Auxiliary takes credit for raising almost $15,000. Approximately $12,000 came from 108 individuals and business concerns whose gifts ranged from $1.50 to $2,000. Others contributed through church and Sunday school offerings that raised $1,153, through lodges and societies whose members gave $321, through the nickels and dimes and pennies they dropped into “tin hospital boxes” that were strategically placed through the city, and through the Morning Call

Fund. The money for the west wing and its annex was contributed by Mr. and Mrs. James K. Mosser. The buildings were furnished by the Auxiliary and by other friends of the Hospital, both individuals and groups. It was not until 1905, after the boiler house and laundry were built at a cost of more than $15,000, that the institution reported its first debt, $9,674.66. The debt was liquidated by the end of 1910, in spite of the fact that the plot on which the nurses’ home now stands had been purchased for $4,500.

When the need for the east wing became evident, the Hospital management again turned to private solicitation and as construction got under way had assurances of $70,000. As the building neared completion late in 1911, Judge Harvey reported that during the first twelve years of its service to the community, the Hospital had spent a quarter million dollars on buildings and grounds and $281,484 for maintenance. Beyond the amounts due for construction, the institution had no debt. In 1912, after the east wing was completed and furnished, the indebtedness was $93,786, including a maintenance deficit of $15,000. Through the efforts of Dr. C. D. Schaeffer and the late Mayor A. L. Reichenbach, $33,600 of that amount was raised in little more than two weeks in 1914, making it feasible to award the contract for the construction of the Harvey Memorial in October of that year. Mayor Reichenbach, who long had advocated the erection of a nurses’ home, was instrumental in making its construction possible with funds from the Harvey Estate.

Although Judge Harvey’s Estate provided funds that would have been more than sufficient for the completion of the building that bears his name, under the provisions of his will only $50,000 could be spent for building purposes. The remaining $56,000 was specified for the endowment fund. Building of the nurses’ home, the purchase of the Ziegler property at the southwest corner of Seventeenth and Chew Streets, and the increasing maintenance deficits added substantially to the institution’s interest-bearing obligations and prompted its first county-wide campaign. The solicitation for $165,000 was conducted in the fall of 1919, under the leadership of Mayor Reichenbach. Before his death on March 13, 1920, $124,995 had been raised, sufficient to liquidate all of the indebtedness except a $30,000 mortgage on the Ziegler property. There were 7,042 contributors whose gifts ranged from one penny to $3,000. A few days after Mr. Reichenbach’s death, a group of his friends initiated a campaign to raise sufficient funds to clear the mortgage on the Ziegler property, designated as the Reichenbach Memorial Home.

A major campaign with an objective of $400,000 was planned for the Spring of 1923. It was postponed, however, because of the serious illness of Dr. Schaeffer. In 1924, when President Hunsicker reported that the institution again was free of debt, he urged the Hospital Association to seek funds for urgently needed additions. That campaign was undertaken in November 1926 under the leadership of David A. Miller. Against a goal of $600,000, pledges from 4,297 individuals and organizations totalled $639,727. All but $25,000 of the amount subscribed was collected. Two gifts of $50,000 each, one from W. E. Erdell and the other from the Junior Auxiliary of the Hospital, were included in the $235,000 subscribed in advance of the general solicitation by Trustees, members of the Staff, and others closely associated with the work of the institution. The funds raised, however, were not sufficient to pay for the extensive building program that included the erection of the service building and the west wing at a cost of $828,141. The debt incurred to complete the work reached a peak of $307,000 while pledges still were being paid. The entire indebtedness was liquidated in August 1942, without recourse to another campaign.

As early as 1937, President Gernerd pointed to the need for additional facilities, and urged that immediate steps be taken to acquire funds. The constant task of the Hospital during the years just passed, he emphasized, had been to search for money needed to provide the mounting costs of maintenance imposed by the volume of free care given during the depression years.

“I believe,” he said, “that an informed public, thoroughly conversant with our situation and the tremendous work and good that is being done daily, will find a way to assist us with fulfilling the very high purposes for which our institution lives. When we contemplate and realize the millions that are being expended yearly for material development to take care of the public’s convenience, pleasure, and comfort, then truly the money required to supply the pressing needs of our Hospital is but a small amount for the public to provide. I feel confident that the thousands of patients who have returned to their homes, restored in health, and their innumerable friends, as well as the charitable impulse of the community, will help us in bringing about this realization. We have met many difficult situations before. We have met them and succeeded. I have faith that we shall succeed again.”

The campaign he projected was delayed, principally because of war-time conditions, until the fall of 1944 when it was conducted under the leadership of Frank M. Cressman as general chairman.

Against a goal of $550,000, the community subscribed $680,373. There were 3,221 contributors whose gifts ranged from fifty cents to two of $50,000 each, the one from the Junior Auxiliary and the other from Dr. Robert L. Schaeffer. Records of the campaign, most successful ever undertaken by any Allentown organization, reveal that sixty-five gifts were from fifty cents to one dollar; 665 between $10 and $20; eighty-seven between $1,000 and $10,000; and fourteen from $10,000 to $50,000. Receipts from the campaign, together with income from the Trexler Estate and from several other sources, were earmarked specifically for building purposes and invested in government bonds. Using a part of these resources, the Hospital built the third floor of the service building to provide additional accommodations for patients, erected the laboratory and kitchen annex, and constructed the four-story addition to the west wing. The balance, approximately $1,200,000, will be used toward the erection of the new administration and patient building, the completion of the west wing, and the addition of four wings to the nurses’ home.

The task, during the past fifty years, has been a major one and the accomplishment has been notable. Constantly increasing demands for the facilities that only a well-equipped hospital can offer are a definite indication that the challenge will be a continuing one. There seems to be adequate proof from the performance of the past that the record of the future can at least be equally proud.

A TASK AND A TRUST

IF the mark of an institution is the measure of the men who determine and direct its policies, then the stature achieved by the Allentown Hospital during its first half-century is understandable.

Through the years, the call to the Board of Trustees of the Allentown Hospital Association has been answered by outstanding leaders in the life of the community who deemed it an honor to serve, but who did not regard their positions as honorary or empty titles, mere badges of affluence or esteem. To them, membership on the Board has been a challenge, an opportunity to serve in a humanitarian field that transcends all prejudices, that recognizes the right of all individuals to happiness through sound health, that knows no barriers of race, color, or creed, of political affiliation, social position, or economic status.

They are the men who, among themselves and from others they have influenced, raised the funds for the buildings that today house the Allentown Hospital and that in the months and years ahead will make possible even more and wider services, the services that constantly are being developed by those who devote their lives to the study of the human body and its care. They are those who, regardless of self and through great personal sacrifice of time, energy, and resources, have balanced maintenance budgets, husbanded resources, wisely administered income, and who with vision, courage, and daring have charted the path of progress. They have selected staffs and provided the equipment for physicians, surgeons, and technicians to use in the care of the sick and the injured. They have recruited nurses and established the facilities to train them. They have determined and administered the broad policies within which those whom they have called to service have battled disease, eased pain, and restored bodies; but they never have sought to dictate or to mandate in the professional fields beyond their own skills or training. In discharging what to them has been a public trust, they have built a monument, not to themselves, but to man’s thoughtfulness for the needs of his fellow men.

The Board of Trustees, according to the constitution of the Allentown Hospital Association, consists of fifteen persons, five of them elected by the Association at each of its annual meetings to serve for three-year terms. It represents and has the full power to act for the corporation in the exercise of its rights and privileges, except that it may not sell or dispose of real estate without the consent of a majority of members present at a meeting of the Corporation. Stated meetings of the Board are held each month, and there are frequent special meetings as the need arises. At each regular meeting the Trustees receive full reports from the Hospital Staff through the Chief of Staff, from the Superintendent, from the Director of Nursing, from their Treasurer who also is the Treasurer of the Hospital, and from their own standing committees. It has been characteristic for officers of the Board and for members of its standing committees to maintain close personal contact with the operations and procedures charged directly to them. Standing committees actively supervise all the administrative functions of the Hospital through the Superintendent and the Director of Nursing; direct financial affairs including the collection of funds, the investment of endowment, and the control of the budget, itself an item that in the various stages of preparation engages the attention of the entire Board; provide for the maintenance of buildings and plan their erection and improvement; select physicians and surgeons for the Staff and pass upon the qualifications of those who seek staff privileges; and oversee, through the Director of Nursing, the instruction and discipline of nurses and student nurses.

All Board members serve without remuneration and receive no special privileges. Records of the Hospital reveal that they have been and still are among the most substantial contributors to its building programs, its maintenance funds, and its endowment. It has not been unusual, through the fifty years, for a Trustee to designate the Hospital as one of the principal beneficiaries of his estate and, by example, to stimulate similar gifts from others.

It should be clear, too, that the Trustees are not stockholders or shareholders, for there are neither stocks nor shares in the Allentown Hospital Association. The Trustees are today and in years past have been men from every walk of community life, members of the Association through the payment of dues. They have been called upon to aid in administering a public trust because of some outstanding talent or because of a particular service or function they were eminently qualified to contribute. Few to whom the call has been extended have declined the responsibility and many have continued to serve the Hospital long after relinquishing all other associations, even after retiring from their own vocations or professions.

Among the sixty-six men who have been members of the Board since the Allentown Hospital Association was chartered in January 1896, there have been doctors and lawyers, school teachers and clergymen, merchants and manufacturers, a few public officials, bankers, and builders. Although some have had tenure for twenty-five years or longer, the average term of service on the Board has been 11.6 years. Nine have been members of the Board for twenty-five or more years; fifteen have served beyond twenty years; twenty-four have exceeded fifteen years of service; and thirty-five have been members for ten years or more.

Honors for length of service during the first half-century go to the late James F. Hunsicker, the third President of the Board, who completed ten terms of three years each and had begun his eleventh before his death in 1926. The late Emil A. Hirner, with a record of twenty-nine years, and Attorney Reuben J. Butz, who completes twenty-nine years during the fiftieth anniversary observance to head the list of those now serving on the Board, are close seconds. The late Colonel Edward M. Young with twenty-seven years of service, David A. Miller with twenty-six years, William N. Eberhard, the late Dr. Charles D. Schaeffer, and the late E. N. Kroninger, each with twenty-five years of service, are the other quarter-century veterans.

The founding fathers — those who served on committees and boards prior to the incorporation of the Allentown Hospital Association — are another group, public spirited men and women who had the vision and the courage to lay the foundations that made possible the establishment of the first hospital to open its doors to serve the community. Among those who served in the initial movements and became members of the first Board of Trustees of the incorporated hospital were; H. W. Allison, Dr. Orlando Fegley, who became the first Chief Surgeon, James F. Gallagher, John R. Gossler, Dr. W. H. Hartzell, the first Chief Physician, Judge Edward Harvey, Henry Leh, John E. Lentz, the Reverend John B. Maus, the Reverend George W. Richards, Hiram S. Shimer, the Reverend J. A. Singmaster, and General Harry C. Trexler.

Board presidents have been particularly faithful through long years of service. During the first fifty years only five men have held that office. The Reverend J. A. Singmaster, who was named President of the first Board in January 1896, as soon as the charter had been granted, served until January 1901. He resigned after being called from the pastorate of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Allentown to a professorship in the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, of which he later became President. During his administration the site for the Hospital was selected, the first building was erected, the Hospital received its first appropriation from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the first ladies auxiliary was organized, community appeals were instituted for needed support, the training school for nurses was established, and the Hospital was securely and firmly launched on its long career of service. Before he resigned, the Hospital was caring for a maximum of twenty-seven patients at one time, and the first addition, the west wing, was planned.

Writing prophetically, he made these observations in his last report as President.

“The Hospital has successfully passed its experimental stage. Its right to live has been vindicated. It has converted doubters into friends. No well-informed, unprejudiced citizen would want the Hospital to fail. The policy of conservative management, united with a view to the future, has given it not only present efficiency but also provided for expansion as the need may arise. The continuance of this policy must insure stability and a high degree of usefulness to the community. Only recently a committee was appointed by the Board to take into consideration the feasibility of erecting a wing early in spring.

“This institution ought ever to be the pride of this prosperous city. Standing upon the threshold of what promises to be the grandest century in the history of mankind—a century that will be distinguished for great progress in the science and the art of healing, as well as for the growth of humane feeling — we will not allow ourselves to fear that this community will be so unworthy of its blessings as to permit so noble an institution to languish. It would be sad, indeed, should the pursuit of gain or pleasure benumb the higher feelings of our men and women of means to such an extent as to cause them to ignore the just claims of the indigent sick and maimed.

“The destiny of this Hospital is largely in the hands of the Board of Trustees whom this Association elects. I would, therefore, pray this honorable body, in this my last official word, never to allow personal friendship, political partisanship, or sectarian zeal to influence the choice of trustees. Elect citizens who have no private ends to serve, but who, moved by humane impulses, will freely give of their time and money to foster the Hospital.

“I would also deprecate municipal or state control, for my observation leads me to the conclusion that an institution like ours fares best under private management.”

Judge Edward Harvey, who became President in 1902, saw the Hospital expand until it admitted more than 1,500 patients in a year and cared for a maximum of 110 at one time. It was under his administration, continuing until his death in 1913, that the west wing was completed, the east wing erected, and the first unit of the boiler house and the laundry built. His was the leadership that was responsible for purchasing the site for the nurses’ home that today bears his name, for opening the Out-patient Department, for establishing the endowment fund, for opening the first obstetrical ward and the first ward specifically designed for the care of children, and for the installation of the X-ray equipment requested by the Staff.

His service to the Hospital is best expressed by his associates, the men who served with him on the Board, in the resolutions noting his death on September 7, 1913:

“Resolved that in the death of Honorable Edward Harvey, the Hospital loses a loyal friend and supporter, who proved his genuine interest in its purposes no less by eleven years of continuous service as President of the Board of Trustees than by the generous bequest contained in his last will.

“A brilliant lawyer, he gave the benefit of the invaluable business experience, acquired in the long practice of his profession, to the administration of the business affairs of the Hospital, which increased tenfold during his term as President, with similar increase in the work, the responsibilities, and the usefulness of the institution. He, early in his term, recognized the necessity of providing for the nurses, those gentle, self-sacrificing souls, so swift to answer the calls of suffering, a Home, separated from their daily work, in which to find rest and recreation; and for convalescing patients, a Solarium in which, under the strengthening rays of the sun, they might slowly woo back health and vigor. In every annual report, at every commencement, he appealed with silver tongue to our philanthropic citizens, already so generous to the Hospital, to increase their benefactions and contributions so as to make it possible for the Board to construct and equip a nurses’ home and a solarium. Of those who heard him, some sneered at the eloquent appeals, and covertly inquired why he himself did not, out of the ample means with which Providence had blessed him, build the home and the solarium. Now that he is forever silent, these carping critics are struck dumb by the magnificence of the bequest bestowed on the Hospital by his last will, which assures the erection of the nurses’ home, for which he so often pleaded. During his term, he assisted in the dedication of the Mosser Wing, the contribution of a charitable individual citizen to our community, and before his death saw the unequaled eastern wing of the Hospital completed and in operation. He was the first of ten generous citizens who each gave five thousand dollars toward the cost of construction of the eastern wing. Nor did this measure his benefactions to the noble purposes of the Hospital. From year to year he contributed to the needs of the Hospital; and realizing that after the first cost of building and equipment, the greatest need of a hospital is funds for annual maintenance of patients, three-fourths of whom are treated and maintained without expense to themselves, Judge Harvey by his will directed that one-third of his large residuary estate shall be placed in the endowment fund, and the income forever devoted to the expense of maintenance; a wise and generous provision, which will bring comfort and healing to thousands of unfortunates in the years to come; an individual contribution to a semi-public charity until this time unequaled by that of any individual citizen of our community. While still so near to him, who has just gone before us, that it is difficult to express a just estimate of his life, and work, and influence, let us remember to be charitable in our criticisms of our weak fellow creatures and their actions. We miss Judge Harvey in our meetings and our deliberations; he is gone from us, but his works do live after him.”

There were many improvements during the twelve-year term of James F. Hunsicker, President of the Board from 1914 until he resigned that office in January 1926, just a few months before his death. Chief among them were the changes in policy that opened the Hospital, within certain limitations, to all qualified members of the medical profession; the building and the dedication of the nurses’ home; the purchase of the property at the southwest corner of Seventeenth and Chew Streets, including the residence that as the Reichenbach Memorial became the first contagious disease unit; and the purchase of the first motorized ambulance. Before he retired as President, the Hospital was admitting more than 3,500 patients in a year and was caring for an average of 157 a day. It also had reached a peak census of 204 patients during a single day.

“During his incumbency,” the Board noted in regretfully accepting his resignation as its president, “our Hospital grew greatly in usefulness. It was while he was at the helm that we so modified our policy as to win recognition from our community as its General Hospital. His wise counsel, his fairness and broadmindedness were the governor which helped us safely through the reconstruction which terminated in the open Hospital which we are now administering.”

Upon his death, this minute was entered upon the records of the Hospital:

“During these thirty-one years he labored cheerfully and unselfishly giving much of his time to the interests of the Hospital and aided with hands, heart, and purse in its upbuilding.

“Few men give themselves in the service of others so willingly and gracefully as did he.

“As President of the Board for twelve years he used that excellent business judgment which pervaded his busy life and helped much in giving the institution its strong financial position.

“His intimate touch with every department of the Hospital gave him a very valuable asset in the conduct of its affairs.

“His intense sympathy for patient, doctor, nurse, and helper endeared him to them all.”

The greatest growth was recorded during the next twenty-two years, the period from 1926 to 1948 that covered the administration of Attorney Fred B. Gernerd. During his term of office, nearly

175,000 patients were admitted to the Hospital, 13,687 of them in 1947 for a total of 152,057 days of hospital care in that year. The Hospital’s facilities were increased to such an extent that it was able to care for an average of 400 patients a day in 1946. It reached a record daily census, by straining every resource, of 495 patients during the winter of 1945. There were two major financial campaigns during his administration, one to which $635,000 was subscribed and the other which raised $680,373. He was President of the Board when the service building was erected and enlarged, when the west wing was built and its addition planned for ultimate use as a diagnostic clinic-health center, and when the nurses’ home was expanded by the addition of the fifth floor. During his term, two properties were purchased to provide additional housing for graduate staff nurses and the Board launched plans for modernization and enlargement that will provide comfortable accommodations for 525 patients and emergency facilities far beyond that number. Community Chest affiliation and the establishment of the Lehigh Valley Hospital Plan were among the other accomplishments of the years covered by his tenure. Mr. Gernerd, who insisted upon close personal contact with every activity of the Hospital, made it a practice to make a personal inspection at least

once each week and to visit patients to learn their reactions and suggestions.

In his report to the Hospital Association in June of 1948, written during what he recognized as his last illness, Mr. Gernerd offered this as his valedictory:

“Within another year, we shall have administered to the sick for a period of fifty years. As the community grew, so did the Hospital. Thousands of patients have crossed our threshold and the fine spirit that prevails with us has existed ever since this institution was founded. No finer group of citizens ever undertook the building of so great a charity as did those who were responsible for our Hospital. Each and every one of the founders believed in the precepts of Jesus and in that spirit we have grown and prospered.

“I have found my associations in this institution for twenty-four years my greatest pleasure in life, in fact, it has been a part of my life, and I regret that my physical disability has prevented me from making my weekly visits through the institution. I am certain that every Trustee who served in the past, as well as those who are now serving, have found this work and responsibility real compensation because we have rendered a service without any reward except the knowledge that we have performed our part in a great cause to aid suffering humanity.

“When we review the history of the Allentown Hospital and recall the many fine men and women who weekly gave of themselves in the maintenance of the Hospital, little wonder that we have such a fine and large institution where more than ten thousand patients are treated annually. We have had our difficulties and many of them, but they have been overcome. Even the handicaps that we now experience and the expansion that is urgent to enlarge our capacity for more patients, all will eventually be taken care of. We feel encouraged even now that we will be able to start our building program within the present year and that ultimately we shall have a hospital that will take care of more than five hundred patients. In this magnificent work, the doctors of the community have played a most conspicuous part, but also our women’s auxiliaries, that great band of noble women, have rendered priceless service. To them, words are always inadequate to express our appreciation. But it is the spirit and the great cause which has enabled us to overcome many of the problems of the past, and that spirit I am confident will always prevail and give to the Allentown Hospital a long tenure in human service.

“Personally, I am indeed grateful for the splendid cooperation that was accorded me, not only by the Board of Trustees, but by everybody affiliated with the Hospital during these past twenty-four years, twenty-two of which I have served as your President. Naturally, I lay down the task with a great deal of

regret, and yet I feel greatly compensated and refreshed in the thought that I have at least played a small part in the growth and development of this fine institution. I wish for it an evergrowing source of strength and health. With heartfelt gratitude,

I bid you all God speed.”

In noting Mr. Gernerd’s death, the Board of Trustees had this to say of his activities through the longest period served by a Board President:

“To the Board and to the Hospital he brought the vitalizing and aggressive spirit which was an outstanding trait of his colorful personality. From the beginning of his service and continuing to its end, he diligently studied the changing conditions and current needs of the Hospital, and his informed judgments were constantly reflected in the actions and policies of the Board. He was always its zealous advocate, and as its representative in the court of public opinion his lofty eloquence effectually obtained increased support for and a deepened interest in the work of the institution.

“The Hospital was always central in his heart and mind. Beyond the call of duty, he freely dedicated valuable hours of a busy life to its administration, and was conversant with the exact details of its business management. His periodical visits to its patients brought healing and cheer; the auxiliaries regularly felt his enriching encouragement; and the staff was inspired to high endeavor by his cordial understanding of its special problems.

“His period of service coincided with the period of the largest expansion of the facilities of the Hospital, and in these projects he was our intrepid and energetic leader.

“His brilliant record of devotion and achievement will be a precious memory, and will inspire renewed and enlarged effort for the Hospital by all who labor for it.”

Attorney Reuben J. Butz, who was elected to the Board in 1920 and took an active part in developing and expanding the Hospital through nearly thirty years, was elected President in February 1949. He had previously been First Vice-president for many years and was the executive officer of the Board after the death of Mr. Gernerd.

To chronicle the devotion of each Trustee to the Hospital and to record in detail his life in and his services to the community would require volumes. Suffice it to say, they have been men of honor and distinction, men whose names are synonymous with the development of the community and the growth of the Hospital during their respective generations, men who have given of their time and their talents and their means to other institutions that serve the needs of their fellows as generously as they have given to the Hospital. Here they can only be listed and briefly identified as the record of their accomplishments in one field of endeavor, the Allentown Hospital, is recorded and appraised.

Henry W. Allison was named Chairman of the original Board of Trustees, appointed at the community meeting that first discussed proposals to establish a hospital, and served on that and on subsequent groups from 1892 until 1898. In 1910 he again was elected a Trustee of the Allentown Hospital Association and held office until his death on October 12, 1913. He was Secretary, Treasurer, and General Manager of the Allentown Rolling Mills and was Mayor of Allentown from 1888 to 1890 and again from 1893 to 1896.

Mrs. Caroline Anew alt, the daughter of Solomon and Anna, nee Saeger, Keck, was the wife of S. B. Anewalt, hat merchant and President of the Lehigh Valley Trust Company. She served only on the Board elected at the community meeting in December 1892.

Dr. A. H. Balliet, Ballietsville veterinarian, was the co-founder of the Eagle Cigar Box Company that under his sole ownership became the Balliet Cigar Box Company, in its day one of Allentown’s important industries. In community life he was best known as President of the Lehigh County Agricultural Society. He was a member of the Board from 1913 to 1923.

John Bowen, who founded the Hamilton Street retail grocery business that for two generations carried his name, was another member of the Board named in 1892 to establish a hospital. He built and sold nearly 100 homes in Allentown’s west end and was one of the organizers of the Lehigh Valley Trust Company, which he served as a Director and as a Vice-president.

J. B. Bronstein, Vice-president and General Manager of the Trojan Powder Company, has been a Trustee of the Hospital since 1934 and was active in associating it with the Hospital Service Plan of the Lehigh Valley which he helped establish. His present term expires in 1950.

Reuben J. Butz, Allentown attorney and senior member of the law firm of Butz, Steckel, Hudders and Rupp, is President of the Allentown National Bank, of the Allentown Clearing House Association, of the Board of Trustees of Muhlenberg College, and is a former President of the Chamber of Commerce. He was elected to the Hospital Board in 1920, and, after serving as its first Vice-president for many years and as Chairman of its Training School

H. W. Allison Temporary Chairman or the Group Which Organized the Allentown Hospital Association

The Reverend J. A. Singmaster, D.D. President or the Hospital Association 1896 to 1901

Judge Edward Harvey President or the Hospital Association 1902 to 1913

James F. Hunsicker President of the Hospital Association 1914 to 1926

Committee, was named President in February 1949. His present term expires in 1951.

Mrs. S. A. Butz devoted a lifetime of service to the community as one of the organizers of the Lehigh County Chapter of the American Red Cross and its Chairman for twenty-one years, President of the Y.W.C.A., President of the Needlework Guild, and a leader in many other civic and welfare groups. Her husband was a prominent lawyer. She was a member of the original Board, named at a community meeting in 1892.

Oliver N. Clauss served on the Board of Trustees from 1938 to 1947. He is a member of the firm of Clauss Brothers, wholesale shoe merchants, and a Vice-president and Director of the Merchants National Bank.

Henry Cole, Hamilton Street merchant and cooper who manufactured and sold wooden and willow ware, served on the Board from March 1895 until October of that year.

Frank M. Cressman, Executive Vice-president of the Allentown National Bank and President of the Board of Trustees of Cedar Crest College, was General Chairman of the Hospital Building Fund Campaign in 1944. He was elected to the Board in 1942 and his present term expires in 1950.

William Douglass was General Superintendent of the Iowa Barb Wire Works, which he helped establish in Allentown, and later of its successor, the American Steel and Wire Co. He served on the Board that was appointed in 1892 to develop plans for the founding of a hospital.

Joseph Downing was a manufacturer of fire bricks in Allentown. He was named to the original Board of Trustees, elected in 1892.

William N. Eberhard, a financier who was active in the development of building and loan organizations in Allentown, was Treasurer of the Hersh Hardware Company and is a Director of the Allentown National Bank. He is Treasurer of the Allentown Hospital Association and Chairman of the Finance Committee of the Board of Trustees on which he has served since 1924. His present term expires in 1949.

John W. Eckert, cement chemist and manufacturer, was President of the American Cement Company of Egypt and President of the Lehigh County Agricultural Society. He served on the Board from 1915 to 1929.

William E. Erdell was President of the Penn Allen Cement Company and Treasurer of the organization that erected and operated the Central Motoramp Garage. A member of the Board from 1926 until his death on March 20, 1943, he served as Chairman of the Finance Committee and later of the Executive Committee.

George F. Erich, dealer in coal and building materials, was Mayor of Allentown from 1940 to 1944. He was a Trustee from 1922 to 1924.

Dr. Orlando L. Fegley, first Chief Surgeon of the Allentown Hospital, was a member of the medical profession and one of the organizers of the Lehigh County Medical Society. He served on the Board of Trustees from 1895 until his death on March 10, 1900.

James F. Gallagher, Allentown school teacher and Americanization Director of Lehigh County, was a member of the Board from

1895 until 1898.

Fred B. Gernerd, elected to the Board in 1924 and its President from June 7, 1926 until his death on August 7, 1948, was a lawyer who gained recognition as President of the Pennsylvania Bar Association. He was the senior partner of the law firm of Gernerd, Helwig, and Gernerd, served as District Attorney of Lehigh County from 1907 to 1911, and represented the Berks-Lehigh Congressional District in the Sixty-seventh Congress of the United States.

John R. Gossler, founder of the Gossler Oil Co., was a member of the Board of Trustees elected in 1895 to revive interest in the establishment of the Hospital and to raise funds for it. He was Vice-president of the Board and served until his death in 1912. In public life he was Treasurer of Lehigh County from 1893 to 1896.

William O. Gross, Allentown clothing merchant, is the senior member of the firm of Bohlen, Gross, and Moyer and a Director of the Second National Bank. He was elected to the Board in 1946 for his first three-year term.

Nathan A. Haas was a member of the Board from 1899 until 1908. A merchant, manufacturer, and banker, he was a member of the shoe firm of N. A. Haas and Son, one of the founders of the Haas-Berger shoe factory, and an organizer of the Penn Trust Company which he served as President.

Dr. William H. Hartzell, the first Chief Physician of the Hospital, assisted in opening the institution and served as a Trustee from 1895 to 1905. He established his practice in Allentown in 1881 and was recognized as one of the community’s outstanding medical practitioners of his day. One of the organizers of the Citizens Deposit and Trust Company, he served as a Director and as its President.

Edward Harvey, lawyer and banker, was a member of the Board of Trustees from 1895 until his death on September 7, 1913, serving as President for the last eleven years. From his legacy of nearly $106,000 the Hospital erected the Harvey Memorial Nurses’ Home. He was the first President of the Lehigh County Bar Association, the President Judge of the Lehigh County Courts from June 14, 1878 until January 1879, and the President of the Second National Bank.

Max Hess, co-founder of Hess Brothers Department Store, served on the Board of Trustees from 1910 until 1914. He continued his interest in the Hospital until his death in February 1922.

Emil A. Hirner was a member of the Board from 1908 until his death on July 14, 1937 and for many years was chairman of its Executive Committee. A manufacturer of knitting machinery and of hosiery, he was a Vice-president of the Allentown National Bank.

Charles O. Hunsicker, an attorney who was Mayor of Allentown from 1909 to 1911, succeeded his father on the Board and served from 1926 until his death in 1941. At one time he was a member of the firm that published the Chronicle and News.

James F. Hunsicker was a member of the Board for thirty years and its President from January 12, 1914 until he resigned the office on January 8, 1926, a few months before his death. He was a founder and a member of the firm of Bittner, Hunsicker, and Company, wholesale drygoods dealers.

Harry W. Jordan, a tailor who became a partner in the men’s clothing firm of Koch Brothers and in the Hotel Allen, was elected to the Board in 1929 and served until his death on August 12, 1944.

Samuel F. Jordan, Treasurer of the Heilman Boiler Works, served on the Board from 1911 to 1920.

Andrew S. Keck, a prominent Allentown lumber dealer and one of the founders of the Lehigh Valley Trust Company, on whose directorate he served, was a member of the Hospital Board named in 1895 to establish the institution and served for one year.

Arthur E. Keller, associated with the jewelry firm of E. Keller and Sons, was named to the Board in 1919 and served until 1923.

Charles Kline, a merchant who founded and operated Kline’s Department Store in Allentown, was elected a Trustee in 1941. His present term expires in 1951. He is a Director of the Allentown National Bank.

Harvey H. Knerr was the President of the John Taylor Company, proprietors of the Globe Store, a department store once located at the northwest corner of Center Square. He was elected to the Hospital Board in 1920 and served until his death in 1934.

Frank W. Koch, one of the founders of the men’s clothing firm of Koch Brothers and partner in the Hotel Allen, was elected a Trustee in 1905 and served until his death on July 1, 1906.

Henry T. Koch has been a member of the Board since 1929. He is a partner in H. Leh and Company, Allentown department store, a Vice-president and Director of the Merchants National Bank, and a Director of the Allentown-Bethlehem Gas Company. His present term expires in 1950.

Thomas J. Koch, who served as a Trustee from 1906 to 1908, was one of the owners of Koch Brothers and of the Hotel Allen. He was one of the organizers of the Merchants National Bank and a member of its directorate.

E. N. Kroninger served on the Board from 1916 until his death in 1941 and was chairman of the Building Committee during the erection of the service building, the west wing, and the top floor of the nurses’ home. He was a grower of and wholesale dealer in flowers.

Peter J. Laubach, Northampton miller, brewer, and banker, was a Trustee from 1916 until his death in 1941. He was one of the founders of the Allen Trust Company in Northampton and served it as a Vice-president and as a Director.

W. R. Lawfer founded W. R. Lawfer and Co., Allentown’s original department store, and was one of the organizers of the Allentown YMCA and a Director of the Allentown National Bank. He was a member of the Board from 1892 to 1895.

Henry Leh was a member of the Board named in 1892 to develop plans for a hospital and continued to serve until his death on May 16, 1910. He was the founder of H. Leh and Company and for many years engaged in the shoe manufacturing business.

S. D. Lehr, an engineer who was active in building railroads, was Mayor of Allentown from 1890 to 1893. He called the community meeting in 1892 at which the organization of a hospital was first discussed publicly, and served one year on the Board of Trustees named at that meeting.

Reuben S. Leisenring, an Allentown insurance broker and real estate agent, was a member of the Hospital Board from 1899 until his death on June 13, 1911.

John E. Lentz, first Treasurer of the Allentown Hospital Association and the first person to make a gift to its endowment fund, was a shoe manufacturer and a wholesaler of shoes and rubbers. He was a Trustee from 1895 until his death on November 2, 1902.

Walter C. Lotte, who established the National Silk Dye Works in Allentown, has been a member of the Board since 1924 and its secretary since 1946. His present term expires in 1949.

Dr. Charles S. Martin, Allentown physician, was a member of the original committee designated to plan for a community hospital. He served on the Board from 1898 until his death on May 4, 1910 and was its Secretary and Business Manager from 1902 to 1910. On May 1, 1910, four days before his death, he took office as Postmaster of Allentown.

The Reverend John B. Maus, rector of the Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, was a member of the Board from 1895 until his death on January 9, 1899.

David A. Miller, founder of the Allentown Morning Call and one of the publishers of the Call-Chronicle Newspapers, was active in every Hospital fund raising endeavor, served on the Board from 1920 until 1946, and was its Secretary for twenty-five of those twenty-six years. He was General Chairman of the 1926 Building Fund Campaign. He is a Director of the Merchants National Bank.

George K. Mosser, industrialist and banker, was a member of the Board from 1906 to 1916. He was associated with his father in the tannery business, was a partner in the Lehigh Brick Works, a Director of the Lehigh Portland Cement Company, and Chairman of the Board of the Lehigh Valley Trust Company.

James K. Mosser was a Trustee from 1902 until his death in 1905. He provided the funds for the old west wing, erected in 1901, and his widow paid for the women’s ward annex built in 1905. His tannery enterprises were among the largest and most prosperous of his day.

William P. Moyer, a Trustee from 1898 to 1904 and a member of the first Building Committee, was a cigar manufacturer and built many of Allentown’s fine homes.

Louis P. Neuweiler, a former member of the firm of Louis F. Neuweiler’s Sons, brewers, is the President of the Merchants National Bank and a former President of the Lehigh Council, Boy Scouts of America. He has been a member of the Board of Trustees since 1928 and is the Chairman of its Executive Committee.

Henry P. Newhard, partner and superintendent of the Dent Hardware Company of Fullerton, was a Trustee from May 1924 to December of that year.

George Ormrod, Lehigh County industrialist, was the President, Treasurer, and General Manager of the Donaldson Iron Company in Emmaus, one of the organizers of the Lehigh Portland Cement Company, and had extensive interests in coal and iron. He served on the Board from 1906 until his death in 1915.

Charles E. Oakes, electrical engineer and utility executive, is President of the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company. He has been a member of the Board since 1946. His present term expires in 1950.

A. L. Reichenbach, City Treasurer of Allentown for twenty-four years, was its Mayor from 1915 to 1919. He was a Trustee from October 1913 until his death in 1920. The annex to the nurses’ home at the southwest corner of Seventeenth and Chew Streets was named in his honor after it had been partially paid for with funds raised to establish a memorial to him.

E. H. Reninger was an Allentown lawyer who devoted himself principally to banking, serving as President of the Lehigh Valley Trust Company which he helped organize. He was a Trustee from 1900 to 1919.

Claude T. Reno, a Judge of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania, has been solicitor for the Lehigh County Commissioners and for the City of Allentown, President Judge of the Lehigh County Courts, and Attorney General of Pennsylvania. He has been a member of the Board since 1925. His present term expires in 1949.

The Reverend S. A. Repass, who served on the Board from

1896 until his death in 1906, was pastor of St. John’s Evangelical

Lutheran Church from 1885 to 1906 and Professor of Christian Evidences at Muhlenberg College.

The Reverend George W. Richards served on the Board from

1895 to 1899 while he was Pastor of Salem Reformed Church. He later became President of the Seminary of the Reformed Church at Lancaster, President of the General Synod of the Evangelical and Reformed Church, and a leader in the ecumenical movement.

Thomas E. Ritter was active in the development of real estate in Allentown and was President of the Second National Bank. He was a Trustee from 1914 to 1919.

William J. Roberts, President of the Traylor Engineering and Manufacturing Company, has been a Trustee of the Hospital since 1934 and is the Chairman of its Building Committee. His present term expires in 1951.

Mrs. Mary L. Romig, the widow of Dr. William H. Romig, was the founder of the Needlework Guild and among the organizers of the first Auxiliary of the Allentown Hospital. She served on the Board in 1892 and early 1893. Her charitable interests were wide and varied.

Abraham Samuels was the proprietor of a women’s hat store and one of the organizers of the Merchants National Bank. He was a member of the Board from 1898 until his death on December 27, 1919 and its Secretary for nine of those years.

James L. Schaadt, a lawyer, served as District Attorney of Lehigh County and was Mayor of Allentown from 1899 to 1902. He was a member of the Board from 1908 until his death in 1924.

Dr. C. D. Schaeffer, physician and surgeon, was one of the leaders in the establishment of the Allentown Hospital, its Chief of Staff for nearly twenty-five years, and a member of the Board from 1898 until his death in 1923. He was Mayor of Allentown from 1907 to 1908 and was Vice-president of the Allentown National Bank.

Victor R. Schmidt, President of the Queen City Textile Corporation, of the Lehigh Spinning Company, and of the Kraemer Hosiery Company, is also a former President of the Allentown Chamber of Commerce. He is a Director of the Allentown National Bank. A member of the Board since 1945, he is Chairman of the Fiftieth Anniversary Committee. His present term expires in 1951.

Leonard Sefing was a contractor who erected such Allentown landmarks as the B. and B. Building at Sixth and Hamilton Streets, the Grand Central Hotel that later became Hess Brothers, and the Lyric Theatre. He was a Trustee from March 1895 to October of that year.

Hiram S. Shimer, carpet merchant, was one of the organizers of the Adelaide Silk Mill and a founder of the Lehigh Valley Trust Company which he served as Vice-president. He was a member of the Board from 1893 to 1898 and presided at the meeting at which the constitution of the Allentown Hospital Association was adopted.

Edward S. Shimer, dealer in rugs and oil cloth, was Allentown’s seventh Mayor, serving from 1884 to 1886. He was a Trustee during 1893.

The Reverend J. A. Singmaster, the first President of the Board of Trustees, was Pastor of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church from 1890 until 1900, when he was called to a Professorship at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, which he later served as President. He served on the Board of Trustees and was its President from 1895 until he left Allentown.

Mrs. Eleanor Soleliac was the wife of Louis Soleliac, Superintendent and Manager of the Adelaide Silk Mills, and was devoted to charitable and philanthropic endeavors. She was a Trustee in 1892 and early 1893.

Howard V. Swartz, President of the National Bank of Catasauqua and a banker in that community all of his life, has been a member of the Board since 1943. His present term expires in 1950.

William Thomas was President and General Manager of the Wahneta Silk Company, a Catasauqua industry. He was a Trustee from 1919 to 1922.

Edwin G. Trexler was identified with the lumber industry in Pennsylvania and in Allentown but devoted much of his time to activities on behalf of welfare and charitable organizations. He was a Trustee from 1904 until 1927.

General Harry C. Trexler was a leader in the establishment of many Allentown industrial and business enterprises, among them the Trexler Lumber Company, the Lehigh Portland Cement Company whose board he headed, the Lehigh Valley Transit Company,

Attorney Fred B. Gernerd President of the Hospital Association 1926 to 1948

Attorney Reuben J. Butz, LL.D. President or the Hospital Association 1949

the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company, and the Consolidated Telephone Company. His Estate generously supports the Hospital he served as a Trustee for a few months in 1895 and then from

1896 to 1898.

Mrs. Mary Trexler, wife of General Harry C. Trexler, was named to the first Board of Trustees elected in 1892. She devoted much of her time to charitable and welfare activities in the community.

William H. Yeager, founder of the Yeager Furniture Company, was one of the Trustees elected in 1892 at the initial community meeting to plan for a hospital.

Colonel Edward M. Young, industrialist and banker, was one of the organizers of the Lehigh Portland Cement Company and served as President of that organization and of the Lehigh Valley Trust Company. He served briefly as a Trustee in 1898 and then was a member of the Board from 1902 to 1929.

THEIR LABORS LIVE

Appraising a hospital and its services to a community, the historian can do no better than adopt the pattern of the recognized accrediting organizations and attempt to evaluate the qualities and the qualifications of those who as members of the professional staff direct the care of its patients. In this measure, the balance is heavily weighted in favor of the Allentown Hospital.

It has been this Hospital’s good fortune, and indeed the even better fortune of the nearly 240,000 patients it has been able to admit, to attract to its Staff men and women whose names have become community bywords and whose professional attainments have both merited and received the highest recognition. Physicians and surgeons with outstanding qualities of heart and mind, they have devoted themselves unselfishly and many times without recompense to the care of those who specifically sought their services and to others who, needing those same ministrations, sought them simply by going to the Allentown Hospital, confident that there they would find skilled and willing hands motivated by kindness and by understanding sympathy. This reputation, more than any other single factor, is responsible for the zealousness with which the Board of Trustees has guarded membership on the Staff, not only through the early period of the Hospital’s history but also down through the years.

From the group of eleven physicians and surgeons selected to open the Hospital in 1899, the Staff has increased through fifty years to a corps of twenty-four department chiefs and fifty-two associates, men and women who spend a part of practically every day in the Hospital treating not only their own private patients but also rendering other services assigned to them from the free clinics or by the Chief of Staff. Their duties include instructions for internes, residents, and nurses on duty in the Hospital and teaching assignments in the School of Nursing. With the exception

of the Chief of the Department of Radiology and the Chief of the Department of Pathology, who receive no fees directly from hospital patients, they serve without compensation from the Hospital. Nearly one hundred more physicians, surgeons, dentists, and dental surgeons, unable to devote as much time to hospital work or more actively associated with other institutions, are members of the Auxiliary Staff. Scores of others, members of the medical and dental societies of Lehigh and surrounding counties, enjoy Hospital privileges and use the facilities of the Allentown Hospital for the care of at least some of their private patients.

The Major Staff, and of it the Allentown Hospital is justly proud, includes eleven department chiefs and twelve associates who have been certified as specialists in their respective fields after meeting the rigid requirements of the various American Boards that determine standards of training. The Department of Surgery includes five men certified by the American Board of Surgery. Three members of the Department of Ophthalmology Staff are certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology and a like number in the Ear, Nose, and Throat Department hold certification from the American Board of Otolaryngology. Two men in the Neuro-psychiatric Department have been certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and other members of the Major Staff hold certification from the American Boards of Internal Medicine, Surgery and Proctology, Plastic Surgery, Radiology, Clinical Pathology, Anatomical Pathology, Dermatology and Syphilology, Orthopedic Surgery, and Urology. At least a half-dozen others, younger members of the Staff, have completed the graduate work and clinical training necessary for certification and are preparing for the examinations given by their respective boards. More are working toward that objective. Practically every member of the Staff has a record of graduate work in post-graduate medical schools and clinics and several of them have earned advanced degrees in their specialties. Nearly a score are Fellows of the American College of Surgeons and others hold fellowships or memberships in the International College of Physicians and Surgeons, the American College of Physicians, the American College of Radiology, the College of American Pathology, the National Gastro-enterological Association, the American College of Dermatology and Syphilology, the International College of Anaesthetists, the American Academy for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of General Practice, the American Urological Society, the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, and similar groups. All are members or fellows of the American Medical Association and through membership in their professional societies, through seminars, clinics, and study at the nation’s foremost medical centers keep constantly abreast with the developments in their own spheres of the increasingly exacting science of medicine and surgery. Several, the record will show, hold teaching assignments in medical schools; others have rejected invitations to share their time with institutions remote from Allentown. Many are listed as associates and consultants on the staffs of other area hospitals, another mark of esteem both for them and for the institution that claims the major part of their professional service.

There were no such standardizing organizations and the Lehigh County Medical Society itself was a mere infant when the Board of Trustees met on May 12, 1899, ten days before the Hospital was opened, to select the first Staff from the roster of the twenty-four family doctors then serving the community. Their task was not an easy one and their decisions were of necessity based on their own intimate knowledge of the interest, the willingness, the enthusiasm, and the personal and professional qualifications of the physicians and surgeons available. That not all members of the profession were interested in the establishment of a hospital or willing to support it was evident in the fact that only ten are listed among the original members of the Allentown Hospital Association and that only nine others joined the group during the years between its formal organization and the opening of the Hospital.

Dr. Orlando Fegley, a 58-year-old veteran of the Civil War who was a member of the Committee of Fifteen named at a community meeting to devise means for establishing a hospital, was elected the first Surgeon-in-chief. Associated with him as Assistant Surgeons were Dr. Charles D. Schaeffer, Dr. A. J. Yost, Dr. Daniel Hiestand, and Dr. R. E. Albright. Dr. W. H. Hartzell was elected Physician-in-chief and his associates, elected as Assistant Physicians, were Dr. C. S. Martin, Dr. H. H. Herbst, Dr. C. J. Otto, and Dr. L F. Huebner. Dr. George F. Seiberling, named Ophthalmologist, and Dr. M. F. Cawley, the Pathologist, completed the first regular staff roster. To advise with the new Staff, the Board named Dr. John B. Deaver, eminent Philadelphia surgeon, and Dr. H. Y. Horn of Coplay as Surgical Consultants. Dr. H. H. Riegel of Catasauqua, and Dr. W. B. Erdman of Macungie, were appointed Medical Consultants.

In his report to the Hospital Association in January 1900, President Singmaster noted that because of illness Dr. Fegley had not been able to assume his duties and that Dr. C. D. Schaeffer had been appointed to temporarily take his place. Dr. Schaeffer, who in actuality was the first man to serve as Surgeon-in-chief and as Chief of Staff, was formally elected to succeed Dr. Fegley on January 1, 1900, and held the position until his death on September 2, 1923. He was succeeded by Dr. Robert L. Schaeffer, a remote cousin, who has been associated with the Allentown Hospital for forty-one of its fifty years.

Although Dr. Fegley was active in the establishment of the Hospital, he was never able to serve within its doors. Born in Boyertown, he was a product of its public schools and a teacher in them until he became a student at Gettysburg College. He interrupted his studies at Gettysburg at the outbreak of the Civil War to enlist in a company organized by the President of the College and it was not until after the war, during which he was taken prisoner by the Confederate forces, that he was graduated from college. Upon his graduation from the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1867, he established a practice in Allentown, with offices at 544-46 North Front Street, and then in association with Dr. J. H. Borneman, conducted a drugstore at that address. Later he purchased the interests of his partner and, with his brother, Dr. William L. Fegley, operated the store under the name of Dr. Fegley and Brother. He died in Allentown on March 10, 1900.

That his work was a valuable asset in the establishment of the Allentown Hospital is indicated by this minute, adopted by the Board of Trustees on May 11, 1900:

“Once again we are forcibly reminded of the Almighty’s inexorable decree that all men are born to die. Death is a constant menace; it lurks in life’s pathway; none can foretell nor avoid the hour of its dread approach. This summons came unexpectedly and too soon for our worthy colleague and fellow member, Dr. Orlando Fegley, who fell asleep peacefully March 10, 1900 at 12:15 a.m. The startling news could scarcely be accepted as a reality, but it was none the less too true. The angel of death had come and gone, the removal was complete, until blissful eternity may once more commingle our mutual fellowship.

“Dr. Fegley was a man of genial nature, kind, charitable, moral and upright; and possessed the virtues that constitute the true man, good physician, and valuable trustee. Living, he was esteemed, beloved, and respected by all who knew him. Dead, he furnishes cause for deep and sincere mourning. But his life’s work is now completed, his mission has been fulfilled, and he has gone to meet his God, and in our efforts to pay due respect and reverence to his sacred memory let us cause a page of our records to be set aside and inscribe thereon this memorial in testimony of our high regard and esteem and as a lasting tribute to his memory.”

Dr. Charles D. Schaeffer, under the rules that governed the Hospital during his nearly twenty-four years of service as Physician and Surgeon-in-chief, had direct supervision of and responsibility for the care of the 41,849 patients admitted to the institution in that period. He was the dynamic force that led in the development of the Hospital and that laid the foundations upon which succeeding generations have built.

“His object in life,” the late Mayor James L. Schaadt once wrote, “was purely the development of a great institution for healing, the Hospital, and of an equally great institution for the education of those who assist in healing, the Nurses’ College. To this object he sacrificed everything else that men in the professions often follow: ambition, pleasure, diversion, giving himself heart and soul to the Hospital and to the College. The Hospital remains the monument to his memory and whenever it will be spoken of in the future, Dr. Schaeffer will be thought of.”

The man who as a Trustee and as head of the Staff was to take the lead in the management of the Hospital and in its development through nearly all of the first quarter-century of its expanding service, was called as an Assistant Surgeon, but immediately assumed the duties of Surgeon-in-chief. He began has active association with the Hospital when he was thirty-five years old and after having practiced his profession for only ten years. Like his predecessor, Dr. Fegley, he was a native of Berks County, one of five brothers who achieved distinction and honor in medicine, education, the ministry, the law, and in agriculture. After spending the early years of his life on his father’s farm in Maxatawny township and in the schools of that community, he attended the Kutztown State Normal School and Franklin and Marshall College, graduating from the latter in 1886. Three years later he was graduated from the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania and in the same year opened his offices in Allentown at 130 North Seventh Street, later moving them to 30 North Eighth Street.

Although there are no existing documents that define his early duties as Surgeon-in-chief or as Surgeon-in-chief and Physician-in-chief, the combined post to which he was elected when it was created in 1902, he was directly responsible, personally and through his assistants, for the diagnosis, treatment, and care of every patient admitted to the Hospital from May 22, 1899 until he left the Hospital for the last time on February 8, 1923. The record credits him with personally performing 22,000 major and minor operations during the years of his intense activity.

In June 1914, after the title of Director also had been added to Dr. Schaeffer’s duties as Physician and Surgeon-in-chief, the Board specifically defined his duties as follows:

“1. A member of the medical profession shall be elected by the Board of Trustees to perform the duties of Physician and Surgeon-in-chief and Director. He shall supervise and direct the medical and surgical staff, all employes, and the affairs of the institution as provided by the rules and regulations and as may be further directed from time to time by the Board of Trustees. He shall hold office for a period of three years, dating from the day of his election.

“2. He shall have complete control of the medical and surgical treatment of patients in the Hospital, perform, or cause to be performed, all necessary surgical operations; direct all medical treatment, revise and direct all diet of patients; have control and direction of all assistants, nurses, attendants, and employes in and about the Hospital.

“3. He shall keep a faithful record of all admissions and discharge of patients, setting forth their condition when admitted and discharged, keep an account of all operations performed and the result of the same; maintain strict discipline; and be the general representative of the Board of Trustees of the institution.

“4. As Physician and Surgeon-in-chief and Director, he shall be the executive head of the Hospital, subject only to the direction of the Board of Trustees.

“5. He shall keep an inventory and have custody of all instruments, apparatus, books, stores, furniture, and other property belonging to the Hospital; purchase provisions, stores, and supplies; and see that there is no waste or carelessness in any department.

“6. He shall keep a separate book for the annual inventory. The same is to be so printed and ruled that it may be used for a number of years, and shall show explicit and detailed comparisons from year to year. This shall be kept separate and apart from the account books in which the annual inventories ordinarily appear.

“7. He shall sign requisitions for purchases of each department, and permit no purchase to be made except upon such requisition. Purchases of any article in excess of One Hundred Dollars shall not be made without the sanction of at least two members of the Executive Committee, and contracts for permanent fixtures or improvements shall not be entered into without the endorsement of the Board of Trustees.

“8. He shall keep accounts of all moneys received or disbursed on behalf of the Hospital, with a record of all contracts authorized or made by him, and submit monthly reports of same, together with a statement of outstanding indebtedness, to the Executive Committee. These records shall be certified monthly to the Board of Trustees through the minutes of the Executive Committee.

“9. He shall keep a separate book to record all endowments and bequests. This record shall explicitly show the intent and purpose of the party bequeathing the money, and an annual statement shall be made therein of the interest earned and how and for what purpose the same was applied.

“10. He shall submit all bills and pay rolls to the Executive Committee for approval.

“11. He shall take charge of all moneys or other valuables belonging to patients and keep a careful record of same. The property of patients shall be placed in separate packages, duly marked, and protected from injury or theft.

“12. When a patient is dangerously ill, he shall notify his friends and pastor and see that every kindness and courtesy is extended to relieve their distress. He shall deliver the bodies of such as may die to their friends or the proper authorities; and perform or have performed no autopsy without the written consent of a close relative or friend of the deceased.

“13. He shall see that the Hospital attendants are properly instructed as to their respective duties in case of fire, and shall prepare regulations to govern such a contingency. Fire hose and fire extinguishers shall be tested at least once every three months.

“14. He is authorized to make any rules and regulations for the government of employes, and for the treatment of patients, and for the general management of the Hospital, not inconsistent with the Constitution and Rules and Regulations of the Board of Trustees.

“15. He shall have power in case of violation by any member of the Staff of any of the rules of the Hospital, or in case of deportment inconsistent with its good name or efficiency, to suspend such offender. In such case he shall immediately report the matter to the Executive Committee who shall promptly consider the complaint and report the circumstances in detail, together with a recommendation, to the Board of Trustees for final disposition. Cases of violation by any one not included in the Staff of the Hospital shall be summarily disposed of by the Physician and Surgeon-in-chief and Director.

“16. The Staff referred to in the foregoing rule consists of assistant surgeons, pathologist, X-ray operator, and directress of nurses.

“17. He shall engage all employes not otherwise provided

for in these rules.

“18. He shall report fully at each meeting of the Executive

Committee all matters connected with the administration of the Hospital; and at the annual meeting make a careful and accurate report of the work done in the Institution during the year.

“19. The Physician and Surgeon-in-chief and Director of the Hospital shall in no wise encroach through undue influence upon the practice of any physician or surgeon of this or any neighboring community.

“20. Patients temporarily treated at the Hospital are expected to return to their own physicians upon their discharge from the Institution.

“21. To encourage patients to call in their own physicians after leaving the Institution and at the same time assure them of the continued interest in their cases by the Hospital, the Physician and Surgeon-in-chief and Director shall, whenever requested by the medical practitioner, consult with and assist him without fee in the treatment of any case discharged from the Institution.

“22. That each patient may be thoroughly informed upon the desire of the authorities that he return to his own physician, and that his doctor whenever he desires may have the benefit of the advice of the Hospital’s Physician and Surgeon-in-chief and Director, a printed copy of this rule shall be handed to each patient upon his discharge.

“23. The compensation of the Physician and Surgeon-in-chief and Director, Assistant Surgeons, and X-ray operator shall be the reasonable fee paid for surgical operations, X-ray examinations, and treatment by those pecuniarily able to pay for the same.”

Two years later, at the suggestion of Dr. Schaeffer, the Trustees and the Association again revised the rules and vested responsibilities of business management in a Board of Superintendents that included the Physician and Surgeon-in-chief, the Directress of Nurses, and one Trustee. At the same time, a financial secretary was appointed and a new system of bookkeeping was established.

The rules, however, continued to give Dr. Schaeffer “supreme charge of all surgical operations and medical treatments,” specifying that the Physician and Surgeon-in-chief invite physicians sending patients to the Hospital to be present during the examination of the patient and during the operation and “to see that every courtesy is extended to the doctor if he favors by calling on the patient while in the institution.”

“Surgical and medical practitioners other than those on the Staff are always welcome at the Hospital,” the rules of 1916 emphasized, “particularly during an operation, and will be given every information about their patients and the general affairs of the institution. Patients may have their own doctors in consultation at any time during their period in the Hospital. Physicians in attendance upon persons suffering from any contagious disease are forbidden to visit the operating room, obstetrical department, and children’s ward. Contagious and chronic cases, insane persons, delirium tremens, venereal and incurable diseases cannot be admitted as patients.”

When he spoke at the dedication of the Harvey Memorial in 1915, at a period when there was considerable agitation for wider staff privileges, Dr. J. Chalmer DaCosta, Professor of Surgery at Jefferson Hospital, had this to say in defense of the policies under which the Allentown Hospital was being operated:

“Fine buildings are eminently desirable, but the staff is more important still. Good surgery can be done in very poor buildings, but a palace can’t make an incompetent do good surgery. A beanstalk won’t grow grapes even though it is trained on an arbor. The trustees of a hospital must select the members of the staff with scrupulous care, select them purely because of fitness, and decline to be swayed by any influence, personal, religious, social, or political. There is no such thing as a friendly cancer, a Baptist strangulated hernia, an aristocratic carbuncle or a Republican fracture, and hence there is no need of a surgeon whose only claim is in some such name. A serviceable staff, built on scientific lines, contains a specialist for every branch. In this age, there is so much to learn in each branch that the ordinary man cannot be thoroughly equipped in two or more. When a good staff is once chosen, the trustees should defend it, believe in it, give full attention to its recommendations, never lightly disregard its views on technical matters, and save it from dilution by the unworthy. A medical director should be at the head of the staff. He should manage the hospital and should be responsible to the trustees. Divided authority means failure.

“As a rule, hospital staffs do contain the best available men of their respective communities, men who study, men who observe, men who report their interesting cases, men who ably, scientifically, and conscientiously perform their duties; who never use the institution for self-advancement or to damage professional brothers; who never blow the bellows of puffery; who never beat the great drum to attract the attention of the galleries; men who never get mixed in identifying the trump of Fame from the horn of Plenty and the tin whistle of Notoriety; men who seek for reputation among their brother doctors rather than the general public, and men who are in earnest. This Hospital has the men as well as the buildings. Such a staff, more than the finest buildings, causes all medical men in a neighborhood to look upon a hospital with respect and to

send with confidence their patients to it.”

Strikingly similar is this observation by Dr. Lucius W. Johnson, a member of the Hospital Department Staff of the American College of Surgeons, speaking at one of the sessions of the Hospital Standardization Conference in Los Angeles in 1948:

“The American College of Surgeons is not opposed to allowing surgery to be done by general practitioners who are properly qualified to perform the particular type of work under consideration. The attitude of the College is that privileges in the hospital should be granted to each physician commensurate with his training, ability, and ethical conduct. The extent of the privileges should be decided by a qualified committee of the staff, in a manner clearly stated in the by-laws of the hospital ... A state license gives the doctor the right to perform any operation, whether it is needed or not, and without regard to his judgment or technical ability. Therefore it becomes necessary for the hospital to establish safeguards for the patient, to protect him from the dangers of unnecessary surgery and incompetent surgeons. Before a hospital can become approved by the American College of Surgeons it must be made evident that such safeguards have been set up and that they are enforced ... If voluntary hospitals and independent practice of medicine are to continue, then the trustees, the medical staffs, and the administrators must combine to accomplish these things: (1) Emphasize constantly the basic fact that every act and decision in the hospital must be in harmony with the purpose of providing the best care of the patient; (2) Enforce the rules and by-laws which protect the patient from unnecessary surgery and from incompetent operators; (3) Settle all disputes on a fair basis within the hospital group; (4) Bear in mind that every split-up of the medical staff into opposing factions, every rift among staff, trustees, and administration, is detrimental to the patient.”

It was also at Dr. Schaeffer’s suggestion in 1916 that the Board, through a fee committee, established the charges for medical and surgical treatment and determined who was able to pay them. Under these rules, which continued in effect until June 1924, all fees were paid directly to the Hospital. Remuneration for the Medical and Surgical Staff, with the exception of the X-ray operator and the Pathologist who were salaried, was on the basis of seventy per cent of the gross receipts for all surgical operations and medical treatment in the Hospital. The Surgeon-in-chief received forty per cent and his assistants equally divided thirty per cent. The remaining thirty per cent of the fees earned by the Staff was contributed to the Hospital, first for maintenance, and, after May 10, 1918, at the request of the Staff, into a “staff fund” set aside for the purchase of land and the extension of the Hospital.

Here again, Dr. Schaeffer indicated his unselfish interest in the Hospital for, in making the recommendation, he wrote to the Board:

“In doing so permit me to repeat what I have so often told you and others of the Board, that the Hospital’s success is ever uppermost in my mind and that the finances that come to me are of a thousand times less importance.

“That this may not be misunderstood, you and the Board are at liberty without consulting me, and I so desire it, should I continue as Chief Surgeon, to fix my remuneration and I further agree that in any year of my service that the Hospital may need the money, the Board to be the sole judge, I will present to the institution the whole of what is allotted me during said period.”

Dr. Schaeffer’s personal contributions to the Hospital were many and freely given, oftimes without official credit. He purchased instruments and equipment from his own funds and made many gifts to building and to maintenance accounts. Although records are spotty, they are sufficient to substantiate gifts approaching $50,000.

With the responsibilities that were placed upon the shoulders of Dr. Schaeffer, it is of little wonder that when he expressed a desire to volunteer for military service during World War I, the Board sought to dissuade him. At a special meeting on September 20, 1918, the following resolution was made a part of the record:

“The Allentown Hospital Association appreciates the desire expressed by its Chief Surgeon, Physician, and Director, Dr.

C. D. Schaeffer, to extend his usefulness during the present war by volunteering his services to the Nation, but presumes, however, to call his attention to certain local conditions and needs which he should consider in the interest of the civilian as well as military population of Allentown and surrounding territory.

“The Hospital with its approximately 350 beds, its separate buildings and grounds for treatment of contagious and infectious diseases, its separate buildings and grounds devoted to the training and housing of over one hundred nurses, and an exceptional staff, provides surgical and medical accommodations for a community of several hundred thousand people and represents in buildings, furnishings, and equipment an investment of close to $1,000,000. Besides the civilian population, it provides treatment for the soldiers of Camp Crane numbering variously from 3,000 to 5,000.

“The Association, while acknowledging the support of the people and paying tribute to the ability of its general surgical, medical, and nursing staff, hereby emphatically declares that the Hospital’s success in the past has been due to the skill, energy, and heart of its chief, Dr. Schaeffer. Further, that its continued progress and the welfare of hundreds of thousands of people in the vicinity, tens of thousands of whom are engaged in war industries, are largely dependent upon his skill.

“The Board of Directors are individually and collectively engaged in every war effort within their scope and admire Dr. Schaeffer’s aim to still further expand his usefulness. They, however, respectfully register a protest against the doctor severing his connection with the Hospital and appeal that instead of leaving, he advise those petitioning his service of the serious conditions and the grave necessities at home.”

On another occasion Dr. Schaeffer was offered the chair of Professor of Medicine in the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania but declined, preferring, as one chronicler expressed it, “to remain the Good Samaritan in Allentown.” He found time, however, to serve as Chairman of Allentown’s Board of Health, and from April 1907 until the end of 1908 was Mayor of the City. As Allentown’s chief executive, first by appointment and then by election, he completed the term of Mayor Alfred J. Yost, who died in office.

While performing an operation in 1916, seven years prior to his death, a rubber glove tore and he developed an infection that, in spite of surgical treatment, continued to undermine his health. In February 1923 he accompanied a group of 150 surgeons from this country and Canada to the Congress of American Surgeons at Buenos Aires where, even though he had planned to rest and relax, he delivered an important address and took an active part in discussions and deliberations. On his arrival in New York he contracted pneumonia. Resulting complications caused his death on September 2, 1923.

His place in the service of the Allentown Hospital is aptly expressed in these resolutions adopted by the Board of Trustees on September 14, 1923:

“Almost three decades have passed since our people awoke to a realization of the need of a public institution for the relief of the sick. A few years earlier there had come among us a young man who had been born and bred in a neighboring county. He had just completed the study of his chosen profession in medicine and had selected our city as the place for his life work. Eagerly he entered into the lists with his competitors, and the ability which he early exhibited, coupled with his zest for work, soon won for him an enviable place among practitioners in medicine. To no one more than to this young doctor did the movement for the foundation of a hospital present a stronger appeal. He was ever forceful and his zeal aided

much in crystallizing the sentiment which led a group of representative men of our community to incorporate the Allentown Hospital Association.

“The beginning of our Hospital was modest. In the remote outskirts of the city, as it then was, on the edge of a woods, a relatively small building was erected. The city grew apace and the Hospital with it. First one wing was added and then another and these in turn were followed by additional buildings and improvements. Equipment was purchased when needed. Nearby tracts of land were acquired so as to make possible the dreams of the future. The Harvey Memorial, whose outward expression is the beautiful and commodious Nurses’ College, became an actuality. If the material progress of our institution has been substantial, if we have been able during these years to make suitable provision for a people which at least doubled in population, if we received much credit at home and abroad for efficient management, then let it be known that he whose death we mourn has brought us hitherto.

“The first staff of the Hospital included Charles D. Schaeffer. After a while he became its Chief Surgeon and so continued until he passed from us. Year by year his interest in the work grew until finally he became so immersed in it that it was a very part of his being. Early and late he labored for the welfare of our Hospital and it is not surprising that he grew to love it with the deep affection which is ever engendered for the one or the cause for whom or for which we pour out the best that is in us. It was the apple of his eye and he watched over it with jealous care. Let no one think that he charged himself only with the wielding of the scalpel and the wellbeing of the patients. His counsel had great weight in moulding the policy adopted by this Board and no detail in administration was deemed by him too unimportant for his consideration; in fact, he shouldered a goodly portion of the business management. He was always endeavoring to develop the financial support so necessary in the maintenance of a public benefaction and had a large success in holding the friendly interest of the contributors.

“The name of Dr. Schaeffer and of the Allentown Hospital are inseparably linked. For many years past the mention of one had suggested the thought of the other. In its operating room he developed a surgical skill which made both him and the institution famous. Many are they who hold him in grateful remembrance for the sufferings which he alleviated and for the lives he saved. Great has been his usefulness, and what a blessing would have rested upon our people, if that rare talent, growing constantly riper throughout the years, could have been exercised in his wonted place until threescore years and ten would have passed over his head.

“This record has thus far dealt exclusively with our associate’s relation to the Hospital. While we recognize that here

he won his greatest laurels, while we acknowledge that in a sense he was the creator of this institution and its mainstay, while we looked upon him as our leader and his passing has left us adrift without a pilot, yet this minute would be very incomplete if reference were not made to his helpfulness in other fields of usefulness. He was a well-rounded man. Although he was distinguished as a surgeon, he had his splendid reputation as a physician and no other doctor in our community ever enjoyed so large a practice. Then he also had a sound business judgment which enabled him, not only to deal well with his personal affairs, but to assist in the management of other interests with profit to those concerned. He was a Director of the Allentown National Bank for twenty years and more and its Vice-president for at least fifteen years, and he served as Mayor of our city with great credit. He was usually successful in whatever he undertook. His good judgment, his quick and sound conclusions, his untiring energy, his manly self-reliance, his earnestness, his integrity, and his reverence for his God are the elements which formed his character and made the man what he was.

“Dr. Schaeffer died a martyr to his work. A constitution even as robust as his could not withstand the strain which years of devotion to his patients had placed upon it. Whenever they called, whenever there was pain to relieve, whenever there was a life which perhaps might be saved, he, regardless of self, though every year his strength was being sapped more and more, went from one to the other, — now ministering in the sickroom and next standing before the operating table, until an incurable malady seized hold of him and laid him low. After a lingering illness of many months he died on September 2, 1923, at the early age of 58 years, 9 months, and 28 days.

“He was a man of strong personality and was at times beset with the opposition which a courageous purpose frequently begets in those who hold diverse views. He held his course in life with a steady oar, though at times storms beset him. He was ever calm and resourceful and the end crowned his work.

“He was a cup of strength to many on beds of pain and a great comfort to many loving hearts who watched in sorrow.

In the Great Beyond his good deeds do follow him. In the brighter days which have followed his patient months of waiting on his bed of sickness the good wishes of many friends attend him. May he rest in peace.”

The group associated with Dr. Schaeffer during the years the Hospital operated on a substantially “closed staff” basis was small when compared with today’s Staff. When he was named Physician and Surgeon-in-chief in 1902 his assistants were Dr. Daniel Hiestand, who continued in that capacity until 1905; Dr. Calvin J. Otto, who served until 1916, when he resigned; and Dr. J. Treichler Butz, who left the Staff in 1907 to become Allentown’s Health Officer. Dr. Morris Cawley was Pathologist, serving until 1904 when he was succeeded by Dr. William A. Hausman, the Hospital’s first interne. Dr. Joseph M. Weaver became Pathologist in 1907 and served until 1914 when he was named Assistant Physician, the same year in which Dr. Robert L. Schaeffer, who had joined the Staff in 1910 as Anaesthetist, was elected Assistant Surgeon. Dr. Warren D. Kleppinger was Pathologist from 1914 until his death in October 1915 when he was succeeded by Dr. John E. Lear. Dr. Edward J. Feldhoff, named X-ray Operator in 1907, became an Assistant Surgeon in 1916. In that year Dr. William J. Hertz was elected Ophthalmologist, Dr. Forrest G. Schaeffer was named to the newly-created post of Obstetrician, and Dr. William C. Troxell was elected Roentgenologist. In 1918, Dr. Foster Beck was added to the Staff, in charge of contagious diseases, and Dr. Warren Butz was named to direct the dispensary. Two years later, Dr. Rowland Bachman and Dr. Elmer H. Bausch were named to the Staff, the former as Anaesthetist and the latter as Chief of what then was known as the Venereal Disease Department.

The death of Dr. C. D. Schaeffer, just short of the Hospital’s twenty-fifth anniversary, marked the end of an era. Upon the foundations so firmly established under his leadership, Dr. Robert L. Schaeffer and his associates during the second quarter-century have built the Allentown Hospital of today, an institution that has merited the highest recognition of the American Medical Association and of the American College of Surgeons. In a single year it has cared for as many patients as were admitted during the first seventeen years of its service to the community.

Lauding the present Chief of Staff for his “everlasting cheerfulness and willingness to serve at any hour of the day or night,” Attorney Reuben J. Butz, a Trustee for thirty years, told a group assembled to honor Dr. Schaeffer on his twenty-fifth anniversary as a member of the Staff that “while Dr. C. D. Schaeffer laid the groundwork on which the Allentown Hospital was built, it was Dr. Robert L. Schaeffer’s indefatigable work and recognized ability that made it what it is today. Regardless of activities of trustees and efficiency of nursing staff, the success of a hospital depends upon the proficiency of its Chief Surgeon. We may well say that Dr. Bob has established this Hospital in the hearts of the people of Allentown.”

Through his association with the Allentown Hospital during all but nine of its fifty years, Dr. Schaeffer has earned the distinction


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George W. Sherer, Superintendent 1924 —

Ray T. Kern, Sr.    Orlando M. Bowen

Assistant Superintendent    Assistant Superintendent

of having served it longer than any other individual identified with it as Trustee, as Staff member, as nurse, or as employe. During his tenure as Chief of Staff alone, nearly 200,000 patients have been admitted to the Hospital and more than 900 nurses of the 1,171 graduated from the School of Nursing have completed their training. He has performed at least 35,000 operations and assisted in the training of 204 internes and residents, among them his daughter, Dr. Frances C. Schaeffer, and his son, Dr. Charles D. Schaeffer. More than thirty of the seventy-six men now on the Major Staff of the Hospital served as internes or as residents under his tutelage.

During the war years, when the sharply curtailed number of physicians and surgeons and internes in civilian service made it necessary for Dr. Schaeffer and other members of the Staff to assume duties far beyond their normal measure, Attorney Fred B. Gernerd, President of the Board of Trustees, made this official comment at an annual meeting of the Hospital Association:

“Those of us intimately associated with the daily activities of the Hospital, marvel at the physical endurance of our great Surgeon-in-chief, Dr. Robert L. Schaeffer, who by his extraordinary skill performs the countless number of operations that urgently present themselves from day-to-day.”

But Dr. Schaeffer has been more than the Hospital’s Chief of Staff and Chief Surgeon. He has been its closest friend, one of its most ardent advocates in the court of public opinion, among its most generous financial supporters. Although his total gifts to the Hospital will never be known, even to himself, in one campaign alone he contributed $50,000 and in others, for building and for other purposes, his gifts increased his recorded benefactions to more than $75,000. These figures do not include produce from his farms, a share of which it has been his custom for many years to contribute to the Hospital. Neither do they include the instruments and equipment he has from time to time purchased for the operating room with his own funds; the entertainment he has provided to win friends and support for the institution; the thousands of hours he has contributed to details of management beyond his duties as Chief of Staff. His has been the vision that has inspired firm and steady growth, his the arguments that generally implemented plans and decided policies, and his the strength to lead in carrying those programs and policies to fruition. The Allentown Hospital has been and is today his vocation and his avocation; his work and his pleasure; with his family and his Church, the core of his life. A man of simple tastes and of no affectations, he has given himself cheerfully, willingly, and unselfishly to the service of others, content to be regarded simply as a friend.

He has never forsaken the practice he established in Allentown in 1909, but his entire professional career has known nothing other than close association with the Allentown Hospital. Graduating from the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1908, he became associated with the Hospital in the early summer of that year as an interne. After establishing his practice he assisted Dr. C. D. Schaeffer almost daily in the administration of anaesthesia and in 1910 was officially designated as Anaesthetist. Four years later he was named to the Staff as Anaesthetist and Assistant Surgeon, working under Dr. C. D. Schaeffer, who was a cousin of Dr. Robert Schaeffer’s father. In February 1923, when Dr. C. D. Schaeffer left for South America, Dr. Robert Schaeffer became Acting Surgeon-in-chief and on July 11, 1924, after the rules of the Hospital had been changed to provide for a larger Staff and for what sometimes is referred to as “an open hospital”, he was officially elected Chief of Staff and Chief Surgeon.

Like his two predecessors in the Hospital’s top professional post, he has his roots in Berks County. Bom in Fleetwood, December 23, 1881, the son of George and Catharine Schaeffer, he attended the schools of the community and in 1901 was graduated from the Keystone State Normal School, now the Teachers College. Three years later he completed his pre-medical training and received his bachelor's degree from Franklin and Marshall College. Both his Alma Mater and Muhlenberg College since have honored him with the honorary degrees of Doctor of Science.

In awarding him its mark of honor, Muhlenberg officially recognized Dr. Schaeffer as “a skillful surgeon; master teacher, and leader in the development of the Allentown Hospital; pioneer in industrial and public health services; recipient of the highest recognitions of merit in his profession; respected citizen, elder statesman, and counselor of the community.”

Although few men have had busier and more active professional careers, Dr. Schaeffer always has been willing to serve in the development of community enterprises and institutions. He is a Director and Vice-president of the Allentown National Bank, a Trustee of Cedar Crest College in Allentown and of the Theological Seminary of the Evangelical and Reformed Church in Lancaster, and the Chairman of the Health Division of the Council of Social Agencies. In that capacity he was active in establishing the Lehigh County Public Health Nursing Association and in laying the groundwork for a community health center. He served for several years as a Director and as Vice-president of the Allentown Chamber of Commerce and as Chairman of that organization’s Public Health Committee.

The change in rules, permitting qualified members of the medical profession not associated with the Staff more hospital privileges in caring for their private patients, had been advocated for more than a decade and frequently had been a point of contention between Board members themselves, and between the Board and various segments both of the medical profession and of the community. Until 1924, however, when the Hospital had been firmly established and its reputation securely entrenched, the rules insisted — as they do today in many of the nation’s top-ranking institutions — that final responsibility for the care of all patients be vested in the Physician and Surgeon-in-chief. Dr. Robert Schaeffer was largely instrumental in drafting the new rules, in reorganizing the Staff under them, and in putting them into operation.

They defined the Staff as the Chief of Staff, an Assistant Chief, and the heads of the various departments, then listed as medicine; surgery; obstetrics; eye, ear, nose, and throat; roentgenology; genitourinary; pathology; anaesthesia; dispensary; contagious diseases; and dentistry. Further, they specified that:

“The Staff shall have charge of the professional work of the Hospital. In each department there shall be one or more assistants who shall be appointed by the Board from the nominees made by the heads of the respective departments and approved by a majority of the Staff. Upon failure to so nominate and approve, the Board may act without such aid. Whenever a written application shall be made to the head of any department for the position of assistant thereon, the same shall be filed with the Secretary of the Board. The number of assistants in each department shall be determined by the Board after having received the recommendation of the Staff upon the suggestion of the head of the department. The duties of the assistants in each department shall be prescribed by the head thereof. Each member of the Staff shall render such free service as the Chief of Staff may reasonably require in furnishing proper care to patients in the Hospital and in aiding in the instruction of internes and pupil nurses.”

They assigned these duties to the Chief of Staff:

“The Chief of Staff shall have general supervision over the professional affairs of the Hospital. He shall preside at all meetings of the Staff and shall be a medium of communication between Staff and Board, reporting thereto all recommendations of the Staff in respect of the professional conduct of the Hospital. His presence at the meetings of the Board shall be solely for the purpose of giving information and advice. He shall supervise the professional conduct of the resident physicians and shall have the power of suspending any member of the Staff for due cause and pending action of the Board. In case of his absence or disability, the Assistant Chief of Staff shall act in his stead.”

Under the general supervisory powers vested in the Chief of Staff, each department head was assigned specific duties in his own sphere. For example, the rules read then and do today:

“The Surgical Chief shall have charge of and supervision of all the surgical work of the Hospital. He shall be responsible for the admission and discharge of all surgical patients in the wards and shall examine personally, or cause to be examined by his assistant or assistants, all surgical patients applying to the Hospital for admission; but this provision shall not apply to emergency cases. He shall be responsible for the professional conduct of his assistant or assistants, or may recommend to the Chief of Staff the discharge of any private patient in his department as unsuitable or on account of misbehaviour.”

Identical duties within their departments, were assigned to the Chief of Medicine, the Chief of the Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, the Genito-Urinary Chief, the Obstetrical Chief, the Chief of the Isolation Department. But there was this provision:

“The responsibility for the admission, discharge, and examination of patients imposed upon the Chiefs of certain departments by these Rules shall not exist in respect of or be extended to the private cases of other members of the Staff or by physicians or surgeons to whom the privileges of the Hospital shall have been extended.”

The Roentgenologist was given complete charge of all X-ray work and the Pathologist was assigned supervision of the laboratory. The Dispensary Chief, to whom supervision of the dispensary was entrusted, was placed in charge of all “minor accident cases brought to the Dispensary” and was required to answer the call of the resident on duty for that work.

Under Dr. Schaeffer’s leadership as Chief of Staff, the first Staff to operate under these rules was organized and officially placed in charge when it was elected on July 11, 1924. Dr. Schaeffer himself was named Chief of Surgery. Dr. Joseph M. Weaver, who had joined the Staff in 1907 as Pathologist, and who in the years immediately prior to the reorganization held the title of Physician, was elected Chief of the Medical Department and Assistant Chief of

Staff, positions he held until his death in 1934. Dr. Forrest G. Schaeffer was named Chief of the Obstetrical Department; Dr. William J. Hertz of the Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, with Dr. George F. Seiberling as Assistant Chief; Dr. Elmer H. Bausch, of the Genito-Urinary Department; Dr. Warren Butz, of the Dispensary; and Dr. J. Treichler Butz, of the Isolation Department. Dr. William C. Troxell continued as Roentgenologist and Dr. John Lear as Pathologist, a post he held until Dr. John J. Wenner was named to succeed him in 1925. A month later the first assistants were approved by the Board. Year after year as other specialties entered the picture, new departments were created and manned until today there are twenty-four with their chiefs and clinical chiefs.

In 1930 the Major Staff and the Auxiliary Staff were created and defined. The Major Staff, in charge of the professional work of the Hospital, includes the Chief of Staff, the Assistant Chief of Staff, and the heads and associates in each of the departments. Each member is required to render such free service “as the Chief of Staff may reasonably require in furnishing proper care for patients and in instructing nurses and internes.” The Auxiliary Staff consists of “physicians and surgeons in good professional standing and active practice who desire appointments but whose practice and place of abode prevent them from taking constant part in the professional work of the Hospital.” They also may be called upon by the Chief of Staff to render reasonable free service.

The Staff and various departmental units of it hold regular meetings and conferences and, since 1936, have been conducting seminars at least once each year.

Among the former department chiefs whose services added lustre to the record of the Hospital were: Dr. Louis C. LaBarre and the late Dr. John D. Matz, Chiefs of the Department of Gastro-enter-ology; the late Dr. Charles Muschlitz, Chief of Orthopedics; the late Dr. W. Frederick Herbst, who was Cardiologist and who followed Dr. Weaver as Medical Chief; Dr. Joseph T. Hummel, the first Dental Chief; Dr. Harry B. Kern, the first Chief of the Children’s Department, now Pediatrics; Dr. Bertram Beale, first Chief of Bronchoscopy; Dr. E. L. Clemens, first Chief of the Department of Neurology; Dr. William Fox, who was Chief Anaesthetist before he made proctology his specialty, and his predecessor, the late Dr. Mark Baush; and the late Dr. Fred Fetherolf, who was Chief of Fractures.

The contemporary Staff, as carefully selected as any during the past half-century, includes men and women who are thoroughly qualified in their respective fields, many of them through years of extensive graduate study and practice. Their training, and to some extent their experience, are cited in the roster* that follows.

Robert L. Schaeffer, M.D., Sc.D., F.A.C.S., Chief of Staff, Chief of the Surgical Department, and Associate in the Tumor Clinic Department

Certified by the American Board of Surgery; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and of the International College of Surgeons; Franklin and Marshall College, 1904; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1908; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1909; elected to Staff, 1910. Office, 30 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

Clyde H. Kelchner, M.D., F.A.C.P., Chief of the Medical Department and of the Rheumatic Heart Clinic

Certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine; Fellow of the American College of Physicians, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Academy International of Medicine and Dentistry; Associate Professor of Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania; Muhlenberg College, 1925; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1929; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1929; Resident, St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, 1930; graduate study, Harvard University, the University of Pennsylvania, Tulane University, the University of California; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to October 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1931; Visiting Physician, Abington Memorial Hospital. Office, 1125 Turner Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

Martin S. Kleckner, M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief of the Department of Proctology and of the Proctology Clinic

Certified by the American Board of Surgery and Proctology; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and of the International College of Surgeons; Chairman, Gastro-enterology and Proctology of the American Medical Association, 1946-47; President, American Proctologic Society, 1939-40; Muhlenberg College, 1910; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1914; graduate study, New York Post Graduate Hospital, Cornell University; Interne, Lankenau Hospital, Philadelphia, 1914-16; United States Army, 1916-19, Captain; elected to Staff, 1922; Consulting Staff, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, 202 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to proctology.

Kerwin M. Marcks, M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief of the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Associate in the Tumor Clinic and Chief of the Plastic Surgery Clinic

Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgeons; Fellow of

* Roster compiled as of February L 1949.

the American College of Surgeons and of the Academy International of Medicine; University of Virginia, 1926; Jefferson Medical College, 1930; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1931; graduate study, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, New York Post Graduate Hospital, Jefferson Medical College, and plastic surgery clinics in London, Paris, and Italy, and in St. Louis, Missouri; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1942 to September 1945, Lieutenant Colonel; elected to Staff, 1931; Plastic Surgeon, Sacred Heart Hospital; Consultant, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to plastic surgery.

Willard C. Masonheimer, M.D., Chief of the Department of Urology, Associate in the Tumor Clinic Department, and Chief of the Urology Clinic

Certified by the American Board of Urology; member, American Urological Society; Lafayette College, 1910; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1914; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1915; graduate study, New York Post Graduate School, 1925; elected to Staff, 1926; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1314 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to urology.

John R. Mench, M.D,. F.A.C.S., Chief of the Ear, Nose and Throat Department, of the Department of Bronchoscopy, and of the Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic

Certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology; Ohio State University, 1920; Jefferson Medical College, 1924; Interne, Youngstown Hospital, 1925; Resident, Bronx Eye and Ear Hospital, 1928-29; graduate study, New York Post Graduate School; United States Army, 1917-18, Private; elected to Staff, 1930. Office, 1306 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to otolaryngology and ophthalmology.

Samuel A. Phillips, M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief of the Department of Ophthalmology and of the Eye Clinic

Certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology; University of Pennsylvania, 1929; Long Island College of Medicine, 1933; Interne, Norristown Hospital, 1934; Resident, Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, 1934-36; elected to Staff, 1936. Office, 137 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to ophthalmology.

Gabriel Swartz, M.D., Chief of the Department of Neuro-psychiatry and of the Neuro-psychiatric Clinic

Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology; University of Pennsylvania, 1930; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1934; Interne, University of Pennsylvania

Hospital, 1936; Resident, Neurological Institute of New York,

1936-38; Fellow in Psychiatry, Hartford Retreat, Hartford^ Conn., 1938-40; elected to Staff, 1941; Associate in Neurology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; Staff of Delaware County Hospital, Drexel Hill. Offices, 255 South Seventeenth Street, Philadelphia, and 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to neurology and psychiatry.

Clifford H. Trexler, M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief of the Dispensary Staff, Associate in the Department of Surgery, and Chief of the Surgical Clinic

Certified by the American Board of Surgery; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and of the Academy International of Medicine; Muhlenberg College, 1922; Jefferson Medical College, 1926; Interne, Hospital of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 1928; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to January 1946, Lieutenant Colonel; elected to Staff, 1928. Office, 349 North Seventh Street, Allentown; practice limited to surgery.

William C. Troxell, M.D., F.A.C.R., Chief of the X-ray Department and Associate in the Tumor Clinic Department

Certified by the American Board of Radiology; Fellow of the American College of Radiology; Keystone State Normal School; Philadelphia College of Pharmacy; Medico Chirurgical College, 1908; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine; elected to Staff, 1917. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to radiology.

John J. Wenner, M.A., Ph.D., M.D., F.C.A.P., Chief of the Department of Pathology and Chief of the Tumor Clinic Department Certified by the American Board of Clinical Pathology and by the American Board of Anatomical Pathology; Fellow of the College of American Pathology; Muhlenberg College, 1913; M.A., Yale University, 1915; Ph.D., Yale University, 1918; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1925; Interne, Bryn Mawr Hospital, 1926; elected to Staff, 1926. Office, 44 North Thirteenth Street; practice limited to pathology.

William B. Barr, M.D., Chief of the Gastro-intestinal Department and of the Gastro-intestinal Clinic *

. Fellow, National Gastro-enterological Association; Temple University, 1922; Jefferson Medical College, 1926; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1927; Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1928; graduate study, Jefferson Medical College; elected to Staff, 1928. Office, 733 Turner Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

Elmer H. Bausch, M.D., Chief of the Syphilology Department Muhlenberg College, 1914; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1919; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1920; elected to

Charles D. Schaeffer, M.D., F.A.C.S. Surgeon-in-Chief 1900 to 1923

Department Chiefs 1949

Front: Willard C. Masonheimer, M.D., Urology; William J. Hertz, M.D., Ophthalmology Consultant; Robert L. Schaeffer, M.D., Chief Surgeon and Chief of Staff; William C. Troxell, M.D., Roentgenology; Kerwin M. Marcks, M.D.* Plastic Surgery; John J. Wenner, M.D., Pathology.

Middle: John R. Mench, M.D., Ear, Nqse and Throat; Clyde H. Kelchner, M.D., Medicine; William B. Barr, M.D., Gastro-Intestinal; Ruth N. Brown, M.D., Anaesthesia; Robert J. Turnbach, M.D., Cardiology; Elmer H. Bausch, M.D., Syphilology; Harold M. Covert, D.D.S., Oral Surgery.

Back'. Kenneth R. Weston, M.D., Orthopedics; Clifford H. Trexler, M.D., Out-patient Department; Fred G. Klotz, M.D., Gynecology; Joseph D. Rutherford, M.D., Dermatology; Alexander M. Peters, M.D., Pediatrics; Samuel A. Phillips, M.D., Ophthalmology; Thomas H. Weaber, Sr., M.D., Contagious Diseases; Ralph H. Henry, M.D., Physio-Therapy.

Missing from the group are: Martin S. Kleckner, M.D., Proctology; Gabriel Swartz, M.D., Neuro-Psychiatry; John J. Bernhard, M.D., Obstetrics; William H. Schaeffer,

D.D.S., Dental Department.

Staff, 1920; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 252 North Seventh Street, Allentown.

John J. Bernhard, M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief of the Obstetrical Department

Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; University of Buffalo; University of Buffalo Medical School, 1925; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1925; Resident, Elizabeth Steel Magee Hospital, 1926-28; graduate study, the University of Pittsburgh; United States Navy Medical Corps, July 1942 to January 1946, Commander; elected to Staff, 1928; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 33 North Seventeenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to obstetrics and gynecology.

Ruth N. Brown, M.D., Chief of Ancesthesia Department

Syracuse University, 1920; Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1924; Interne, West Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1924-25; elected to Staff, 1943; practice limited to anaesthesiology.

Harold M. Covert, D.D.S., Chief of the Department of Oral Surgery and Associate in the Dental Department

Westminster College, 1915; University of Pittsburgh School of Dentistry, 1918; graduate study, Mayo Clinic and under Dr. George Winters in St. Louis, Missouri; Pierre Fauchard Fellowship; United States Army Dental Corps, 1916 to 1918, Private; elected to Staff, 1943; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to oral surgery.

Ralph H. Henry, M.D., Chief of the Physio-tlierapy Department Pennsylvania State College, 1921; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1924; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1925; graduate study, New York Post Graduate Hospital and University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine; elected to Staff, 1945; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 102 North Tenth Street, Allentown.

Fred G. Klotz, M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief of the Department of Gynecology

Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; Princeton University, 1907; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1911; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1912; graduate study, Crile and Mayo Clinics; elected to Staff, 1924. Office, 126 North Ninth Street, Allentown.

Alexander M. Peters, M.D., Chief of the Department of Pediatrics and of the Allergy Clinic

Bucknell University, 1920; Jefferson Medical College, 1924; Interne, Methodist Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia, 1925; graduate study, Jefferson Hospital, Philadelphia; United States Army,

1917, Private; elected to Staff, 1926; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff;

Allergy Out-patient Department of Jefferson Hospital, Philadelphia. Office, 45 North Eleventh Street, Allentown; practice limited to pediatrics and allergies.

Joseph D. Rutherford, M.D., Chief of the Department of Dermatology and of the Dermatology Clinic

Lebanon Valley College, 1917; Temple University School of Medicine, 1923; Interne, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, 1924; graduate study, Skin and Cancer Hospital, Philadelphia; elected to Staff, 1924. Office, 112 North Thirteenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to dermatology.

William H. Schaeffer, Sr., D.D.S., Chief of the Dental Department and of the Dental Clinic

University of Pennsylvania School of Dentistry, 1907; elected to Staff, 1912. Office, 217 North Seventh Street, Allentown.

Robert J. Turnbach, M.D., Chief of the Department of Cardiology and of the Cardiology Clinic

Villanova College, 1929; Temple University School of Medicine, 1937; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1938; Medical Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1939; United States Navy Medical Corps, December 1942 to January 1946, Lieutenant Commander; elected to Staff, 1940. Office, 1443 Linden Street, Allentown; practice limited to cardiology.

Thomas H. Weaber, Sr., M.D., Chief of the Department of Contagious Diseases

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1905; Interne, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, 1906; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; elected to Staff, 1923. Office, 211 North Eighth Street, Allentown.

Kenneth R. Weston, M.D,. Chief of the Orthopedic Department and of the Orthopedic Clinic

Pennsylvania State College, 1927; Hahnemann Medical College, 1931; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1932; graduate study and residencies, Hahnemann Hospital, Hahnemann Medical College, United States Naval Hospital in Philadelphia, Jefferson Medical College; United States Navy Medical Corps, August 1940 to June

1946, Commander, Bronze Star; elected to Staff, 1932; Orthopedic Consultant, Allentown State Hospital and Grandview Hospital, Sellersville; Orthopedic Staff, Hahnemann Medical College; Sacred Heart Hospital. Office, 1304 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to orthopedics.

Douglass A. Decker, M.D., M.S., F.A.A.D.S., Associate in the Dermatology Department

Certified by the American Board of Dermatology and Syphilology; Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology and

Syphilology; Gettysburg College, 1926; University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 1930; Interne, Western Pennsylvania Hospital, 1931; Resident, Bellevue Hospital, New York, 1937-38; M.S. in Med., University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine, 1939; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1942 to June 1946, Lieutenant Colonel; elected to Staff, 1938. Office, 1648 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to dermatology.

William F. Fox, M.D., F.I.C.A., Associate in the Department of Proctology

Fellow of the International College of Anaesthetists; Muhlenberg College; Jefferson Medical College, 1927; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1928; graduate study, New York Polyclinic Hospital, New York Post Graduate Medical School; elected to Staff, 1929; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Charles P. Goldsmith, M.D., Associate in the Department of Ophthalmology

Muhlenberg College, 1936; Temple University School of Medicine, 1940; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1941; Resident, Bellevue Hospital, New York; graduate study, New York Graduate School of Medicine; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1941 to January 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1948. Office, 1648 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to ophthalmology.

Harry S. Good, M.D., F.A.C.S., Associate in the Surgical Department and on the Dispensary Staff

Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; Muhlenberg College, 1928; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1934; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1935; Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1935-36; graduate study, Cook County Graduate School of Medicine, Chicago; United States Navy Medical Corps, October

1941 to November 1945, Commander; elected to Staff, 1936. Office, 1248 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

Henry E. Guth, M.D., F.A.C.S., Associate in the Surgical Department and in the Department of Gynecology; Chief of the Gynecology Clinic

Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; Ursinus College; Temple University School of Medicine, 1917; Interne, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, 1918; House Surgeon, St. Luke’s Hospital, 1919-20; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Graduate Medical School, 1925; New York Post Graduate Medical School, 1926; University of Vienna, 1928; elected to Staff, 1923; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and St. Luke’s

Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, 2204 Main Boulevard, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

Charles S. Hertz, M.D., M.S. in Surg., F.A.C.S., Associate in the Surgical Department

Certified by the American Board of Surgery; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; Princeton University, 1930; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1934; Interne, University of Pennsylvania Hospital, 1934-36; Chief Surgical Resident, St. Mary’s Hospital, Mayo Clinic, 1939-40; Fellow in Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 1936-40; M.S. in Surgery, University of Minnesota, 1939; United States Army Medical Corps, May 1942 to June 1946, Lieutenant Colonel, Army Commendation Ribbon; elected to Staff, 1940; member of Surgical Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and Community Hospital, Quakertown. Office, 102 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

William J. Hertz, M.D., F.A.C.S., Consulting Ophthalmologist and Associate in the Ear, Nose, and Throat Department

Certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; Fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology; Medico-Chirurgical College, 1898; Interne, Robert Packer Hospital, Sayre, 1898-99; graduate study, Philadelphia Polyclinic Hospital, 1908; University of Vienna, 1925-26, 1930; Chief of Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, 1916 to 1945. Office, 125 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to ophthalmology and otolaryngology.

Guy L. Kratzer, M.D., M.S., Associate in the Department of Proctology

Muhlenberg College, 1931; Temple University School of Medicine, 1935; Interne, Harrisburg General Hospital, 1936; graduate study, Mayo Clinic; M.S. in Proctology, the University of Minnesota; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1447 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to proctology.

C. Merrill Leister, M.D., Associate in the Department of Pediatrics Lehigh University, 1928; Harvard University School of Medicine, 1932; Interne, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh; Residencies, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, and Children’s Hospital, Boston; elected to Staff, 1936; Senior Pediatric Staff, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, 1731 West Broad Street, Bethlehem; practice limited to pediatrics.

Arthur Lindenfeld, M.D., Associate in the Department of Neuro-logy

Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry; University of Pennsylvania, 1926; Hahnemann Medical College, 1930; Interne,

St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, and Children’s Hospital, Philadelphia; Clinical Director, Allentown State Hospital, 1931-46; graduate study, Graduate Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia University; elected to Staff, 1946; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, 1119 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to psychiatry.

Harry G. Miller, M.D., F.A.C.S., Associate in the Surgical Department and on the Dispensary Staff

Certified by the American Board of Surgery; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; Lehigh University, 1931; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1935; Interne, Philadelphia General Hospital, 1937; Resident, Detroit Receiving Hospital, 1938-41; graduate study, Wayne University, Detroit; United States Army Medical Corps, June 1942 to February 1946, Lieutenant Colonel; elected to Staff, 1946; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and University of Pennsylvania Hospital Out-patient Department. Office, 1119 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

Robert R. Muschlitz, M.D., Associate in the Department of Ophthalmology

Certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology; Princeton University, 1933; Jefferson Medical College, 1937; Interne, Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton, 1938; Resident, West Side Hospital, Scranton, 1939; graduate study, Chicago Ear, Eye, Nose, and Throat Hospital, George Washington University, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York Polyclinic Hospital; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1942 to January 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1939; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to ophthalmology and otolaryngology.

Joseph H. Reno, M.D., Associate in the Orthopedic Department Certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery; Temple University; Temple University School of Medicine, 1941; Interne, Chester Hospital, 1942; Residencies, Scottish Rite Hospital for Crippled Children, Dallas, Texas, 1943-45, and Robert Packer Hospital and Guthrie Clinic, Sayre, 1944; elected to Staff, 1947; Staff of St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, 26 North Twelfth Street, Allentown; practice limited to orthopedic surgery.

Marvin K. Rothenberger, M.D., Associate in the Ear, Nose, and Throat Department

Certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology; Pennsylvania State College; Jefferson Medical School, 1924; Interne, Methodist Hospital, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Post Graduate Hospital; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Post Graduate School of Medicine; United States Army,

1918, Private; elected to Staff, 1927; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 206 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to ophthalmology and otolaryngology.

Robert R. Shoemaker, M.D., M.Sc., F.A.C.S., Associate in the Department of Ophthalmology

Certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; Pennsylvania State College, 1931; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1934; Interne, Methodist Hospital, Philadelphia, 1935; Resident Surgeon, Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, 1942-44; graduate study, Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, M.Sc., 1941; United States Navy Medical Corps, 1944-1946, Lieutenant; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1248 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to ophthalmology.

Stewart M. Uhler, M.D., F.A.C.S., Associate in the Ear, Nose, and Throat Department

Certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; Lafayette College, 1903; Jefferson Medical College, 1906; Interne, Easton Hospital, 1907; graduate study, New York University, University of Berlin; elected to Staff, 1923; Sacred Heart and Quakertown Community Hospital Staffs. Office, 104 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to ophthalmology and otolaryngology.

Takeo Yamashita, M.D., F.A.C.S., Associate in the Surgical Department

Certified by the American Board of Surgery; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; University of Hawaii, 1927; Washington University School of Medicine, 1931; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1932; Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1940-42; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine; elected to Staff, 1935. Office, 25 South Tenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

John H. Abbott, M.D., Associate in the Department of Neurology Lehigh University, 1935; Hahnemann Medical College, 1940; Interne, Hahnemann Hospital, 1940; Resident, Philadelphia Hospital for Contagious Diseases, Allentown State Hospital; elected to Staff, 1946. Office, 44 North Twelfth Street, Allentown.

Rowland W. Bachman, M.D., Associate in the Surgical Department Fellow of the International College of Surgeons; University of Pennsylvania; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1919; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1920; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Post Graduate School of Medicine, 1932-33; elected to Staff, 1920; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 301 North Second Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

Harry S. Beitel, D.D.S., Associate in the Dental Department Lafayette College; Temple University School of Dentistry, 1935; Dental Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1936; United States Navy Dental Corps, October 1942 to February 1946, Lieutenant Commander; elected to Staff, 1936. Office, 141 North Ninth Street, Allentown; practice limited to general dentistry.

Frank R. Boyer, M.D., Associate in the Medical Department and

Associate Chief of the Medical Clinic

Muhlenberg College, 1938; Temple University School of Medicine, 1942; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1943; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1943 to July 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1943. Office, 16 North Second Street, Allentown.

George S. Boyer, M.D., Associate in the Surgical Department Muhlenberg College, 1937; Temple University School of Medicine, 1941; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1942; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Post Graduate School of Medicine,

1945-46; Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1946-48; United States Army Air Force Medical Corps, August 1942 to November 1945, Captain; elected to Staff, 1948. Office, 740 North Nineteenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

John D. Carapella, M.D., Associate Chief of the Medical Clinic Muhlenberg College, 1934; Jefferson Medical College, 1941; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1942; Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1942-43; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1944 to October 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1947; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 34 North Thirteenth Street, Allentown.

Leo T. Chylack, M.D., Associate in the Ear, Nose, and Throat

Department

Pennsylvania State College, 1927; Jefferson Medical College, 1930; Interne, Sacred Heart Hospital, 1931; Resident in ophthalmology, Bellevue Hospital, New York City, 1931-33; elected to Staff, 1933; Staffs of Sacred Heart and Quakertown Community Hospitals. Office, 104 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to ophthalmology and otolaryngology.

Robert H. Dilcher, M.D., Associate in the Department of Urology Muhlenberg College, 1934; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1938; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1939; Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1939-40, 1946-48; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine, 1945; United States Army Medical Corps, January 1941 to December 1945, Captain; elected to Staff, 1939; Staffs of Sacred Heart, Quakertown, and Sellersville Hospitals. Office, 1648 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to urology.

Lyster M. Gearhart, M.D., Associate in the Obstetrical Department Ohio State University, 1932; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1936; Interne, Wilkes Barre General Hospital, 1937; Residencies, Burlington County Hospital, Mount Holly, N. J.,

1937-38, Kensington Hospital for Women, 1938-39; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to January 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1939; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1540 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Edward L Geller, M.D., Associate in the Orthopedic Department LaSalle College; Hahnemann Medical College, 1934; Interne, Women’s Homeopathic Hospital, Philadelphia, 1935, Chief Resident, 1937-40; Resident, Roxborough Memorial Hospital, 1935; United States Army Medical Corps, 1935-36, First Lieutenant; elected to Staff, 1941. Office, Danielsville.

Karl T. Groner, D.D.S., Associate in the Department of Oral Surgery

Franklin and Marshall College; Atlanta Southern Dental College, 1934; Interne, Kings County Hospital, Brooklyn, 1937; graduate study, Kings County Hospital; United States Army Air Force Dental Corps, May 1943 to July 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1940; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1248 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to oral surgery.

Frederick M. Haas, M.D., Associate in the Obstetrical Department Kutztown State Teachers College, 1917; Hahnemann College of Science, 1921; Hahnemann Medical College, 1925; Interne, Woman’s Homeopathic Hospital, Philadelphia, 1926; graduate study, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 1940, New York Polyclinic Post Graduate School, 1945; United States Army, September 1917 to June 1919, Sergeant; elected to Staff, 1926; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1201 Turner Street, Allentown.

Ralph F. Harwick, M.D., Associate in the Medical Department Muhlenberg College, 1930; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1934; Interne and Resident, Abington Memorial Hospital, 1934-46; graduate study, New York Post Graduate Medical School, Columbia University; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1942 to February 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1936; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 102 North Thirteenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine and endocrinology.

Frederick G. Helwig, M.D., Associate in the Medical Department,

Associate on the Dispensary Staff, and Chief of the Diabetic Clinic Franklin and Marshall College, 1932; George Washington University School of Medicine, 1936; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1937; United States Army Medical Corps, February 1941 to January 1945, Captain; elected to Staff, 1937. Office, 28 North

Fifteenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

John H. Hennemuth, M.D., Associate in the Orthopedic DepartJ

ment

University of North Dakota; Jefferson Medical College, 1922; Interne, Pottsville General Hospital, 1923; United States Army Medical Corps, 1914 to 1918, 1942 to 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1928. Office, 32 North Third Street, Emmaus.

Newton E. Hess, D.D.S., Associate in the Dental Department Susquehanna University; Temple University School of Dentistry, 1940; Interne, Forsythe Dental Infirmary, 1941; Residencies, Southwestern State Hospital, Marion, Va., Eastern State Hospital, Williamsburg, Va.; United States Army Dental Corps, January 1943 to May 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1948. Office, 1303 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to pedodontia.

Clarence A. Holland, M.D., M.S., Associate in the Surgical Department

Muhlenberg College, 1936; Temple University School of Medicine, 1940; Interne and Resident, Temple University Hospital, 1940-46; graduate study, Temple University, M.S. in Surgery; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1016 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

Mitchell E. Katz, M.D., Associate in the Pediatrics Department University of Pennsylvania; Temple University School of Medicine, 1931; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1932; Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1933; graduate study, New York Post Graduate Medical School; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1942 to January 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1932; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, 650 Turner State, Allentown.

Jacob L. Levy, M.D., Associate in the Department of Urology Muhlenberg College, 1924; Jefferson Medical College, 1928; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1929; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1942 to March 1946, Major; elected to Staff,

1929. Office, 44 South Tenth Street, Allentown.

J. Kenneth Miller, D.D.S., Associate in the Dental Department Muhlenberg College; Temple University School of Dentistry, 1938; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1939; United States Navy Dental Corps, October 1942 to November 1945, Captain; elected to Staff, 1939. Office, 27 North Fifteenth Street, Allentown.

Maurice W. Miller, M.D., Associate in the Surgical Department Franklin and Marshall College, 1916; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1925; Interne, Geisinger Memorial Hospital, 1926; Resident, Palmerton Hospital, 1926-30; elected to Staff,

1930. Office, 1451 Chew Street, Allentown.

Roger J. Minner, M.D., Associate in the Gastro-intestinal Department

Muhlenberg College, 1933; Jefferson Medical College, 1937; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1938; graduate study, Harvard University School of Medicine; United States Army Medical Corps, December 1942 to June 1944; elected to Staff, 1938; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 143 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

Forrest G. Moyer, M.D., Associate in the Pediatric Department and

Chief of the Pediatric Clinic

Muhlenberg College, 1935; Temple University School of Medicine, 1940; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1941; Resident, St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, 1946, and Children’s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 1947; United States Army Air Force Medical Corps, July 1941 to January 1946, Major, Air Medal; elected to Staff, 1948; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 227 North Seventeenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to pediatrics.

Carl K. Newhart, D.D.S., Associate in the Dental Department Muhlenberg College; University of Pennsylvania School of Dentistry, 1945; United States Navy Dental Corps, July 1945 to July

1947, Lieutenant, junior grade; elected to Staff, 1947; Haff Hospital Staff. Office, 636 South Fifth Street, Fullerton.

Morgan D. Person, M.D., Associate in the Medical Department Franklin and Marshall College, 1930; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1935; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1936; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine; elected to Staff, 1936; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1336 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Paul W. Ramer, M.D., Associate in the Department of Syphilology

and Chief of the Venereal Disease Clinic

Muhlenberg College, 1922; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1926; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1927; elected to Staff, 1927. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to syphilology.

Donald Z. Rhoads, M.D., Associate in the Obstetrical Department Muhlenberg College, 1931; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1935; Interne, University of Pennsylvania Hospital, 1935-37; Resident, University of Pennsylvania Hospital, 1938, Woman’s Hospital in the State of New York, 1939-41; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to April 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1942; Auxiliary Staff, Sacred Heart Hospital.

Office, 229 North Seventeenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to obstetrics and gynecology.

Charles K. Rose, Jr., M.D., Associate in the Medical Department Fellow of the American Academy of General Practice; University of Pennsylvania, 1925; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1928; Interne, Staten Island General Hospital, 1929 and United States Public Health Service Hospital, Stapleton, New York; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine, University of Buffalo; elected to Staff, 1929; Staffs of St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, and Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown. Office, 2115 Hanover Avenue, Allentown.

William H. Schaeffer, Jr., D.D.S., Associate in the Dental Department

Franklin and Marshall College, 1940; University of Pennsylvania School of Dentistry, 1943; Dental Interne, Graduate Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 1944; elected to Staff, 1945. Office, 217 North Seventh Street, Allentown.

Frances C. Schaeffer, M.D., Associate in the Obstetrical Department and Chief of the Pre-natal and Post-natal Clinic

Bryn Mawr College, 1938; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1942; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1942; Resident, Woman’s Hospital of the State of New York, 1944-46; elected to Staff, 1946; Consulting Staff, Grandview Hospital, Sellersville. Office, 26 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to obstetrics and gynecology.

Charles P. Sell, M.D., Associate in the Medical Department

Muhlenberg College; Hahnemann Medical College, 1936; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1937; graduate study, New York Post Graduate Medical School, University of Michigan; elected to Staff, 1937; Auxiliary Staff, Sacred Heart Hospital. Office, 1827 Tilghman Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

Morton I. Silverman, M.D., Associate in the Medical Department and Associate in the Department of Neurology

Muhlenberg College, 1934; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1938; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1939; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to February 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital and University of Pennsylvania Hospital Staffs. Office, 1323 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Lloyd A. Stahl, M.D., Associate in the Medical Department Susquehanna University; Jefferson Medical College, 1932; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1933; Resident, Allentown Hospital,

1933-34; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Hospital, New York Post Graduate Medical School, University of Michigan; elected to Staff, 1934; Sacred Heart Hospital Associate Staff. Office, 101 North Thirteenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

William M. Stauffer, M.D., Associate in the Dermatology Department

Bluffton College; University of Chicago, 1920; University of Chicago Rush Medical School, 1930; Interne, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 1930, Allentown Hospital, 1931; elected to Staff, 1932; Sacred Heart Hospital Auxiliary Staff; United States Army,

1919, Private. Office, 335 North Eighth Street, Allentown.

Wayne G. Stump, M.D., Associate in the Surgical Department Muhlenberg College, 1918; Jefferson Medical College, 1929; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1930; elected to Staff, 1930. Office, 518 North Ninth Street, Allentown.

Richard S. Troxel, M.D., Associate on the Dispensary Staff

Pennsylvania State College, 1936; Temple University School of Medicine, 1940; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1941; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1941 to April 1946, Lieutenant Colonel; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Auxiliary Staff. Office, 46 South Thirteenth Street, Allentown.

Pauline K. Wenner, M.D., Associate in the Pathology Department Bucknell University, 1932; Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1937; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1938; United States Navy Medical Corps, November 1942 to January 1946, Lieutenant; elected to Staff, 1938; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 44 North Thirteenth Street, Allentown.

Byron D. Wilkins, M.D., Associate in the Proctology Department Hahnemann College, 1929; Hahnemann Medical College, 1933; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1934; graduate study, Harvard University Graduate School of Medicine, Temple University Hospital, Hahnemann Hospital; United States Navy Medical Corps, December 1942 to January 1946, Lieutenant Commander; elected to Staff, 1934; Staffs of Sacred Heart and Quakertown Community Hospitals. Office, 349 North Seventh Street, Allentown; practice limited to proctology.

Carlin O. Williams, M.D., Associate in the Medical Department Pennsylvania State College; Temple University School of Medicine, 1935; Interne and Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1935-37; elected to Staff, 1936. Office, 1337 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Anna Ziegler, M.D., Associate in the Obstetrical Department Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1921; Teachers College of Columbia University, B.S. in Nursing Education, 1926; New York University Medical School, 1933; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1933-34; graduate study and residencies, Women’s Medical College, Philadelphia, and Women’s Hospital, Philadelphia,

1946-49; elected to Staff, 1934. On leave, 1946-49.

AUXILIARY STAFF

Dill H. Albright, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1933; Temple University School of Medicine, 1939; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1940; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1942 to March 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1940. Office, Orefield.

Harry L. Baker, M.D.

Franklin and Marshall College, 1906; Hahnemann Medical College, 1910; Interne, Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1910-11; graduate study, Army Medical School; United States Army Medical Corps, January 1918 to July 1919, Captain; Lehigh County Medical Director; elected to Staff, 1928. Office, 302 Walnut Street, Catasauqua.

Walter A. Banks, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1930; Temple University School of Medicine, 1934; Interne and Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1934-36; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to May 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1936. Office, Main and Church Streets, Macungie.

Edgar S. Baum, M.D.

University of Pennsylvania, 1938; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1942; Interne, Sacred Heart Hospital, 1943; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1943 to July 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1624 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Frederick R. Bausch, Jr., M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1931; Hahnemann Medical College, 1935; Interne, Sacred Heart Hospital, 1936; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1942 to April 1946, Major, Bronze Star; elected to Staff, 1936; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 142 North Ninth Street, Allentown.

Richard D. Bausch, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1938; Jefferson Medical College, 1942; Interne, Philadelphia General Hospital, 1943; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1943 to March 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital and Philadelphia General Hospital Staffs. Office, 109 North Second Street, Allentown.

Faith Frances Baver, M.D.

Boston University, 1929; Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1933; Interne, New England Hospital, Boston, 1934; graduate study, Philadelphia General Hospital, 1946-47; elected to Staff, 1936; Staff of Grandview Hospital, Sellersville. Office, Front and Dotts Streets, Pennsburg.

George A. Baver, M.D.

Franklin and Marshall College, 1928; Jefferson Medical College, 1932; Interne, Methodist Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia, 1933; Resident, Somerset Hospital, Somerville, N. J., 1933-34; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1942 to January 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1936; Staff of Grandview Hospital, Sellersville. Office, Pennsburg.

Foster A. Beck, M.D.

University of Maryland School of Medicine, 1916; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1917; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1917 to August 1919, Captain; elected to Staff, 1917. Office, 402 Hanover Avenue, Allentown.

Joseph Bierman, M.D.

New York University, 1926; Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1929; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1930; Residencies, Allentown Hospital, 1930; Morrisania City Hospital, New York, 1937; State Cancer Institute, Buffalo, 1941; Cincinnati General Hospital, 1943; graduate study, New York University, 1936-38, and Harvard University School of Public Health, 1939; elected to Staff, 1931; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1028 Chew Street, Allentown.

George Brong, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1935; Hahnemann Medical College, 1939; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1940; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to October 1945, Captain, Bronze Star; elected to Staff, 1940; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, Main Street, Bath.

Stanley A. Brunner, M.D.

Kutztown State Teachers College, 1902; Medico Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, 1909; Interne, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, 1911; elected to Staff, 1938; Reading Community General Hospital Staff. Office, Krumsville.

Laverne T. Burns, M.D.

University of Michigan, 1939; Temple University School of Medicine, 1943; Interne, Temple University Hospital, 1944; United States Army Medical Corps, February 1942 to August 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1324 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

E. Eugene Cleaver, M.D.

Franklin and Marshall College, 1934; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1938; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1939; United States Army Medical Corps, February 1941 to January 1946, Major, Silver Star; elected to Staff, 1939; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, Grandview Hospital, Sellersville, and Community Hospital, Quakertown. Office, 300 Main Street, East Greenville.

Harry L. Cunin, M.D.

Muhlenberg College; Temple University; Temple University School of Medicine, 1930; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1931; Resident, University of Pennsylvania Graduate Hospital, 1947, and Children’s Hospital, Philadelphia, 1947-48; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine; elected to Staff, 1931; Sacred Heart Hospital Otolaryngology Staff. Office, 1801 Walnut Street, Allentown; practice limited to otolaryngology.

Frank J. Dileo, M.D.

New York University, 1926; University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1930; Interne, Sacred Heart Hospital, 1931; elected to Staff, 1932; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 203 North Second Street, Allentown.

Frederick A. Dry, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1937; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1941; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1942; graduate study, University of Buffalo, 1948; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to December 1945, Captain, Bronze Star, Silver Star, Croix de Guerre with Palm; elected to Staff, 1942; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, 224 Main Street, Emmaus.

H. Edwin Eisenhard, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1922; Cincinnati Eclectic Medical College, 1927; Interne, Sacred Heart Hospital, 1928; elected to Staff, 1928; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 801 North Nineteenth Street, Allentown.

Warren H. Endres, M.D.

Juniata College; Jefferson Medical College, 1932; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1933; graduate study, Army School of Roentgenology; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1942 to November 1945, Major; elected to Staff, 1933. Office, Fogels-ville.

Harold E. Everett, M.D.

Muhlenberg College; Temple University School of Medicine, 1939; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1940; graduate study, New York Post Graduate School and the University of Pennsylvania Medical Clinics; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1942 to October 1945, Captain, Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster; elected to Staff, 1940; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and Haff Hospital, Northampton. Office, 1730 Lincoln Avenue, Northampton.

William J. Fetherolf, M.D.

Medico Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, 1906; United States Army Medical Corps, 1918, Lieutenant; elected to Staff, 1924; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, Steinsville.

Frederick D. Fister, M.D.

Lafayette College, 1932; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1936; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1937; graduate study, New York Post Graduate School; elected to Staff, 1937. Office, Trexlertown.

Thomas R. Fister, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1931; New York University School of Medicine, 1935; Interne, City Hospital, New York, 1936-37; United States Army Medical Corps, May 1941 to December 1945, Major; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 601 Hanover Avenue, Allentown.

R. Jean Fleckenstine, M.D.

Certified by the American Board of Pediatrics; University of Michigan, 1936; Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1940; Interne, Williamsport Hospital, 1941; Residencies, Babies Hospital of Philadelphia, 1942, and Babies’ and Children’s Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif., 1943; graduate study, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine, 1945-46; elected to Staff, 1947; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 2152 Chew Street, Allentown; practice limited to pediatrics.

Charles R. Fox, M.D.

Jefferson Medical College, 1918; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1919; United States Army Medical Corps Reserve, January 1918 to January 1919; elected to Staff, 1924. Office, 1919 Washington Avenue, Northampton.

Julius D. Friedman, M.D.

Protestant Evangelical College, Hungary, 1920; German University, Prague, Czecho-Slovakia, 1927; Interne, Hahnemann Hospital, Scranton, 1929; Resident, Farview State Hospital for Criminal Insane, 1929-31; graduate study, University of Buffalo, 1944; elected to Staff, 1945; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 802 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Cornelius A. Gallagher, M.D.

Villanova College, 1928; Temple University School of Medicine, 1932; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1933; United States Army, World War I, Private; elected to Staff, 1933; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 534 North Sixth Street, Allentown.

Aaron Grossman, M.D.

College of the City of New York, 1926; Columbia University, 1927; Tufts College Medical School, 1931; Interne, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, 1933; United States Army Medical Corps, May 1941 to November 1945, Lieutenant Colonel; elected to Staff, 1937; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1119 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

William W. Haines, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1928; Hahnemann Medical College, 1932; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1933; graduate study, University of Chicago, 1943; United States Army Medical Corps, October

1942 to April 1944, First Lieutenant; elected to Staff, 1933; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 731 Main Street, Slatington; internal medicine and clinical pathology.

Nathan H. Heiligman, M.D., F.C.C.P.

Bucknell University, 1929; Jefferson Medical College, 1933; Interne, Lincoln Hospital, New York, 1933-35; Resident, White Haven Sanatorium, 1935-36; Fellow, American College of Chest Physicians; elected to Staff, 1937; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 112 North Ninth Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine and diseases of the chest.

George W. Heintzelman, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1933; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1937; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1938; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to December 1945, Major, Bronze Star; elected to Staff, 1938; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, Neffs.

Carleton S. Herrick, M.D.

University of Maine; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1944; Interne, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn., 1945; Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1947; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1945 to February 1947, Captain; elected to Staff,

1948. Office, Wescosville.

David F. Hottenstein, M.D.

University of Virginia; Hahnemann Medical College, 1937; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1938; United States Navy Medical Corps, Lieutenant Commander; elected to Staff, 1938; Staffs of the Pottstown General Hospital, Pottstown Memorial Hospital, and Sacred Heart Hospital. Office, Bally.

Charles F. Johnson, M.D.

Lafayette College, 1934; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1938; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1939; elected to Staff, 1939; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 216 North Fourth Street, Emmaus.

Kermit K. Kistler, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1938; Hahnemann Medical College, 1943; Interne, United States Marine Hospital, Staten Island, 1944; Residencies, United States Public Health Service, Harlem Eye and Ear Hospital, New York; graduate study, Harlem Eye and Ear Hospital, Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital, George Washington University; United States Navy Medical Corps, March 1944 to February 1946, Lieutenant; elected to Staff, 1948; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and Harlem Eye and Ear Hospital, New York. Office, 1146 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to ophthalmology and otolaryngology.

William S. Kistler, M.D.

Juniata College, 1934; Jefferson Medical College, 1939; Interne, Jefferson Hospital, 1941; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1941 to November 1945, Lieutenant Colonel; elected to Staff, 1946; Staffs of Quakertown Hospital, Sellersville Hospital, and Jefferson Hospital. Office, 300 Main Street, East Greenville.

Luther H. Kline, M.D.

Lehigh University, 1921; Jefferson Medical College, 1926; Interne, Methodist Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia, 1927; elected to Staff, 1928; Staffs of Haff Hospital, Northampton, and Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown. Office, 129 Second Street, Cementon.

Fred C. Knappenberger, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1924; Jefferson Medical College, 1928; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1929; elected to Staff, 1929; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 215 American Street, Fullerton.

Charles C. Koniver, M.D.

Villanova College, 1935; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1939; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1940; elected to Staff, 1942; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1145 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Henry Kozloff, M.D.

University of Pennsylvania, 1936; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1940; Interne, Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to May 1946, Major, Bronze Star; elected to Staff, 1941; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 36 South Ninth Street, Allentown.

Albert E. Kratzer, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1932; Temple University School of Medicine, 1936; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1937; elected to Staff, 1937. Office, 559 Chestnut Street, Emmaus.

Asher G. Kriebel, M.D.

Jefferson Medical College, 1903; elected to Staff, 1930. Office, New Tripoli, Route 1.

Vera J. Krisukas, M.D.

Pennsylvania State College, 1941; Temple University School of Medicine, 1944; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1945; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Clarence L. Lehman, M.D.

Lebanon Valley College, 1989; Temple University School of Medicine, 1943; Interne, Harrisburg Hospital, 1944; United States Army Medical Corps, January 1944 to July 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1946; Staffs of St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, and Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown. Office, 111 South Walnut Street, Bath.

Lewis J. Leiby, M.D.

Franklin and Marshall College, 1929; Jefferson Medical College, 1933; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1934; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to April 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1934; Sacred Heart Hospital Auxiliary Staff. Office, 1108 Main Street, Slatington.

Robert E. Lentz, M.D.

University of Pennsylvania, 1937; Temple University School of Medicine, 1941; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1942; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1942 to March 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 2004 South Fifth Street, Allentown.

William F. Long, M.D.

Kutztown Normal School, 1896; Jefferson Medical College, 1902. Office, Mertztown, Route 1.

Wallace J. Lowright, Jr., M.D.

Franklin and Marshall, 1925; Temple University School of Medicine, 1929; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1930; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1942 to November 1945, Captain; elected to Staff, 1930; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital and Quakertown Community Hospital. Office, Center Valley.

Wallace J. Lowright, Sr., M.D.

Medico Chirurgical College, 1898; Interne, Hazleton State Hospital, 1899; elected to Staff, 1930; Quakertown Hospital Staff. Office, Center Valley.

Frederick H. Martin, M.D.

Moravian College, 1935; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1939; Interne, Protestant Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia, 1941; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1941 to April 1946, Major, Bronze Star; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 308 Main Street, Emmaus.

Herman F. Meckstroth, M.D.

Ursinus College, 1928; Jefferson Medical College, 1932; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1933; United States Army Medical Corps, April 1941 to January 1946, Major; elected to Staff, 1933; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 718 St. John Street, Allentown.

Ralph F. Merkle, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1915; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1920; Interne, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, 1921; Charter Member, American Diabetic Association; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, 219 North Seventh Street, Allentown.

Myles R. Miller, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1930; Western Reserve Medical College, 1934; Interne, University of Pittsburgh, 1935; United States Navy Medical Corps, October 1940 to December 1946, Commander, Bronze Star; elected to Staff, 1935; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 37 North Fifteenth Street, Allentown.

J. Edwin S. Minner, M.D.

Medico Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, 1910; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1911; elected to Staff, 1936; Haff Hospital Staff, Northampton. Office, 349 Main Street, Egypt.

James D. Moatz, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1939; Temple University School of Medicine, 1943; Interne, Temple University Hospital and Philadelphia Naval Hospital, 1944; United States Navy Medical Corps, September 1942 to August 1946, Commander; elected to Staff, 1946; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem. Office, 928 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Eugene H. Mohr, M.D.

Muhlenberg College; Temple University School of Medicine, 1926; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1927. Office, Main Street, Alburtis.

Joel Nass, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Certified by the American Board of Surgery; Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; University of Pennsylvania, 1928; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1931; Interne, Abington Memorial Hospital, 1932; Surgical Resident, Sacred Heart Hospital, 1933-36; United States Army Medical Corps, May 1942 to June 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1932; Surgical Staff, Sacred Heart Hospital. Office, 721 Walnut Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery and proctology.

Carl J. Newhart, M.D.

Muhlenberg College; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1919; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1920; elected to Staff, 1936. Office, 218 Pine Street, Catasauqua.

John R. Phillips, M.D.

Certified by the American Board of Pediatrics; Ohio Wesleyan University, 1929; University of Rochester School of Medicine, 1933; Interne, Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1934; Resident, University of Rochester Hospitals, 1934-36; elected to Staff, 1936. Office, 1120 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Ray W. Pickel, M.D.

Lebanon Valley College, 1932; Temple University School of Medicine, 1936; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1936; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to March 1946, Major, Bronze Star with two clusters, Knight of the Order of Orange, Nassau; elected to Staff, 1937; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 47 Cherry Street, Walnutport.

Sidney A. Quinn, M.D.

Mount St. Mary’s College, 1907; Jefferson Medical College, 1911; Interne, Jefferson Hospital, Philadelphia, 1912; Resident, Altoona City Hospital; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1918 to December 1918, First Lieutenant; elected to Staff, 1933; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 303 North Sixth Street, Allentown.

Hope T. M. Ritter, M.D.

Medico Chirurgical College, 1902; Interne, Medico Chirurgical Hospital, Philadelphia, 1903; elected to Staff, 1904; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 101 North Eleventh Street, Allentown.

John J. Sassaman, M.D.

Villanova College, 1930; Hahnemann Medical College, 1938; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1939; Resident, Allentown State Hospital, 1940; United States Navy Medical Corps, April 1940 to October 1945, Lieutenant Commander; elected to Staff, 1944; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital and Hahnemann Hospital. Office, 1412 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Oliver S. Schadt, Jr., M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1937; Jefferson Medical College, 1941; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1942; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to March 1946, Major, Purple Heart; elected to Staff, 1942; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 721 Turner Street, Allentown.

Glenn H. Schantz, M.D., M.Sc.

Pennsylvania State College, 1934; Temple University School of Medicine, 1939; Interne, Harrisburg Hospital, 1940; Resident, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, 1946-48; University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine, M.Sc., 1945-46; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to January 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1942; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 174 Main Street, Emmaus; surgical practice.

John J. Schneller, M.D.

Lafayette College, 1934; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1938; Interne, Sacred Heart Hospital, 1939; United States Army Medical Corps, February 1944 to May 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1939; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 119 Pine Street, Catasauqua.

Harvey W. Scholl, M.D.

Ursinus College, 1933; Jefferson Medical College, 1937; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1938; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1942 to February 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1938; Staffs of Grandview Hospital, Sellersville, and Community Hospital, Quakertown. Office, 224 Fourth Street, East Greenville.

Paul G. Shoemaker, M.D.

Fellow of the American Academy of General Practice; Lafayette College; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1918; Interne, Protestant Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia, 1919; United States Naval Reserve, December 1917 to March 1920, Lieutenant, junior grade; elected to Staff, 1930; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 114 North Ninth Street, Allentown.

John M. Siegel, M.D.

Certified by the American Board of Dermatology and Syphilolo-gy; Pennsylvania State College, 1934; Jefferson Medical College, 1938; Interne, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Philadelphia, 1939; Resident, Bellevue Hospital, New York, 1945-47; graduate study, New York University Post Graduate Medical School, 1947, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1947-48; United States Army Medical Corps, February 1941 to January 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1948; Dermatologist, Sacred Heart Hospital; Instructor, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology. Office, 1311 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to dermatology and syphilology.

Myrtle M. Siegfried, M.D. (Mrs. Michael Vigilante)

Albright College; George Washington University School of Medicine, 1937; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1938; graduate study, New York Polyclinic Hospital; elected to Staff, 1938; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1344 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Michael J. Skweir, M.D.

Fellow of the American Academy of General Practice; Hahnemann Medical College, 1928; Interne, Southside Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1929; United States Army Air Corps, April 1917 to May 1919, Sergeant; elected to Staff, 1929; Staffs of Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, and Haff Hospital, Northampton. Office, 1665 Washington Avenue, Northampton.

Charles F. Smith, M.D.

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1911; Interne, Roxborough Memorial Hospital, Philadelphia, 1912. Office, 51 East Center Avenue, Topton.

Warren L. Trexler, M.D.

Hahnemann College of Science, 1928; Hahnemann Medical College, 1932; Interne, Community General Hospital, Reading, 1933; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to February 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1933; Staffs of Reading hospitals. Office, 112 South Home Street, Topton.

William B. Trexler, M.D.

Keystone State Normal School; Medico-Chirurgical College, 1906; elected to Staff, 1931; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 823 Third Street, Fullerton.

Michael Vigilante, M.D.

Long Island University, 1933; Marquette University School of Medicine, 1937; Interne, Nassau County Hospital, New York, 1938; New York Polyclinic Hospital, 1938-40; Resident, New York Polyclinic Hospital, 1940-42; United States Army Medical Corps, 1942-1945, Major; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 1344 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Max B. Walkow, M.D.

University of Oklahoma; University of Cincinnati School of Medicine, 1924; Interne, Sacred Heart Hospital, 1925; New York Post Graduate School, Temple University Hospital and Cardiac Clinic; Instructor in Medicine and Cardiology, Temple University Hospital; elected to Staff, 1929; Staffs of the Sacred Heart Hospital and Temple University Hospital. Office, 139 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine and cardiology.

Thomas H. Weaber, Jr., M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 1936; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1940; Interne and Resident, Allentown Hospital, 1940-43; graduate study, Veterans Administration Hospital, Palo Alto, Calif., 1943; Internal Medicine, University of California, 1946; United States Army Medical Corps, April 1944 to September 1946, Captain; Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Director of Health Service, Muhlenberg College; elected to Staff, 1946; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 211 North Eighth Street, Allentown.

Aaron D. Weaver, M.D.

Keystone State Normal School, 1907; Medico Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, 1913; Interne, Allentown Hospital, 1914; graduate study, Columbia University School of Medicine, University of Buffalo, Mount Sinai Hospital, Philadelphia. Office, 110 East Main Street, Macungie.

Arthur C. Webber, M.D.

Susquehanna University, 1934; Temple University School of Medicine 1938; Interne, Reading Hospital, 1939; Resident, Grandview Hospital, Sellersville, 1940; United States Army

Medical Corps, November 1942 to December 1945, Captain; elected to Staff, 1940; Quakertown Community Hospital Staff. Office, Station Avenue, Coopersburg.

Woodrow W. Wendling, M.D.

Muhlenberg College, 19S7; Temple University School of Medicine, 1942; Interne, Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia, 1943; United States Army Medical Corps, June 1942 to November 1945, Captain; elected to Staff, 1946. Office, New Tripoli.

Frank R. Wentz, M.D.

Fellow of the American Academy of General Practice; Jefferson Medical College, 1913; Interne, Stetson Hospital, Philadelphia, 1914; elected to Staff, 1944; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 818 Turner Street, Allentown.

James Weres, M.D.

Lafayette College, 1928; Jefferson Medical College, 1932; Interne, Sacred Heart Hospital, 1933; Resident, Torrey General Hospital, Palm Springs, Calif., 1943-44; graduate study, New York Polyclinic Hospital; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1942 to January 1946, Captain; elected to Staff, 1948; Sacred Heart Hospital Staff. Office, 907 Chestnut Street, Coplay.

BEHIND THE OPEN DOORS

PROFESSIONAL care of the sick and the injured is one important responsibility of a hospital and of the community it serves. Maintenance of the hospital in which that care is given is another problem. The two, however, have not always been separate functions at the Allentown Hospital.

It is the responsibility of the professional staff, the physicians and surgeons and pathologists and roentgenologists, to diagnose the ailments of the individual patients under their care and to provide proper treatment. The nursing staff is charged with carrying out the orders of the professional staff and with helping patients attain maximum comfort. Keeping the plant in order, its linens clean, its larders stocked, its medicine cabinets filled, its accounts balanced, and its facilities ready for any emergency, twenty-four hours of every day, is the function of the administrative personnel, the official representative of the Board of Trustees in daily operations and the liaison between the Trustees and every department and activity of the institution.

During most of the Allentown Hospital’s first quarter-century, the separate functions and responsibilities were not always clearly defined. As a result, there was frequent overlapping, a situation that was not too serious when the Hospital was small and relatively compact, but that could be both embarrassing and costly in an institution that in 1948 cared for more patients in a single day than it admitted in any of the first three years of its history; that in any month of 1949 had a larger roster of employes and nurses than its patient roster in 1903, when 614 admissions were recorded.

The executive officer of the Hospital, when the institution opened its doors, was Annie B. Gibson, the Head Nurse. In addition to supervising the general care of patients and instructing four student nurses, she planned the daily menus, purchased the food, directed the five maintenance and domestic employes on the household staff, ordered drugs and supplies, kept medical records as directed by the physicians and surgeons, and collected the fees the Hospital charged those patients able to pay for their own care. Her successor, Clara V. Haring, had the same responsibilities when she began her duties at the Hospital and held the title of Matron and Superintendent.

“The general scheme for the conduct of the internal affairs of the Hospital, as outlined in our Constitution and in our last report, has been followed and found to work admirably,” President Singmaster told the Hospital Association in 1900. “The Executive Committee has exercised constant supervision. The Head Nurse has shown great aptitude for her exacting situation. The Medical and Surgical Staffs have continued to render skillful and faithful service free of charge.”

Both Miss Gibson and Miss Haring had the generous assistance and the able support of members of the Board of Trustees and Staff, particularly of Dr. Charles S. Martin, one of the leaders in the organization of the Hospital, a member of its first Board of Trustees and of the Building Committee, and an Assistant Physician on the Staff. As Secretary of the Board of Trustees from 1902 until his death in 1910, Dr. Martin was active in the early operations of the Hospital and was its purchasing agent and business manager for eight years prior to his death. His volunteer services in the development of the Hospital and his activities in the community are recorded in this minute which remains a part of the record of the Hospital:

“The Trustees of the Allentown Hospital Association have heard with profound regret of the sad and sudden death of their colleague and Secretary, Dr. Charles S. Martin. His vast information in the management of hospitals, gathered in the practice of his profession and in the hospitals of this country and Europe, made him almost indispensable in our institution. His clear judgment and untiring energy in grasping and classifying details made him influential in our meetings. Whatever he undertook, he carried to successful conclusions. Not alone in the Hospital was his influence potential. He was a factor in the civic life of our city. A member of the Fire Department, he was active to keep that Department up to the highest standard of usefulness for the protection of property. The beautiful park in the western part of our city was largely his design. Lately appointed Postmaster of this city, he was entering on his work to master all the details of that important office. The recommendations and endorsements for the appointment were signed by the best citizens and are a testimonial to

the worth and ability of the appointee.

“We shall miss him in our counsels and in the work at the Hospital. And when the contemplated wing is begun and erected, his ripe judgment will be missed, and his hand, now cold in death, will not aid us.

“As a physician, public-spirited citizen, active fireman, and most conspicuously in his unselfish work for our Hospital, he has gone to the great Beyond — he has forever crossed the bar, but he has left a name and a record of things well done for his native city that will remain an imperishable monument in the recollection of those who knew him.”

Dr. C. D. Schaeffer, as the first active Physician and Surgeon-in-chief, was regarded as the leader in the development of the Hospital and as an administrator through nearly all of its first quarter-cen-tury. He knew the problems and needs of the institution from his daily contact with it. From the very beginning, he was active in its management, working in close cooperation with the Board of Trustees, of which he was a member, and with those directly in charge of matters relating to finances and to maintenance. He assumed even more duties and specific responsibilities, fully described in the preceding chapter, when he was made the executive head of the Hospital in June 1914 under new regulations which established the position of Physician and Surgeon-in-chief and Director. Every detail of management, from purchases of supplies and provisions to the keeping of endowment fund records, became his responsibility, if not his specific duty. He was the Hospital’s physician and surgeon, its purchasing agent and bookkeeper, its financial agent and public relations director, its personnel director and payroll clerk, in fact and in deed, the director of both its professional services and its business activities. The regulations made him responsible only to the Board of Trustees.

It was at Dr. Schaeffer’s own suggestion that the Board changed the rules two years later and established a Board of Superintendents that included the Physician and Surgeon-in-chief and Director, the Directress of Nurses, and a member of the Board of Trustees. The Board member was named for a term of six months and the position rotated among those members able to devote considerable time to the problems of management. The Board of Superintendents were officially designated as the managers of the Hospital. Their recourse, in case of disagreement, was to the Board of Trustees. The Superintendents established a bookkeeping system in the Hospital, engaged a financial secretary, made purchases through an order system that included competitive bids, and recommended improvements in facilities and procedures to the Trustees. The Board of Managers remained in charge, technically at least, until the rules adopted in June 1924, as the Hospital began its second quarter-century, opened the Staff to more physicians and surgeons, defined departments and administrative functions, and created the position of Manager, a title later changed to Superintendent. Oscar L. Schwartz was elected Manager even before the new rules were formally ratified by the Hospital Association and served from February 1, 1924 until the early summer of that year.

The rules, substantially the same through the second twenty-five years of the Hospital’s service, placed “the office” under the direction of the Manager and charged him with recording all patients admitted and discharged, with collecting from them the payments due to the Hospital, with keeping records of the income and expenses of each department, and with supervising all admissions and the assignment of patients to wards, semi-private sections, or private rooms. Housekeeping was made the specific responsibility of the Dietitian, an appointment first made in 1912, and that position was placed under the joint supervision of the Manager and the Directress of Nurses. Through the years, the Superintendent was constantly assigned new duties, including the ultimate authority for all purchases that are within the maintenance budget adopted by the Board of Trustees, the active management of the endowment fund investments under the supervision of the Treasurer and the Finance Committee of the Board of Trustees, the collection of all accounts, the establishment of credit for patients, the investigation of the financial status of those who claim they are unable to pay for their care, and the general oversight of all business affairs of the institution that in its golden anniversary year will spend approximately $1,250,000 for its normal day-to-day operations. The Superintendent is the chief administrative officer of the Hospital, a representative of the Board of Trustees authorized by it to interpret and put into effect the policies it adopts. He reports at least once each month to the Board and as frequently as may be necessary to the Executive Committee or to other committees that charge him with special assignments. The Superintendent, the Chief of Staff, and the Directress of Nurses confer almost daily on problems of maintenance and development and make their recommendations, individually or collectively, to the Trustees.

First manager and superintendent to serve under these rules was Ceorge W. Sherer, who began his duties August 1, 1924, and who in each succeeding year received not only the highest commendation from the Board of Trustees, but also the continuing approval of his work and accomplishments by the survey and inspection groups of the American College of Surgeons and the other professional and official groups whose duty it is to study hospital administration and standards over wide areas. During the twenty-five years of his administration, paralleling the tenure of Dr. Robert L. Schaeffer as Chief of Staff, he has seen the Hospital treat more than 190,000 patients as its yearly admissions increased from 3,447 to 13,658. He has been active in the planning and construction of the service building, the west wing, the west wing annex being completed during the golden anniversary year, and the other additions that have been made to the Hospital’s physical plant during the past quarter-century. As they were being added he constantly sought space for more beds and more cots to accommodate those needing and seeking hospitalization. Raising funds for that construction and for the other projects on the planning board have been among his increasing responsibilities.

The household staff which he and his associates direct, numbers nearly 250 of the 631 employes, student nurses, and internes required to maintain the institution and serve the needs of between four hundred and five hundred patients twenty-four hours of every day. For many of these employes, because of the nature and hours of their duty, the Hospital provides both board and lodging. To them and to its patients, the Hospital in 1948 served 1,020,597 meals, considerably more than are served during a similar period in a good-size hotel. Preparation and service of those meals, thousands of them specially prepared diets with each portion carefully calculated to meet the needs of individual patients, required a staff of five trained dietitians and a force of seventy-five domestic employes. To feed the family of more than 1,000 that was the Hospital’s average daily responsibility during 1948, the Superintendent and his assistants purchased 114,249 pounds of meat, 30,588 pounds of poultry, 12,388 pounds of butter, 24,535 dozens of eggs, 45,786 pounds of bread, 37,778 gallons of milk and cream, 2,972 pounds of cheese, 10,119 pounds of fish, 153,800 pounds of frozen, canned, and dried vegetables and fruits, 11,876 pounds of coffee, 1,945 pounds of cocoa, 6,600 pounds of flour, 1,420 pounds of jelly, 3,900 pounds of syrup, 2,860 pounds of noodles, 340 gallons of olives, 260 gallons of pickles, 1,329 pounds of rice, 24,766 pounds of sugar, and 2,640 pounds of salt. Tons of fresh fruits and vegetables, of potatoes, of shortening, and of the many grocery items in daily use in the average family were among the other items brought into

the larder.

It is the responsibility of the Superintendent, too, to purchase the hundreds of drugs and medications used each day in the treatment of Hospital patients. He must make certain that oxygen is on hand, that there is sufficient ice, that the supply of blankets, sheets, towels, bandages, and dressings is adequate for each day’s normal needs, and ample to provide for any emergency. His finger must be on the pulse of every department and function in the Hospital every hour of the year.

Mr. Sherer, to whom these duties have become routine, is a lifelong resident of Allentown. He prepared for a teaching career, graduating from Muhlenberg College with the Class of 1904. Turning to business rather than to teaching, he operated a laundry in Bethlehem for several years, and then became associated with L. F. Grammes Company. He was assistant superintendent of that industrial concern when he came to the Allentown Hospital to begin a career that through the years has gained him the esteem of the Trustees, the respect of the Staff, and the friendship and good will of the community he continues to serve faithfully and well.

Associated with Mr. Sherer as Assistant Superintendents are Ray T. Kern, Sr., who joined the staff in January 1932 as Chief Accountant, and Orlando M. Bowen, who was named an associate in November 1947.

Mr. Kern, a graduate of the Slatington High School and of the American Business College, has been an accountant since he became affiliated with the Thomas Kern Lumber Company in Slatington in 1905. He was bookkeeper for many years for the C. A. Dorney Furniture Company and, before entering the employ of the Hospital, was a member of the McKeever-Kern firm, accountants and auditors. Since 1933 he has been Secretary of the Eastern Central Hospital Association of Pennsylvania.

Mr. Bowen, formerly from Haddonfield, N. J., was graduated from Cornell University in 1940, with the bachelor of science degree in hotel administration. Before entering military service, he was Assistant Supervisor of Food Service for the Trans-Western airlines, now the Trans-World Airlines, and an Assistant Manager for the Stouffer restaurant chain in Detroit.

Responsibilities for the maintenance of the Hospital also are shared by Mrs. Mary L. Peters, a graduate of Southwestern College and a certified dietitian, the Chief Dietitian since 1929, and by Mrs. Ethel Wood, who was appointed Housekeeper in July 1948.

There are hundreds of others - clerks and secretaries, maids and cooks, orderlies and janitors, painters and carpenters, telephone operators and technicians — each sharing with the professional and nursing staffs the responsibility for the care and the attention each patient confidently expects when he or she enters the Allentown Hospital. They and their services are an important part of the fifty-year story of the Hospital.

THIS, TOO, IS A TASK

RESTORATION of the health of the sick and the injured is the prime responsibility of the Allentown Hospital. Of almost equal importance, however, is its educational function, the area through which it participates in maintaining a reservoir of trained physicians and nurses, surgeons, and other specialists who are at the call of those in need of their services.

As an arm of the nation’s medical schools, the Hospital has been providing practical training for their graduates through nearly all of its history. From the very outset is has been active in the education of nurses, a function considered elsewhere in this volume.

“An imperative duty, and one of the highest duties of the chiefs, is to guide, educate, instruct, and inspire the resident physician,” Dr. J. Chalmer Da Costa* said in an earlier period of the Hospital’s history. “In Pennsylvania a man cannot obtain a certificate to practice until he has served a term as a resident physician. This beneficent law is for the protection of the public. The term of service in a hospital should make the recent graduate a trained physician experienced in all the ordinary diseases and emergencies . . . The interne should be encouraged to ask questions and to discuss cases; he should be led, guided, saved from pitfalls; given every possible opportunity to help in operations and, when fit, to do operations under the direction of his chief. He must take histories and learn how to question a patient systematically and his histories should be read and revised by an experienced man. He should train his ear, his eye, his sense of touch by repeated examinations of patients. He should observe prescribing and the action of drugs, go through a course in the laboratory, and study, not only read up on his cases, but study systematically. Thus is a real physician made. What a great work a hospital is doing when it furnishes a community with highly qualified practical medical men.”

# Professor of Surgery, Jefferson Medical College, at the dedication of the Harvey Memorial, December 23, 1915.

The objectives enunciated by Dr. DaCosta are the tenets under which the Allentown Hospital and its Staff have participated in the training of 268 internes and more than a score of residents since Dr. William A. Hausman, Jr., later to become the first Chief of Staff and Surgical Dean of Allentown’s Sacred Heart Hospital, began his term as the Hospital’s first resident physician immediately after his graduation from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1902. Prior to that time, Dr. J. Treichler Butz, a young physician who had established his offices in Allentown, was on call for the Hospital duties that later became the assignments of the internes and residents.

Under the rigid rules for training and with its general policies, its standards, and its facilities, the Allentown Hospital was among the first in Pennsylvania to be recognized as an interne training center when the State Bureau of Medical Education and Licensure (now the State Board) in 1912 required graduates of medical schools to serve a period of internship before becoming eligible to practice their profession in the State. Its standards and its practices, the qualifications of its Staff, and the diversified care it offers have won for it the approval of the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Association, both for the training of internes and for the further training of residents. The American College of Surgeons also approves it for graduate training in surgery and in surgical specialties.

Of the 353 hospitals in Pennsylvania registered by the American Medical Association, it is one of twenty-six, sixteen of them in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, that hold similar triple accrediting. Many hospitals in Pennsylvania participate in the training of internes and practically all use their services. The American Medical Association’s Council on Medical Education and Hospitals, however, lists only eighty-one that fully meet its standards for training internes and eighty that it qualifies for the further training of residents. The American College of Surgeons has approved only thirty for graduate training in surgery or in a surgical specialty.8

The Allentown Hospital’s program provides for a full year of rotating internship for a maximum of ten medical school graduates, an additional year for two residents, three years for surgical residents in the graduate training division, and two years each for graduate residents in proctology, urology, medicine, pathology, and plastic surgery.

Working in clinics and in wards, always under the direct supervision of department chiefs and their associates, the internes gain a minimum of two months experience in surgery, in medicine, in obstetrics, in pediatrics, and in laboratory techniques. They are trained, also, in the Hospital’s emergency ward, in the X-ray Department, in the contagious disease section, in the Anaesthesia Department, and in each of the surgical and medical specialties. Facilities also are available for a dental interne whose training is supervised by the Chiefs of the Dental Department and the Department of Oral Surgery, the latter a relatively new but growing field of Hospital service. All internes and residents participate in regular Staff conferences and clinical discussions and, with their respective chiefs, review the most representative of the more than 13,000 cases that now are treated each year.

Internes are required to compile the case histories and maintain the medical and surgical records of patients in their respective area of service, and must visit all patients under their care each morning and evening and as frequently as the exigencies of the case require. It is not unusual for an interne to sacrifice his severely limited off-duty hours to maintain a constant vigil at the bedside of a critically ill patient. Their professional service is rendered under the direct supervision of a department chief or associate. They are responsible for keeping the attending physician or surgeon informed of all changes in the condition of a patient under his or her care. They are not permitted to engage in private practice, either in the Hospital or outside, and may accept no fees for the services they render. In all areas their work is carefully noted and made a part of the record that is transmitted to the State Board of Medical Education and Licensure.

All internes are selected by a committee of the Hospital Staff and are approved by the Board of Trustees. They are chosen from the graduating classes of the nation’s top-ranking medical schools and, under present regulations, serve from July 1 to June 30. Although they are required to live in the Hospital, where they are subject to twenty-four hour call, many of them come from homes in Allentown and the immediate vicinity and, through the years, a goodly number have established their practices in the Lehigh Valley. The Major Staff of the Hospital includes thirty-nine physicians and surgeons who served internships or residencies at the Allentown Hospital and thirty-five others, who completed their formal training under the Hospital’s program, are members of its Auxiliary Staff.*

* Staff Roster compiled January 1949.

Until 1912, when the Pennsylvania Legislature’s Act of 1911 became effective requiring a fifth year of instruction in medicine before a medical school graduate was qualified to take his State Board examinations, internships were voluntary. Frequently, they were served by a physician after he had been granted his license to practice. It was not unusual for men to enter private practice before completing their full term of one year, the period for which they generally were elected. Dr. Hausman was the Hospital’s only interne in 1902 and the late Dr. Jere F. McAvoy the only one in

1903. There were two or three in each of the next few years, but the late Dr. John D. Matz was the lone one serving during 1907-08. Gradually the Staff was increased as the Hospital expanded its facilities and cared for more patients; by 1925-26, five internes were on duty; by 1929-30, there were eight; by 1936-37, the number was increased to ten; and by 1938-39, the Resident Staff reached a peak of ten internes, one dental interne, and a chief resident. During the war years, when requirements for internships were reduced to nine months and when the Army and Navy placed many of the young doctors who completed their training in uniform into immediate service in their own institutions, the number dropped to five. Occasionally that reduced Staff was augmented by a resident or two, but the Hospital served an increasing number of patients only under the most severe handicaps. Members of the Hospital’s Major and Auxiliary Staffs, hard-pressed themselves by expanded private practices, shared duties of residents with the reduced Staff.

Dr. Nellie G. O’Dea, who served in 1915-16, was the first of twenty-nine women who have been internes and residents at the Hospital. Several other women have held staff positions as dental hygienists.

In all but one year since 1933, when Dr. Lloyd A. Stahl was named resident, the Hospital has given one or two members of each class of internes the opportunity to assume more responsibilities within the Hospital during a second year of service. The residents join with members of the regular Staffs in supervising and directing the assignments of the internes.

At least fifteen of those who completed internships or residencies at the Allentown Hospital have gone on to win certification by the American Boards in the fields in which they are specializing. More than a dozen hold fellowships in the American College groups in which they have their major professional interest. Two are in foreign lands as medical missionaries, and another is serving in a convent. Several hold top staff positions in other hospitals and a few are associated with the faculties of medical schools. Nearly one hundred relinquished their practices during World War II to serve in the Medical and Dental Corps of the Army or the Navy.

Of the 7,701 registered hospitals in the United States, its territories, and in Canada, the American College of Surgeons lists only 275 civilian institutions that are approved by it for graduate training in general surgery, and 738 accredited for such training in general surgery or in a specialized department of it. The Allentown Hospital received its approval in 1938 when it established surgical residencies in cooperation with the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. LeRoy Moyer, now Chief Surgeon of the Grandview Hospital in Sellersville and Associate Surgeon of the Community Hospital in Quakertown, was the first to complete his training under it. With Dr. Robert L. Schaeffer as their preceptor and with other American Board diplomates on the Staff associated in their training, four young surgeons have completed their graduate work under this program. More recently, the Hospital has been authorized to institute graduate training in urology under Dr. Willard Masonheimer; in pathology, under Dr. John J. Wenner; in plastic surgery, under Dr. Kerwin Marcks; in proctology, under Dr. Martin Kleckner; and in medicine, under Dr. Clyde Kelchner, all certified in their respective fields.

A program of graduate training, under the regulations of the American College of Surgeons, must be thoroughly organized and conducted with continuous supervision. Its correlation with clinical work and the definite progress of the resident to greater privileges and responsibilities must be given full consideration. Foremost among the essentials in developing and carrying on a graduate training program, the American College emphasizes:

“1. The will to teach, without which a program cannot be conceived.

“2. A staff of qualified surgeons, surgical specialists, and chiefs of adjunct medical services departmentalized to an extent sufficient to cover the scope of general surgical training and to conduct training in such surgical specialties as are to be included in the training program.

“3. Clinical material, adequate in amount, variety, and availability for teaching purposes. The number of ‘ward’ or ‘free’ patients, rather than the total bed capacity, is of significance in the latter requirement.

“4. Facilities within the hospital or as supplemented by affiliation with other hospitals or training institutions for the study of basic medical sciences in their practical application to clinical work.”

The Allentown Hospital has developed these facilities and is constantly maintaining and expanding them so that its teaching functions may be continued at the highest possible levels. Early in its second half-century the Hospital anticipates certification for graduate residencies in additional fields.

Teaching in another area, the Hospital cooperates with Cedar Crest College in providing the practical training required for the bachelor of science degree in the medical technology curriculum. Students enrolled for the work spend three years at Cedar Crest taking academic courses recommended by the Council on Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Association and the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, then one year in the Hospital laboratories working under the instruction and supervision of Dr. John J. Wenner and his associates. Upon satisfactory completion of the prescribed hospital course, which includes an examination given by the Registry Board, the student receives a bachelor of science degree from Cedar Crest and is certificated by the Hospital.

To maintain their associations with the Hospital, even though their professional practices may take them far from its doors, those who have served on its Interne and Resident Staff have formed an association that meets at least once each year.

The object of the Association of Resident and Ex-resident Physicians, its constitution points out, is to establish a closer and more definite social and scientific relationship between the resident and the ex-resident physicians of the Staff. Clinical sessions, a seminar to which outstanding teachers and practitioners are invited, and an informal banquet and party are highlights of the annual reunions.

That the Allentown Hospital well may be proud of the record of the men and women in whose professional training it has participated is indicated by their progress through the years. An attempt to chart their professional accomplishments has been made in the compilation that follows.9

INTERNES - RESIDENTS

1902

William A. Hausman, M.D., F.A.C.S. — Muhlenberg College, 1899; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1902; Certified by the American Board of Surgery; Chief of Staff and Dean of the Surgical Department of the Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, since 1915. Office, 1116 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

1903

Jere F. McAvoy, M.D. Deceased.

1904

William J. Creighton, M.D. - 37 South Twentieth Street, Philadelphia.

Clyde J. Saylor, M.D.-Lebanon Valley College, 1900; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1904; Consultant, Obstetrics and Pediatrics, Good Samaritan Hospital, Lebanon. Office, 368 North Eighth Street, Lebanon.

1905-1906

Mahlon G. Miller, M.D. — Kutztown State Teachers College, 1900; Medico Chirurgical College, 1905. Office, 21 West Twenty-First Street, Northampton.

William H. Greiss, M.D.

1906-1907

Joseph M. Weaver, M.D. Deceased.

E.    W. Feldhoff, M.D. Deceased.

1907-1908

John D. Matz, M.D. Deceased.

1908-1909

Robert L. Schaeffer, M.D., Sc.D., F.A.C.S. — Franklin and Marshall College, 1904; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1908; Certified by the American Board of Surgery; Chief of Staff and Surgeon-in-chief, Allentown Hospital, since 1924. Office, 30 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

Forrest G. Schaeffer, M.D. Deceased.

F.    LeRoy Schumacher, M.D. Deceased.

1909-1910

Frank S. Boyer, M.D. Deceased.

Oscar E. Salter, M.D. — 41 South Market Street, Shamokin.

1910-1911

Edwin S. Minner, M.D. — Medico Chirurgical College, 1910. Office, 349 Main Street, Egypt.

John S. Schneller, M.D. Deceased.

1911-1912

Edward J. Deibert, M.D. Deceased.

Harry B. Kern, M.D. — 856 Main Street, Slatington.

Fred G. Klotz, M.D., F.A.C.S. — Princeton University, 1907; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1911; Chief, Department of Gynecology, Allentown Hospital. Office, 126 North Ninth Street, Allentown.

1912-1913

Edwin L. Royer, M.D. — Bucknell University, 1908; Medico Chir-urgical College, 1912. Office, 21 East Water Street, Lock Haven; practice limited to eye, ear, nose, and throat.

Arthur C. Zuck, M.D. — Lafayette College, 1907; Jefferson Medical College, 1912; Neuropsychiatrist, Easton Hospital, Easton, and Warren Hospital, Phillipsburg, N. J. Office, 22 Broad Street, Washington, N. J.; practice limited to neuropsychiatry.

1913-1914

Newton G. Allebach, M.D. — Jefferson Medical College, 1913. Office, 27 South Front Street, Souderton.

Warren Kleppinger, M.D. Deceased.

Aaron D. Weaver, M.D. — Keystone State Teachers College, 1907; Medico Chirurgical College, 1913. Office, 110 East Main Street, Macungie.

1914-1915

Willard C. Masonheimer, M.D. — Lafayette College, 1910; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1914; Certified by the American Board of Urology; Chief, Department of Urology, Allentown Hospital. Office, 1314 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to urology.

Charles R. Sharpe, M.D. — Wake Forrest College; Jefferson Medical College, 1914; Chief of Staff, Lexington Memorial Hospital. Office, 23 West Second Street, Lexington, N. C.

Horace D. Washburn, M.D. Deceased.

1915-1916 Warren H. Butz, M.D. Deceased.

Mtt.frfd W. Myers, M.D. — 106 East Market Street, Warren, Ohio Nellie G. O’Dea, M.D. — 129 North Washington Street, Scranton. Samuel Zimmerman, M.D. — 91 St. Mark’s Place, New York, N. Y.

1916-1917

Foster A. Beck, M.D. - University of Maryland School of Medicine, 1916; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1917 to August 1919, Captain. Office, 402 Hanover Avenue, Allentown.

Jane R. Boudart, M.D. — Convent.

Jeremiah A. Klotz, M.D. — Breinigsville.

S. Emmart Rauch, M.D. — 433 Second Avenue, Bethlehem.

1917-1918

Ralph A. Fisher, M.D. — Medico Chirurgical College, 1913; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1917. Office, 819 Lehigh Street, Easton.

Harold F. Lanshe, M.D. — Muhlenberg College; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1907; Flight Surgeon, World War I; Chief, Department of Otolaryngology, Harrisburg Hospital of Contagious Diseases; Otolaryngologist, Harrisburg Hospital. Office, 1450 Market Street, Harrisburg; practice limited to otolaryngology.

Emily Rubright Shipman, M.D. — Woman’s Medical College, 1917; Obstetrical Staff and Medical Staff, Shamokin State Hospital. Office, 15 East Avenue, Mount Carmel.

1918-1919

Charles R. Fox, M.D. — Keystone State Normal School, 1911; Jefferson Medical College, 1918; United States Army Medical Corps Reserve, January 1918 to January 1919. Office, 1919 Washington Avenue, Northampton.

Walter W. Werley, M.D. — Keystone State Normal School, 1912; Jefferson Medical College, 1918; Certified by the American Board of Radiology; Chief, Department of Radiology, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Reading. Office, 1214 Walnut Street, Reading; practice limited to roentgenology.

1919-1920

Rowland W. Bachman, M.D. — University of Pennsylvania; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1919; Associate, Surgical Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 301 North Second Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery.

Elmer H. Bausch, M.D. - Muhlenberg College, 1914; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1919; Chief, Syphilology Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 252 North Seventh Street, Allentown.

Carl T. Newhart, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1915; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1919. Office, 18 Pine Street, Catasauqua.

1920-1921

William J. Corcoran, M.D., F.A.C.R. — University of Scranton, 1914; Georgetown University, 1920; Certified by American Board of Radiology; United States Army, January 1918 to December 1918, Private; Director, X-ray Department, Scranton State Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital, and West Mountain Sanatorium, Scranton, and Taylor Hospital, Taylor; St. Joseph’s Hospital, Carbondale; and Fairview State Hospital, Fairview. Office, 327 North Washington Avenue, Scranton; practice limited to roentgenology.

Harry Dunkelberger, M.D. — Valley View.

Floyd Uhler, M.D. — 340 Bushkill Street, Easton.

Ira Wentz, M.D. — 224 Webster Avenue, Seaside Heights, N. J.

1921-1922

LeRoy Dunkelberger, M.D. — Kutztown.

Charles P. Krum, M.D. Deceased.

John G. Mengel, M.D. — Albright College, 1917; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1921; United States Army, 1918, Private. Office, 408 Cumberland Street, Lebanon.

Willard G. Mengel, M.D. Deceased.

1922-1923

Clairmont A. Kressley, M.D., F.A.C.S. — Franklin and Marshall College, 1917; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1922; United States Army, 1918, Private; Associate Surgeon, Grandview Hospital, Sellersville. Office, 145 Diamond Street, Sellersville.

Ruth Miller, M.D. — 740 East State Street, Sharon.

Elizabeth Thomas Hill, M.D.— Tufts College; Tufts School of Medicine, 1922; Senior Physician, Metropolitan State Hospital, Waltham, Mass. Office, Metropolitan State Hospital, Waltham, Mass.; practice limited to psychiatry and neurology.

Raymond D. Tice, M.D. — Bucknell University, 1919; Jefferson Medical College, 1922; United States Army, September 1918 to December 1918, Private First Class; Associate Surgeon, Quakertown Community Hospital. Office, Third and Juniper Streets, Quakertown.

1923-1924

Harvey Bauman, M.D. — American General Conference of Menno-nites, Mission Christian Hospital, Champa, Central Provinces, India.

Mark A. Baush, M.D. Deceased.

David Goodman, M.D. — 168 Chestnut Street, Chelsea, Mass. Clarence Schwalm, M.D. Deceased.

1924-1925

Ella Garber Bauman, M.D. — American General Conference of Mennonites, Mission Christian Hospital, Champa, Central Provinces, India.

Milton H. Cloud, M.D. — Pennsylvania State College, 1920; Jefferson Medical College, 1924; United States Army Medical Corps, March 1941 to February 1946, Lieutenant Colonel; Obstetrical Staff, Uniontown Hospital. Office, 50 West Main Street, Union-town.

Albert R. Feinberg, M.D. — Pennsylvania State College, 1920; Jefferson Medical College, 1924; United States Army Medical Corps, June 1942 to August 1946, Colonel; Chief of Medicine, Mercy Hospital, Wilkes Barre. Office, 186,South Franklin Street, Wilkes Barre; practice limited to internal medicine.

Ralph H. Henry, M.D. — Pennsylvania State College, 1921; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1924; Chief, Physiotherapy Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 102 North Tenth Street, Allentown.

1925-1926

Fred F. Bergdoll, M.D.— Lehigh University, 1922; Temple University School of Medicine, 1925; Chief of Surgery, York Hospital. Office, 701 South George Street, York; practice limited to surgery.

John J. Bernhard, M.D., F.A.C.S. — University of Buffalo; University of Buffalo School of Medicine, 1925; United States Navy Medical Corps, July 1942 to January 1946, Commander; Chief, Obstetrical Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 33 North Seventeenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to obstetrics and gynecology.

Vorha B. Haffner, M.D. — Ottawa University, 1919; Grand Island College, 1920; Boston University School of Medicine, 1925. Office, Bennett Building, Ottawa, Kansas.

Newton Mills, M.D.— 6812 Lyons Avenue, Houston, Texas.

Mary L. Small (Miles), M.D. — University of Tennessee, 1917; Johns Hopkins Medical School, 1925; Certified by American Board of Ophthalmology; Surgical Staff, Baltimore Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital. Office, 18 West Read Street, Baltimore, Md.; practice limited to ophthalmology.

1926-1927

William B. Barr, M.D. — Temple University, 1922; Jefferson Medical College, 1926; Fellow, National Gastro-enterological Association; Chief, Gastro-intestinal Department and Gastro-intestinal Clinic, Allentown Hospital. Office, 73S Turner Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

Dr. Kinsey. Deceased.

Eugene H. Mohr, M.D. — Muhlenberg College; Temple University School of Medicine, 1926. Office, Alburtis.

Paul W. Ramer, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1922; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1926; Associate, Department of Syphilology, and Chief of the Venereal Disease Clinic, Allentown Hospital. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to syphilology.

Charles Ruch, M.D. — Momence, 111.

1927-1928

William F. Fox, M.D., F.I.C.A. — Muhlenberg College; Jefferson Medical College, 1927; Chief of Anaesthesia, Allentown Hospital, 1929-1944; Associate, Department of Proctology, Allentown Hospital. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Mary W. Hamilton, M.D. — 536 Highland Avenue, Greensburg.

Marian Paulosky, M.D. — 10 Sunbury Street, Minersville.

James Andy, M.D.

James A. Welty, M.D. — Pennsylvania State College, 1922; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1927; United States Army Air Corps, February 1918 to December 1918, Second Lieutenant; Obstetrical Staff, Oil City Hospital; President, Medical Staff, Oil City Hospital, 1948-1949. Office, 126 State Street, Oil City.

1928-1929

Halburt H. Earp, M.D. — Jefferson Medical College, 1928; United States Army Medical Corps, May 1942 to August 1946, Lieutenant Colonel, Officer of the Order of the Crown of Belgium. Office, 900 North Lombardy Street, Richmond, Va.

J. Roland Heller, M.D. Deceased.

Fred C. Knappenberger, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1924; Jefferson Medical College, 1928. Office, 215 American Street, Fullerton.

Jacob J. Levy, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1924; Jefferson Medical College, 1928; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1942 to March 1946, Major; Associate, Department of Urology, Allentown Hospital. Office, 44 South Tenth Street, Allentown.

Thomas Morgan, M.D. Deceased.

Theodore S. Weiss, M.D. - Lehigh University, 1920; Temple University School of Medicine, 1928; Senior Psychiatrist, Bellevue Psychiatric Hospital, New York. Office, 76 West Twelfth Street, New York, N. Y.; practice limited to psychiatry.

1929-1930

Ethelyn J. C. Anderson, M.D. (Mrs. Harvey Kofalk) - Syracuse University, 1923; Cornell University School of Medicine, 1929. Office, 195 Euclid Avenue, Ridgefield Park, N. J.

Joseph R. Bierman, M.D. — New York University, 1926; Bellevue Medical College, 1929. Office, 1028 Chew Street, Allentown.

J. Zern Heberling, M.D. — Bucknell University, 1925; Jefferson Medical College, 1929. Office, 207 Market Street, Bangor; practice limited to ophthalmology.

Margaret James, M.D. Deceased.

Clyde H. Kelchner, M.D., F.A.C.P. — Muhlenberg College, 1925; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1929; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to October 1946, Major; Certified by American Board of Internal Medicine; Chief, Medical Department, Allentown Hospital; Associate Professor of Medicine, Graduate School of the University of Pennsylvania. Office, 1125 Turner Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

Wallace J. Lowright, Jr., M.D. — Franklin and Marshall College, 1925; Temple University School of Medicine, 1929; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1942 to November 1945, Captain. Office, Center Valley.

Lewis A. Smith, M.D. — Lafayette College, 1916; Jefferson Medical College, 1929; United States Army, 1918, Lieutenant; United States Army Medical Corps, March 1941 to February 1942. Office, 357 Spring Garden Street, Easton.

Wayne G. Stump, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1918; Jefferson Medical College, 1929; Associate, Surgical Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 518 North Ninth Street, Allentown.

1930-1931

Harry L. Cunin, M.D. - Muhlenberg College; Temple University School of Medicine, 1930. Office, 1801 Walnut Street, Allentown; practice limited to otolaryngology.

Alfred Dietrich, Tr., M.D. — Brandywine Sanatorium, Marshallton, Del.

Fook Hing Tong, M.D. — University of Hawaii, 1926; Jefferson Medical College, 1930; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1940 to February 1946, Major; Assistant City and County Physician, Honolulu. Office, 1231 South Beretania Street, Honolulu, Hawaii.

Kerwin H. Marcks, M.D., F.A.C.S. — University of Virginia, 1926; Jefferson Medical College, 1930; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1942 to September 1945, Lieutenant Colonel; Chief, Department of Plastic Surgery, Allentown Hospital; Plastic Surgeon, Sacred Heart Hospital. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Nicholas M. Romano, M.D. — University of Maryland, 1926; University of Maryland School of Medicine, 1930; Assistant, Pediatric Staff, Easton Hospital. Office, 104 South Second Street, Bangor.

William M. Stauffer, M.D. — Bluffton College; University of Chicago, 1920; University of Chicago Rush Medical College, 1930; Associate, Dermatology Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 335 North Eighth Street, Allentown.

Willard H. Tice, M.D. — Bucknell University, 1926; Temple University School of Medicine, 1930; United States Navy Medical Corps, August 1942 to December 1945, Commander. Office, Third and Juniper Streets, Quakertown.

Joseph Schantz, M.D. Deceased.

1931-1932

Fernando F. De La Vara, M.D. — Temple University, 1926; Hahnemann Medical College, 1931; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1944 to March 1946, Captain. Office, 35 North Fifth Street, Allentown.

A. J. Kaufman, M.D. — 39 North Church Street, Carbondale.

Mitchell E. Katz, M.D. — University of Pennsylvania; Temple University School of Medicine, 1931; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1942 to January 1946, Major; Associate, Pediatric Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 650 Turner Street, Allentown.

Gerald E. Koncle, M.D. — University of Pittsburgh, 1930; University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 1931. Office, Sheridan.

Joan F. McGreevy, M.D. — University of Maryland; George Washington University School of Medicine, 1931; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1944 to May 1946, Captain; Staff Physician, Veterans Hospital, Perry Point, Md. Office, Veterans Hospital, Perry Point, Md.

Paul M. Nase, M.D. — Franklin and Marshall College, 1927; Hahnemann Medical College, 1931; Radiology and Obstetrics, Grandview Hospital. Office, 330 Main Street, Souderton.

Kenneth Weston, M.D. - Pennsylvania State College, 1927; Hahnemann Medical College, 1931; United States Navy Medical Corps, August 1940 to June 1946, Commander, Bronze Star; Chief,’ Orthopedic Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 1034 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to orthopedics.

Takeo Yamashita, M.D., F.A.C.S. — University of Hawaii, 1927; Washington University School of Medicine, 1931; Certified by American Board of Surgery. Office, 25 South Tenth Street, Allentown . Resident, 1940-1942.

1932-1933

Warren Endres, M.D. - Juniata College; Jefferson Medical College, 1932; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1942 to November 1945, Major. Office, Fogelsville.

Cornelius A. Gallagher, M.D. — Villanova College, 1928; Temple University School of Medicine, 1932; United States Army, World War I, Private. Office, 534 North Sixth Street, Allentown.

William Haines, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1928; Hahnemann Medical College, 1932; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to April 1944, First Lieutenant. Office, 731 Main Street, Slatington; practice limited to internal medicine and clinical pathology.

Herman F. Meckstroth, M.D. — Ursinus College, 1928; Jefferson Medical College, 1932; United States Army Medical Corps, April

1941 to January 1946, Major. Office, 718 St. John Street, Allentown.

Robert E. Mitchell, M.D. — Bucknell University, 1927; Hahnemann Medical College, 1932; Medical Staff, Coaldale State Hospital. Office, 604 North Street, East Mauch Chunk.

Walter M. Smith, M.D. — University of Delaware, 1928; Temple University School of Medicine, 1932; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to October 1945, Captain. Office, 119 South Main Street, Richlandtown.

Lloyd A. Stahl, M.D. — Susquehanna University; Jefferson Medical College, 1932; Associate, Medical Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 101 North Thirteenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine. Resident, 1933-1934.

Barney A. Stegura, M.D. — Hahnemann School of Science, 1928; Hahnemann Medical College, 1932; United States Army Medical Corps, March 1944 to October 1945, First Lieutenant. Office, 630 South Hanover Street, Nanticoke; practice limited to ophthalmology.

1933-1934

Vincent J. Cassone, M.D. - Danville State Hospital, Danville.

George A. Dunkelberger, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1929; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1933. Office, Bern-ville.

Lewis Leiby, M.D. — Franklin and Marshall College, 1929; Jefferson Medical College, 1933; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to April 1946, Major. Office, 1108 Main Street, Slatington.

Kenneth G. Reinheimer, M.D. — Bucknell University, 1929; Temple University School of Medicine, 1933; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to January 1946, Major. Office, Bridge Street, Weissport.

Byron D. Wilkins, M.D. — Hahnemann School of Science, 1929; Hahnemann Medical College, 1933; United States Navy Medical Corps, 1942-1946, Lieutenant Commander; Associate, Proctology Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 349 North Seventh Street, Allentown; practice limited to proctology.

Arthur J. Wise, M.D. — Hahnemann School of Science, 1929; Hahnemann Medical College, 1933; Chief, Obstetrical Department, Grandview Hospital, Sellersville. Office, Broad Street, Souderton.

Ralph C. Worrell, M.D. — Hahnemann School of Science, 1929; Hahnemann Medical College, 1933; United States Army Medical Corps, June 1942 to September 1945, Captain. Office, Spring-town.

Anna Ziegler, M.D. — Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1921; Teachers College of Columbia University, B.S. in Nursing Education, 1926; New York University School of Medicine, 1933; Associate, Obstetrical Department, Allentown Hospital. On leave, 1946-1949.

1934-1935

Walter A. Banks, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1930; Temple University School of Medicine, 1934; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to May 1946, Major. Office, Main and Church Streets, Macungie.

William W. Bonney, M.D. — Susquehanna University, 1927; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1934; Chief, Otolaryngology, Assistant Anaesthesiologist, Grandview Hospital, Sellersville. Office, Fifth and Walnut Streets, Perkasie.

Homer B. Fegley, M.D. — Hahnemann School of Science, 1932; Hahnemann Medical College, 1934; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to March 1946, Captain, Legion of Merit. Office, 131 Front Street, Catasauqua. Surgical Resident, Sacred Heart Hospital, 1949.

Harry S. Good, M.D., F.A.C.S. — Muhlenberg College, 1928; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1934; United States Navy Medical Corps, October 1941 to October 1945, Commander; Associate, Surgical Department and Dispensary Staff, Allentown Hospital. Office, 1248 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery. Surgical Resident 1935-36.

Mark D. Grim, M.D. — Lafayette College, 1930; Jefferson Medical College, 1934; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1942 to January 1946, Captain. Office, Oley.

Earl B. Hartman, M.D. — Lafayette College, 1931; Temple University School of Medicine, 1934. Office, 15 South Main Street, Nazareth.

Roman A. Harton, M.D. — University of North Carolina, 1928; Temple University School of Medicine, 1934. Office, 123 West Main Street, Durham, N. C.

William E. Krewson, III, M.D., F.A.C.S. — Wesleyan University, 1930; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1934; Certified by American Board of Ophthalmology; Ophthalmologist, University of Pennsylvania Graduate Hospital; Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School. Office, 1930 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia; practice limited to ophthalmology.

Marvin R. Thomas, D.D.S. — University of Maryland, 1934; United States Army Dental Corps, August 1942 to May 1946, Captain. Office, Main Street, Slatington.

1935-1936

Harry S. Beitel, D.D.S. — Lafayette College, 1931; Temple University School of Dentistry, 1935; United States Navy Dental Corps, October 1942 to February 1946, Lieutenant Commander; Associate, Dental Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 141 North Ninth Street, Allentown.

Herman R. Bull, M.D. — Colorado College, 1931; Jefferson Medical College, 1935; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to March 1946, Major; Surgical Staff, St. Mary’s Hospital, Grand Junction, Colo. Office, 1 National Bank Building, Grand Junction, Colo.

Hyman S. Denberg, M.D. — University of Pennsylvania, 1931; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1935; United States Army Medical Corps, December 1942 to January 1946, Captain. Office, 800 North Negley Avenue, Pittsburgh.

Clarence W. Lindeman, M.D., Ph.D. — Dickinson College, 1926; A.M., Columbia University, 1929; Ph.D., New York University, 1931; Hahnemann Medical College, 1935. Office, 1 West Main Street, Waynesboro.

Morgan D. Person, M.D. — Franklin and Marshall College, 1930; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1935; Associate, Medical Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 1336 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Ludwig J. Oblazney, M.D. Deceased.

Kash S. Peters, M.D. Deceased.

Carlin O. Williams, M.D. — Pennsylvania State College; Temple University School of Medicine, 1935; Associate, Medical Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 1337 Hamilton Street, Allentown. Resident, 1936-1937.

William W. Zimmerman, M.D. — Purcellville, Va.

1936-1937

Frederick D. Fister, M.D. — Lafayette College, 1932; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1936. Office, Trexlertown.

David H. Gansman, M.D. — University of Pennsylvania, 1932; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1936; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1940 to March 1946, Major; Assistant, Cardiology Department, Jewish Hospital, Philadelphia. Office, 5500 Wayne Avenue, Philadelphia.

Frederick G. Helwig, M.D. — Franklin and Marshall College, 1932; George Washington University School of Medicine, 1936; United States Army Medical Corps, February 1941 to January 1945, Captain; Associate, Medical Department, Dispensary Staff, and Chief, Diabetic Clinic, Allentown Hospital. Office, 28 North Fifteenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

Violet H. Kidd, M.D.— Temple University, 1932; Temple University School of Medicine, 1936; Child Health Physician, Bureau of Child Welfare, Pittsburgh. Office, 501 Fourth Street, Brad-dock.

Albert E. Kratzer, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1932; Temple University School of Medicine, 1936. Office, 559 Chestnut Street, Emmaus.

LeRoy M. Moyer, M.D., F.A.C.S. — Muhlenberg College, 1932; Jefferson Medical College, 1936; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to May 1946, Major; Chief Surgeon, Grandview Hospital, Sellersville; Associate Surgeon, Quakertown Community Hospital; Certified by American Board of Surgery. Office, 52 West Broad Street, Souderton. Chief Resident, 1937-1938; Surgical Resident, 1939-1941.

Ray W. Pickel, M.D.—Lebanon Valley College, 1932; Temple University School of Medicine, 1936; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to March 1946, Major, Bronze Star with two clusters, Knight of the Order of Orange, Nassau. Office, 47 Cherry Street, Walnutport.

Charles P. Sell, M.D. — Muhlenberg College; Hahnemann Medical College, 1936; Associate, Medical Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 1827 Tilghman Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

Irvin V. Uhler, D.D.S. — Muhlenberg College; Temple University School of Dentistry, 1937; United States Navy Dental Corps, September 1942 to February 1946, Lieutenant; Oral Surgeon’ Lancaster General Hospital; Consulting Oral Surgeon, St. Joseph’s Hospital. Office, 548 North Duke Street, Lancaster; practice limited to oral surgery.

Virginia Wallace, M.D. — University of Kentucky, 1932; Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1936; Staff, Patty A. Clay Infirmary, Richmond, Ky. Office, Irvine, Ky.

William J. Wirth, M.D. - Lafayette College, 1930; Temple University School of Medicine, 1936; Fellow, American Academy of Occupational Medicine; Medical Supervisor, Remington Rand Co., N. Y. Office, North Main Street, Middleville, N. Y.; industrial practice.

1937-1938

George W. Heintzelman, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1933; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1937; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to December 1945, Major, Bronze Star. Office, Neffs.

David F. Hottenstein, M.D. — University of Virginia; Hahnemann Medical College, 1937; United States Navy Medical Corps, Lieutenant Commander. Office, Bally.

Carl O. Keck, M.D. — Lafayette College, 1934; Hahnemann Medical College, 1937. Office, Lehigh University, Bethlehem; practice limited to Lehigh University campus.

John Z. McFarland, III, D.D.S. — Main Street, North Wales.

Roger J. Minner, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1933; Jefferson Medical College, 1937; United States Army Medical Corps, December 1942 to June 1944, Lieutenant; Associate, Gastro-intestinal Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 143 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to internal medicine.

W. Frederick Ort, M.D. — Bucknell University, 1933; Temple University School of Medicine, 1937; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1942 to January 1946, Major, Bronze Star. Office, Third and Juniper Streets, Quakertown.

Harvey W. Scholl, M.D. — Ursinus College, 1933; Jefferson Medical College, 1937; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1942 to February 1946, Captain. Office, 224 Fourth Street, East Greenville.

Myrtle M. Siegfried, M.D. (Mrs. Michael Vigilante) — Albright College, 1933; George Washington University School of Medicine, 1937. Office, 1344 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

J. Willard Strouse, M.D. — Bucknell University, 1933; Temple University School of Medicine, 1937; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1942 to January 1946, Captain, Bronze Star. Office, Green Street, Hulmeville.

Robert J. Turnbach, M.D.Villanova College, 1929; Temple University School of Medicine, 1937; United States Navy Medical Corps, December 1942 to January 1946, Lieutenant Commander; Chief, Department of Cardiology and of the Cardiology Clinic, Allentown Hospital. Office, 1443 Linden Street, Allentown; practice limited to cardiology. Resident, 1939.

Pauline K. Wenner, M.D. — Bucknell University, 1932; Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1937; United States Navy Medical Corps, November 1942 to January 1946, Lieutenant; Associate, Pathology Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 44 North Thirteenth Street, Allentown.

1938-1939

Walter T. Becker, M.D. — Marquette University, 1930; Marquette Medical College, 1934; United States Army Medical Corps, January 1941 to March 1946, Colonel, Legion of Merit; Certified by American Board of Surgery. Office, 502 Third Street, Wausau, Wis. Surgical Resident, 1938-1939.

E. Eugene Cleaver, M.D. — Franklin and Marshall College, 1934; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1938; United States Army Medical Corps, February 1941 to January 1946, Major, Silver Star. Office, 300 Main Street, East Greenville.

Robert H. Dilcher, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1934; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1938; United States Army Medical Corps, January 1941 to December 1945, Captain; Associate, Department of Urology, Allentown Hospital. Office, 1648 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to urology. Resident, 1939-1940, 1946-1948.

Ruth L. Ditchey, M.D. — Bucknell University, 1934; Temple University School of Medicine, 1938. Office, 617 East Broad Street, T amaqua.

Otis M. Eves, M.D. — Earlham College, 1933; Temple University School of Medicine, 1938. Office, 700 Market Street, Berwick.

Charles F. Johnson, M.D. — Lafayette College, 1934; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1938. Office, 216 North Fourth Street, Emmaus.

J. Kenneth Miller, D.D.S. — Muhlenberg College; Temple University School of Dentistry, 1938; United States Navy Dental Corps, October 1942 to November 1945, Captain; Associate, Dental Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 27 North Fifteenth Street, Allentown.

John J. Sassaman, M.D. — Villanova College, 1930; Hahnemann Medical College, 1938; United States Navy Medical Corps, April 1940 to October 1945, Lieutenant Commander. Office, 1412 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Morton I. Silverman, M.D. - Muhlenberg College, 1934; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1938; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to February 1946, Captain; Associate, Medical Department, Department of Neurology, Allentown Hospital. Office, 1323 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Lewis F. Sprague, M.D. — 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Ethan L. Trexler, M.D. — Franklin and Marshall College, 1933; Hahnemann Medical College, 1938; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to May 1946, Major; Assistant in Medicine, Community General Hospital, Reading. Office, 15 South Franklin Street, Fleetwood.

William F. Weisel, M.D. — Lafayette College, 1934; Temple University School of Medicine, 1938; United States Army Medical Corps, June 1944 to June 1946, Captain. Office, 444 East Broad Street, Quakertown.

1939-1940

Dill J. Albright, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1933; Temple University School of Medicine, 1939; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1942 to March 1946, Captain. Office, Orefield.

George C. Brong, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1935; Hahnemann Medical College, 1939; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1942 to October 1945, Captain, Bronze Star. Office, Main Street, Bath.

Richard L. Cope, D.D.S. — Muhlenberg College; Temple University School of Dentistry, 1939; United States Army Dental Corps, June 1942 to January 1946, Captain; Staff Dentist, Grandview Hospital, Sellersville. Office, 31 North Main Street, Telford.

Harold E. Everett, M.D. — Muhlenberg College; Temple University School of Medicine, 1939; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1942 to October 1945, Captain, Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster. Office, 1730 Lincoln Avenue, Northampton.

George M. Knoll, M.D. — Albright College, 1931; Jefferson Medical College, 1939; United States Army Medical Corps, May 1941 to September 1945, Major; graduate study in dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine.

Charles C. Koniver, M.D. — Villanova College, 1935; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1939. Office, 1145 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Raphael A. Levin, M.D. — University of Pennsylvania, 1935; Jefferson Medical College, 1939; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1941 to June 1946, Captain. Office, 6032 North Catherine Street, Philadelphia.

Charles B. McClain, M.D.—Juniata College, 1935; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1939; Surgeon, Lewistown Hospital. Office, 18 North Main Street, Lewistown; practice limited to surgery.

Esther Montgomery Buchanan, M.D. — Muskingon College, 1935; Temple University School of Medicine, 1939; attending Bellevue Medical Center, New York. Residence, 43 Meadowoods, Lake Success, N. Y.; practice limited to anaesthesiology.

Harriet L. Stapp, M.D. — Ursinus College, 1935; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1939; Medical and Obstetrical Staff, Pottstown Hospital. Office, 392 King Street, Pottstown.

Frederic M. J. Walp, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1932; Duke University School of Medicine, 1939; United States Navy Medical Corps, April 1942 to July 1946, Lieutenant Commander. Office, 324 High Street, Pottstown. Resident, 1940-1941.

1940-1941

Herbert C. Foster, D.D.S. — Muhlenberg College, 1934; Temple University School of Dentistry, 1940; United States Navy Dental Corps, April 1942 to October 1946, Lieutenant Commander; Instructor in Pedodontia, Temple University School of Dentistry. Office, 6116 Tackawanna Street, Philadelphia.

Robert R. Frantz, M.D.— Ursinus College, 1935; Temple University School of Medicine, 1940; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1941 to December 1945, Captain. Office, 4216 Baltimore Avenue, Philadelphia.

Charles P. Goldsmith, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1936; Temple University School of Medicine, 1940; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1941 to January 1946, Captain. Office, 1648 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to ophthalmology.

Allen R. Kannapel, M.D. — Pennsylvania State College, 1936; Hahnemann Medical College, 1940; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1941 to January 1946, Major; Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Hahnemann Hospital. Office, 250 South 18th Street, Philadelphia; practice limited to obstetrics and gynecology.

Lawrence J. Kopf, M.D. — Johns Hopkins University, 1935; Hahnemann Medical College, 1940; United States Army Medical Corps, June 1942 to January 1946, Captain; Associate, Obstetrics Department, Community Hospital, Sunbury. Office, 315 Orange Street, Northumberland.

Forrest G. Moyer, M.D. - Muhlenberg College, 1935; Temple University School of Medicine, 1940; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1941 to January 1946, Major, Air Medal; Associate, Pediatric Department and Chief, Pediatric Clinic, Allentown Hospital. Office, 227 North 17th Street, Allentown; practice limited to pediatrics.

Ethel Powell, M.D. - 1719 East Third Street, Long Beach, Calif.

Doris M. Schmeer —738 Green Street, Allentown.

Edwin F. Tait, M.D., Ph.D. - Temple University, 1925; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1932; University of Minnesota School of Medicine, 1940; Certified by American Board of Ophthalmology; Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology; Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, Temple University Medical School; Chief Ophthalmologist, Temple University Hospital, Montgomery Hospital, Norristown, and Elm Terrace Hospital, Lansdale. Office, 1324 West Main Street, Norristown; practice limited to ophthalmology.

Richard S. Troxel, M.D. — Pennsylvania State College, 1936; Temple University School of Medicine, 1940; United States Army Medical Corps, September 1941 to April 1946, Lieutenant Colonel; Associate, Dispensary Staff, Allentown Hospital. Office, 46 South Thirteenth Street, Allentown.

Albert H. Voegele, M.D.— Johns Hopkins University, 1936; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1940; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to February 1946, Captain. Office, 240 Park Avenue, West, Mansfield, Ohio; practice limited to internal medicine.

Thomas H. Weaber, Jr., M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1936; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1940; United States Army Medical Corps, April 1944 to September 1946, Captain; Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Director, Student Health Service, Muhlenberg College. Office, 211 North Eighth Street, Allentown. Medical Resident 1941-42.

1941-1942

Edwin P. Albright, M.D. — Resident, 1942-1943.

George S. Boyer, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1937; Temple University School of Medicine, 1941; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to November 1945, Captain; Associate, Surgical Department, Allentown Hospital. Office, 740 North Nineteenth Street, Allentown; practice limited to general surgery. Surgical Resident, 1946-1948.

John D. Carapella, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1934; Jefferson Medical College 1941; United States Army Medical Corps, July

1944 to October 1946, Captain; Associate Chief, Medical Clinic, Allentown Hospital. Office, 34 North Thirteenth Street, Allentown. Resident, 1942-1943.

Helen M. Crocker, M.D. — Lodge Road, Briarcliff Manor, N. Y.

Betty Deibert (Mrs. George S. Boyer), Dental Hygienist—740 North Nineteenth Street, Allentown.

Frederick A. Dry, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1937; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1941; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to December 1945, Captain, Bronze Star, Silver Star, Croix de Guerre with Palm. Office, 224 Main Street, Emmaus.

Andrew J. Guay, M.D. Deceased.

Lydia Hershberger Emery, M.D. — University of Iowa; University of Iowa School of Medicine, 1941; United States Navy Medical Corps, September 1943 to December 1945, Lieutenant. Office, Yoncalla, Oregon. Medical and Pediatric Resident, 1942-1943.

Byron E. Kern, D.D.S. — Muhlenberg College; University of Pennsylvania School of Dentistry, 1941; United States Army Dental Corps, July 1942 to June 1946, Major. Office, Schnecksville, Route 1.

Robert E. Lentz, M.D. — University of Pennsylvania, 1937; Temple University School of Medicine, 1941; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1942 to March 1946, Captain. Office, 2004 South Fifth Street, Allentown.

Halvey E. Marx, M.D.— Lehigh University, 1937; Jefferson Medical College, 1941; United States Army Medical Corps, August

1942 to April 1946, Lieutenant Colonel; Teaching Fellow, Jefferson Medical College. Office, 4213 Chester Avenue, Philadelphia; practice limited to pathology.

Frank S. Peters, M.D. — Duke University, 1937; Temple University School of Medicine, 1941; United States Army Medical Corps, May 1943 to February 1946, Major, Bronze Star, Purple Heart; Chief of Medical Service, Nanticoke State Hospital. Office, 101 South Market Street, Nanticoke.

Oliver S. Schadt, Jr., M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1937; Jefferson Medical College, 1941; United States Army Medical Corps, August 1942 to March 1946, Major, Purple Heart. Office, 721 Turner Street, Allentown.

1942-1943

Frank R. Boyer, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1938; Temple University School of Medicine, 1942; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1943 to July 1946, Major; Associate, Medical Department, and Associate Chief, Medical Clinic, Allentown Hospital. Office, 16 North Second Street, Allentown.

Aris Carpousis, D.D.S.— 314 North Tenth Street, Reading.

Naomi Green, M.D. — George Washington University; George Washington University School of Medicine, 1942; Assistant, Obstetrics, and Gynecology, Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania. Office, 422 Medical Arts Building, Philadelphia; practice limited to obstetrics and gynecology.

Earl R. Knox, M.D. — on Highway 169, North Kansas City, Mo.

Lucien Pastore, M.D. — Ballston Spa, N. Y.

Lola Stuart Reed, M.D.-Ursinus College, 1938; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1942; Assistant in Pediatrics, Phoenixville Hospital. Office, 120 Gay Street, Phoenixville; practice limited to pediatrics.

Frances C. Schaeffer, M.D. — Bryn Mawr College, 1938; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1942; Associate, Obstetrical Department, and Chief, Pre-natal and Post-natal Clinic, Allentown Hospital. Office, 26 North Eighth Street, Allentown; practice limited to obstetrics and gynecology.

April 1, 1943 to December 31, 1943

William C. Grasley, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1939; Hahnemann Medical College, 1943; United States Army Medical Corps, March 1942 to July 1946, Captain. Residence, 1514 Allen Street, Allentown. Resident, 1948-1949.

Kenneth P. Lambert, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1939; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1943; United States Army Medical Corps, April 1943 to November 1946, Major, Bronze Star. Office, 234 West Main Street, Kutztown.

William F. Utterman, M.D .— DeBeque, Colo.

Harold P. Weaver, M.D. — Columbia University, 1940; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1943; Associate Surgeon, Coaldale State Hospital. Office, Coaldale State Hospital, Coal-dale. Surgical Resident, 1944-1945; practice limited to surgery.

Richard D. Williams, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1939; Hahnemann Medical College, 1943; Public Health Service, January

1944    to November 1945, Lieutenant, junior grade. Office, 358 Delaware Avenue, Palmerton.

January 1, 1944 to September 30, 1944

Louis P. Baylor, M.D. - 109 Bloom Street, Danville.

William J. Brensinger, M.D.— Japan. Resident, 1944-1946.

Frank Lipcius, M.D. - Temple University, 1940; Hahnemann Medical College, 1943; United States Army Medical Corps, January

1945    to February 1947, Captain. Office, 543 Chester Pike, Prospect Park.

Front: Henry F. Fetterman, M.D., Medical Resident; Stanley J. Yamula, M.D., Surgical Resident; Charles D. Schaeffer, M.D., Surgical Resident; George W. Thoma, Jr., M.D., Pathological Resident; ■William C. Grasley, M.D., Surgical Resident. Middle: Robert W. Leipold, M.D.; Gilbert M. Hoffman, M.D.; Luther R. Zehner, M.D.; Dan Oniki, M.D.; Earl S. Reimer, M.D.

Back-. Kenneth E. Jones, M.D.; Donald M. Feigley, M.D.; Robert P. Fenstermacher, Jr., M.D.; George P. Rutt, M.D.; Robert J. Beitel, M.D.

John Pfromm, M.D. — Franklin and Marshall College, 1940; Hahnemann Medical College, 1943; United States Army Medical Corps, October 1944 to December 1946, Captain. Office, 1648 Hamilton Street, Allentown; practice limited to otolaryngology and bron-cho-esophagology.

Richard S. Refowich, M.D. — Villanova College, 1940; Jefferson Medical College, 1944; United States Army Medical Corps, November 1944 to December 1947, Captain; Assistant, Outpatient Clinics, Dermatology Department, Philadelphia General Hospital. Office, 320 South Eighteenth Street, Philadelphia; practice limited to dermatology and syphilology.

October 1944 to June 30, 1945

Walter J. Blasco, M.D. — Allentown, Route J*

Patricia M. Kamsler, M.D.— Hunter College, 1941; Temple University School of Medicine, 1944; Assistant Chief Medical Anaesthetist, Philadelphia General Hospital. Office, Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia; practice limited to anaesthesiology. Surgical Resident 1945.

Vera J. Krisukas, M.D. — Pennsylvania State College, 1941; Temple University School of Medicine, 1944. Office, 941 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Bruce R. Marger, M.D. — Franklin and Marshall College; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1944; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1942 to June 1947, Captain; attending University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine.

Fred H. McClain, Jr., M.D.— Juniata College, 1941; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1944; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1945 to April 1947, Captain. Office, 117 West Shirley Street, Mount Union.

Hugh J. Rogers, M.D. — Pennsylvania State College, 1941; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1944; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1945 to April 1947, Captain. Office, 203 South Spring Street, Bellefonte.

July 1, 1945 to April 1946

Charles E. Eby, M.D. — 24 Boulevard, New Rochelle, N. Y.

Charles D. Schaeffer, M.D. — Haverford College, 1942; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1945. Surgical Resident, 1948

David M. Sensenig, M.D. — 309 Bangor Road, Bala-Cynwyd.

Allan E. Trevaskis, M.D. — Harvard University, 1942; University of Maryland School of Medicine, 1945; United States Army Medical Corps, May 1946 to April 1948, Captain. Surgical Resident, South Baltimore General Hospital, 1948 —.

February 1, 1946 to February 1, 1947

Hilda G. Ruch, M.D. — Swarthmore College; Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania. Office, Flicksville.

1946-1947

Hobart T. Feldman, M.D. - University of Pittsburgh, 1943; University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 1946. Office, 707 East Third Street, Bloomsburg.

Clarence J. Kasales, M.D. - Pennsylvania State College, 1942; Temple University School of Medicine, 1946; United States Navy Medical Corps, July 1943 to July 1949, Lieutenant, junior grade, Flight Surgeon.

Seymour Krevsky, M.D. — Lehigh University, 1942; Jefferson Medical College, 1946; United States Army Medical Corps, July

1943 —, Captain, serving in Japan.

William O. Muehlhauser, M.D. — 12 North Third Street, Quakertown. In Naval Service.

I. Robert Plotnick, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1943; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1946; United States Army Medical Corps, June 1943 —, Captain.

Charles W. Schiffert, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1943; Hahnemann Medical College, 1946; United States Army Medical Corps. Office, Valley Forge General Hospital, Phoenixville. Medical Resident, 1947.

January 6, 1947 to May 26, 1947 Robert H. Clymer, M.D. — 121 Windsor Street, Reading.

April 1, 1947 to June 30, 1948

William R. Dewar, M.D. — California State Teachers College, 1939; University of Pennsylvania, 1943; Hahnemann Medical College, 1947; United States Navy Medical Corps, September 1942 to April 1946, Lieutenant, junior grade. Office, 131 Front Street, Catasauqua.

Carleton Herrick, M.D. - University of Maine; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1944; United States Army Medical Corps, July 1945 to February 1947, Captain. Office, Wescosville. Resident, 1947.

William R. King, M.D. — University of Pennsylvania, 1943; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1947. Senior Assistant Surgeon, United States Public Health Service, Lewisburg.

July 1, 1947 to July lf 1948

Frederick C. Bachman, M.D. — University of Pennsylvania, 1943; George Washington University School of Medicine, 1947; Medical Staff, Hazleton State Hospital. Office, 416 West Maple Street, Hazleton.

Henry H. Fetterman, M.D. — Haverford College, 1944; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1947; United States Navy Medical Corps, September 1943 to December 1945, Lieutenant, junior grade. Resident, 1948-1949.

Robert G. Rhoda, M.D. Deceased.

Haroun Shamai, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1943; Hahnemann Medical College, 1947. Office, Khan Sion Aboudy, Baghdad, Iraq.

September 15, 1948 to July 1, 1949

Dan Oniki, M.D. — University of Utah, 1944; University of Utah School of Medicine, 1947.

RESIDENT STAFF, 1948-1949

Charles D. Schaeffer, M.D. — Haverford College, 1942; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1945. First Assistant Resident in Surgery.

William C. Grasley, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1939; Hahnemann Medical College, 1943; United States Army Medical Corps, March 1942 to July 1946, Captain. Second Assistant Resident in Surgery.

Stanley J. Yamula, M.D. — Pennsylvania State College, 1941; Hahnemann Medical College, 1944; United States Navy Medical Corps, 1944 to 1945, Lieutenant, junior grade. Third Assistant Resident in Surgery.

George W. Thoma, Jr., M.D. — Lafayette College, 1942; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1945; United States Navy Medical Corps, Lieutenant, junior grade. Resident in Pathology.

Henry H. Fetterman, M.D. — Haverford College, 1944; University of Pennsylvania, 1947; United States Navy Medical Corps, September 1943 to December 1945, Lieutenant, junior grade. Medical Resident.

Robert J. Beitel, Jr., M.D., Ph.D. — Pennsylvania State College of Optometry, 1928; Temple University, 1932; Ph.D., Clark University, 1935; Temple University School of Medicine, 1948. Interne.

Donald M. Feigley, M.D. — Lehigh University, 1944; Jefferson Medical College, 1948. Interne.

Robert P. Fenstermacher, Jr., M.D. — Princeton University; Washington University; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1948; United States Army, July 1943 to March 1946, Private first class. Interne.

Gilbert M. Hoffman, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1944; Jefferson Medical College, 1948; United States Naval Reserve, December

1942 to November 1945. Interne.

Kenneth E. Jones, M.D. — Muhlenberg College, 1945; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1948; United States Navy Medical Corps, Reserve, 1941, Lieutenant, junior grade. Interne.

Robert W. Leipold, M.D. — University of California, 1945; University of California School of Medicine, 1948; United States Army, November 1942 to February 1946, Private. Interne.

Dan Oniki, M.D. — University of Utah, 1944; University of Utah School of Medicine, 1947. Interne.

Earl S. Reimer, M.D. — Bucknell University; Ursinus College, 1945; Hahnemann Medical College, 1948; United States Naval Reserve, June 1943 to March 1946. Interne.

George P. Rutt, M.D. — Lebanon Valley College; University of Alabama; West Virginia University; Temple University; Temple University School of Medicine, 1948; United States Army, December 1942 to March 1946, Private. Interne.

Luther R. Zehner, M.D. — Juniata College; Hahnemann Medical College, 1948. Interne.

WILLING HANDS

THE School of Nursing, nearly as old as the Allentown Hospital itself, has been preparing young women — and one young man — for careers in what frequently has been termed “the most noble profession of them all” almost from the day the Hospital opened its doors.

Although the School was not formally organized until November 1899, six months after the opening of the Hospital, two probate nurses were elected to the staff on June 9, 1899. They received some training under Annie B. Gibson, the Hospital’s first Head Nurse, and her assistants, Martha J. Yost and Etta Shoemaker, but neither one was graduated. President Singmaster’s report at the end of the first six months of the Hospital’s operation indicates that there were four probate nurses on the first staff, but the selection of only two of them, Valide Koehler of Bethlehem and Mary E. Adams of Hazleton, is noted in the minutes of the Board of Trustees. Students in the fall of that year, recognized as the first enrolled in the School of Nursing, were Mabel E. Brown, Elsie G. Evans, and Elizabeth Kratz, all of Allentown and the first to be graduated, and Nellie Smith of Easton, who later withdrew from the -School.

Establishment of the School itself was authorized by the Board on October 13, 1899 when Miss Gibson and Dr. C. D. Schaeffer, the Surgeon-in-chief, were directed to provide for its opening early in November. Miss Evans, Miss Kratz, and Miss Smith were students when the action was taken; Miss Brown joined them on October 19, the day the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument was dedicated at Center Square. The School was launched under the supervision of Miss Gibson, but it was under the leadership of Clara V. Haring, who became Head Nurse on January 1, 1900, that its development actually was started.

In its fifty years of service to the Hospital, to the Community, to the State, and to the Nation, the Allentown Hospital School of Nursing has graduated 1,173 nurses thoroughly grounded in the theory and in the practice of their profession. Of the 1,12610 still living, 483 are active professionally across the country in civilian and military hospitals where many hold supervisory posts, in school and community public health programs, in research and in teaching, as aides to physicians and surgeons in their offices, and as private duty nurses on the registers of scores of hospitals. One of them has become a physician, one a medical missionary, and another a dean of women and health director in a liberal arts college. Seven, including the present Director of Nursing at the Allentown Hospital, hold top executive positions in hospitals. Others, among them the present Director of Nursing Education at her Alma Mater, are responsible for the training of new generations to serve in the profession. During World War I, twenty-seven wore the uniform of their country, and in World War II ninety-six served in the Army or Navy Nurse Corps. On each service flag there is one gold star. More than a score have earned advanced degrees and hundreds have taken post-graduate work in hospitals and colleges. The names of 183 are on the active service roster of the Allentown Hospital as members of its supervisory and general duty staffs or available for call through the private duty register. More than 850 of them have carried the training they received into the homes they helped establish.

The mark of an Allentown Hospital nurse and the distinguishing characteristic sought through the years by the School, even though to nurses and faculty alike its origin may be misty, was expressed by Dr. Edward P. Davis, Professor of Obstetrics at Jefferson Medical College, when he spoke to the first graduates at the commencement in the Lyric Theatre on June 13, 1901:

“Wear your profession as you do your uniforms,” he told the three young women who, in their starched white dresses and jaunty little caps, held the center of the stage. “Both are becoming to you, both give you dignity and grace, but neither your uniform nor your profession is you. Your technical work may be perfect, your uniform spotless, but you may be a cold-blooded conscienceless person whom no one loves. Unless the trying experiences of your lives teach you patience, gentleness, and kindness, you cannot win the highest regard of your profession as a nurse.”

The attendance at that commencement was good and “more than ordinary interest was manifested in the proceedings,” The Morning Call reported the following day in its news columns. “The stage was beautified by a profusion of potted plants and flowers. The closest attention was given each number on the program, serving to bring those present to a closer relationship with an institution which has already done so much for the community.” Kling-ler’s orchestra provided the music, and clergymen joined members of the Staff and Board of Trustees in flanking the graduates.

Trustees were justly proud when Dr. Davis, the man who in his day was regarded as one of the most eminent teachers in his field, made this observation:

“We are accustomed to think of a hospital as an institution devoted entirely to the works of charity and mercy in the care of the sick. While this is the great function of a hospital, it has another which is scarcely less important. We are often rewarded for faithful effort in this life by what we learn rather than by what we receive. Many an undertaking has failed to achieve what its proposer hoped and expected, but has yielded experience and information which later yielded great benefit.

In medicine, knowledge and experience are the capital of the nurse as well as of the physician, and any institution which yields this return in addition to the care of the sick performs a double function.”

The three graduates, who still had several months of duty ahead of them to complete the requirements of the two-year course, rode to the ceremonies at the Lyric Theatre behind two horses in the town’s best white-lined bridal coach. With their diplomas in hand, they returned to a gala reception and dinner arranged by the Ladies Auxiliary, the Staff, and the Trustees. Later they exchanged their white uniforms for the pink ones that were standard for student duty, and completed the ministrations to the sick they had started that morning. The Trustee committee that arranged the commencement later reported to the Board that expenses for the occasion were $11.25.

Miss Brown, first honor student of the class and the recipient of the gold medal presented by the Silver Cross Circle of the King’s Daughters, later became head nurse at the Hospital under Miss Haring, but spent most of her active career as a nurse at the Kutztown and Slippery Rock State Teachers Colleges; Miss Evans became Night Supervisor at the Butler County General Hospital; and Miss Kratz engaged in private duty nursing in and around Allentown. Miss Brown and Miss Evans were among the twenty-seven graduates of the institution who served in the first World

War.

Twelve hours of duty in the Hospital, with classwork and study in addition, was a standard practice a half-century ago and, while the number of hours was gradually reduced to provide student nurses with more time for study and for recreation, it was not until 1936 that the present eight-hour day was adopted.

First official announcement of the School was published in the Fifth Annual Report of the Allentown Hospital Association and listed a student body of eight “intelligent and healthy young women of good character, between the ages of 20 and 30.” It pointed out that “a course of theoretical and practical instruction covering two years” had been established “for the purpose of training women to become professional nurses.” Subjects taught by Miss Haring and members of the Hospital Staff included Surgical Nursing, Hygiene and Sanitation, Materia Medica, Bacteriology, Maternity Nursing, and General Nursing.

Four years later, in the report for the year ending December 31,

1904, this description was given:

“A course in practical and theoretical nursing, covering a period of two years and six months, divided into two terms, has been established for the purpose of training women for professional nursing.

“Daily lectures and demonstrations are given for a period of nine months during each year.

“The studies of the Junior year comprise lectures upon Anatomy, Physiology, Hygiene, Pharmacy, General Medical and Surgical Nursing with demonstrations in bandaging, splinting, and practical nursing.

“During the Senior year lectures are delivered upon Special Medical, Surgical, Gynecological and Obstetrical Nursing, Therapeutics and Toxicology, Nursing and Hygiene of Children, Pathology, Hygiene and Sanitation, Massage and Dietetics.

“Demonstrations are given in special nursing and the examination of urine. A special course is given in Invalid Cookery with daily practical work for one month, by a graduate of Invalid Cookery of the Drexel Institute.

“Women of good character between the ages of twenty-one and thirty years are eligible. Entrance examinations to determine the mental qualifications of applicants are held at such times as may be necessary. Applicants presenting diplomas from colleges or schools are not required to participate in these examinations. A period of probation of two months must be served before the application can be accepted.”

The School continued substantially under these rules and with few changes in curriculum or policy until 1912, when the three-year training course was instituted. During the first thirteen years, increases in enrollment were recorded almost annually until a peak of thirty-two students was reached in 1911. The enrollment was forty-seven when the three-year course was started and reached an all-time high of 202 in 1946. In 1913, when the last thirty-month class was graduated, and when the nurse’s cap that is worn now was adopted as emblematic of the Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, seventeen nurses received diplomas. Under the two-year and the two-and-one-half-year curricula, 105 student nurses completed their training in the School. Because of the transition to the three-year program, there was no commencement in 1914. The following year fifteen diplomas were awarded. The largest class in the history of the School of Nursing, seventy-two young women, are members of the group completing their requirements for graduation during the Golden Anniversary year.

In a community that has two liberal arts colleges whose faculties and trustees also are interested in the Allentown Hospital and its School of Nursing, standards are certain to be high. As a result, graduates of the School have met the requirements of the State Board of Nursing since examinations were first given more than thirty-five years ago. The School, with standards that exceed the minimum for Pennsylvania and that permit its graduates to take examinations in every state in the United States, has been accredited by the Department of Public Instruction of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania since 1913. It also meets the requirements of the American Red Cross Nursing Service. In January 1942, it was among the first four schools in Pennsylvania to be approved by the United States Public Health Service for training nurses under the program through which the Federal Government sought to meet the increasing demands of the armed forces, the Veterans Administration, and civilian hospitals and services. During the three and one half years the Cadet Training program was in operation, 270 students of the School of Nursing were enrolled in the Cadet Nursing Corps and the government paid the Hospital $75,065 for their education and their maintenance.

The present three-year curriculum requires 1,232 hours of formal classroom instruction and 1,095 days of theoretical and practical training. First year students study Anatomy and Physiology, Chemistry, Micro-biology, Pharmacology, Principles of Nursing, Nutrition and Cookery, Professional Adjustments, Diet Therapy, Medical and Surgical Nursing, Psychology, Sociology, and Introduction to Medical Science. Second year courses include Medical and Surgical Nursing Specialties, Communicable Diseases, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry. Senior classes are centered about the study of Diseases of the Nervous System, Diseases of the Special Senses, Public Sanitation, the History of Nursing, an advanced course in Professional Adjustments, and Advanced Nursing, which includes emergencies. Every graduate of the Allentown Hospital School of Nursing has at least 154 days of practical experience in medical nursing, 140 in surgical nursing, fifty-six in operating room techniques, ninety-one each on the pediatric service and in obstetrics, forty-two in the diet kitchen, ninety-one days in psychiatric nursing at the Allentown State Homeopathic Hospital, twenty-eight days each in the Out-patient Department and in the Department of Contagious Diseases, seven days in physio-therapy, and thirty-five days on private floors.

Through an affiliation with Cedar Crest College in a cooperative five-year nursing course, started in 1942, students have the opportunity of earning both a diploma in nursing from the School of Nursing and a bachelor of science degree from the liberal arts college which is accredited by the Pennsylvania Department of Public Instruction and by the Middle States Association of Colleges. Under the program, a student spends her first and second years at Cedar Crest College, another Allentown institution, and the remaining three years in the School of Nursing, receiving both her Nursing School diploma and her College degree upon the successful completion of the five-year requirements. It also is possible to take the two years of academic work at Cedar Crest after graduating from the School of Nursing.

From the time the School of Nursing was established until the first full-time instructor was named in 1920, instruction of student nurses was the responsibility of the Director of Nurses, members of the Hospital Staff, and graduate nurses who shared teaching duties with their normal work in the Hospital. Members of the faculties of Muhlenberg College and Cedar Crest College also served on the faculty of the School and still are called upon for special lectures and services. Today’s faculty includes forty-two supervisors, head nurses, instructors, and assistant head nurses, eleven of whom spend the major part of their time teaching in classrooms, in the modern laboratories, in the wards, in the diet kitchens, and in the specialized departments of the Hospital where students are assigned to clinical service. Lectures in their respective fields also are given by twenty-five members of the Major Staff of the Hospital. Although the School is under the supervision of the Director of Nursing, the educational program is the direct responsibility of the Director of Nursing Education, a new position created by the Board of Trustees in June 1948 and assigned to Adele M. Miller of the Class of 1922. Miss Miller has devoted her full time to teaching and administrative work in the School since 1923, first as an instructor and later as Assistant Director of Nursing Education.

Of the eight women who as directors of nursing have been in charge of the School and of the nursing services in the Hospital, three have been its own graduates: Alma Viehdorfer, later Mrs. Alma Samuels, who served from December 13, 1912 until October 1923; Ada I. Snyder, who was elected November 14, 1923 and who resigned in December 1930; and Ethlyn Eichel, named Director in June 1948.

Miss Gibson, who opened the Hospital and organized its first nursing service, was a graduate of the old Blockley Hospital Training School in Philadelphia, now the school of nursing affiliated with the Philadelphia General Hospital. With her staff of two assistants and four students, she cared for an average of twelve patients daily and on the Hospital’s busiest day counted twenty-one occupied beds. She also held the title of Matron and was responsible for many of the administrative functions in the Hospital. Her salary, the minutes of the Board of Trustees reveal, was thirty dollars per month.

Clara V. Haring, who succeeded her in January 1900 and served until she resigned to retire in the summer of 1912, was elected at a salary of forty dollars per month. She saw the Hospital expand to the point at which it was admitting nearly 1,500 patients in a year and caring for eighty-seven per day. Recognized as the Superintendent and Matron, she was associated with Dr. C. D. Schaeffer in the administration of the Hospital and the supervision of its employes. The School of Nursing, developed under her leadership, graduated eighty-eight nurses before she retired from active duty. She was a graduate of the training school of the University of Pennsylvania Hospital.

For a few months before Alma Viehdorfer was promoted to the position of Directress of Nursing, a new title which she was the first to assume, Mary Schaneman served as superintendent. During Miss Viehdorfer’s eleven years as head of the nursing service and the School of Nursing, the Hospital admitted approximately 25,000 patients, a daily average of as high as 156 being under the care of the nurses she directed. It was also during her term that the Harvey Memorial building was opened as the home for nurses and the center of their training program. A graduate of the School with the Class of 1907, she presented diplomas to 150 nurses who completed their training under her direction.

Although Miss Snyder, a classmate of Miss Viehdorfer, served only seven years, more than 30,000 patients were admitted in that period and 174 nurses were graduated from the Training School. Martin Levine, the only male nurse to be graduated from the School, completed his work during her term, receiving his diploma with the Class of 1925. She directed the increases in the nursing service that became necessary when the Hospital opened the service building in 1927 and the new west wing in 1928 to expand its capacity to 385 beds.

Anna R. Kay, a graduate of the Training School of the Orthopedic Hospital of Philadelphia, became Director of Nursing in March 1931, a year in which the Hospital admitted 5,635 patients. When she resigned in 1936, it was admitting 6,599, caring for an average of 234 a day with a high of 320 beds occupied at one time. Expansion meant more nurses and more housing for them and, shortly after she began her duties, the Reichenbach Memorial on the southwest corner of Seventeenth and Chew Streets was cleared as an isolation unit and became a residence for student nurses. During her five years of service, the School graduated 178 nurses. She inaugurated the policy of adding graduate nurses to the staff for general duty to relieve student nurses of some of their responsibilities and give them more time for study and relaxation. The first general duty nurses were named in 1934. There were seventy-six on the staff at the beginning of 1949.

Her successor, E. Louise Grant, a graduate of the University of Minnesota who came to Allentown from her position as Director of Nurses at Mercy Hospital in Altoona, served a few months longer than two years, from January 1936 to June 1938. But in that period, the Hospital’s admissions increased at the rate of 500 each year and an average of 275 patients were her daily responsibility. Three classes, a total of eighty nurses, were graduated during her administration and, in 1936, a home for graduate nurses was opened. She resigned her position to become Director of Nurses at the Temple University School of Nursing.

May L. Crouch, a graduate of the University of Cincinnati and a former Director of Nurses at Henrotin Hospital in Chicago, came to the Allentown Hospital in July 1938 and served until May 1948, completing just ten years. Her administration was complicated both by the unprecedented demands for hospital service and by the insistent war-time calls for nurses for military service and for duty in expanded war industries. Hospital admissions during that period increased from 8,000 a year in 1939 to nearly 14,000 a year with a daily average of 400 in 1946 and a record-shattering high of 495 on a single day in 1947. Enrollment in the School of Nursing, sharply expanded by the organization of the Cadet Nurses Corps under Federal subsidy, reached a peak of 202, and 483 student nurses were graduated. Crowded conditions in the Harvey and Reichenbach Memorials were relieved by the purchase of a residence at 1550 Chew Street in 1943 and by adding a fourth floor to the Harvey building. In directing the work of the expanded nursing and training program, Miss Crouch had the active assistance of Adele Miller, Assistant Director of Nursing Education, and of Ethlyn Eichel, Assistant Director of Nursing Service. Nursing duties during the days of acute shortages also were shared by Nurses Aides, volunteers recruited by the Lehigh County Chapter of the American Red Cross and trained by Alma Urffer of the Hospital Staff. Between February 9, 1942 and January 1945, the 228 Nurses Aides contributed 64,549 hours of service relieving student and graduate nurses of some of their routine chores. Graduates who had been inactive for a number of years returned to serve in the Hospital on full or split shifts to assist in periods of emergency.

Best evidence of the growth of the Hospital and the expansion of its services is to be found in a comparison of the staff that assisted Miss Gibson when the Hospital was opened in 1899 and the group associated with Miss Eichel when she began her duties in June 1948. Miss Gibson had two assistant trained nurses and four students; under the supervision of Miss Eichel, Director of Nursing, Adele Miller, Director of Nursing Education, and Marie Miller, Assistant Director of Nursing Service, are 130 graduate nurses who are full-time employes of the Hospital, 185 student nurses, and seventy-five nurses who regularly are assigned to private duty. Miss Eichel was graduated from the School she now directs in 1930. Before returning to her Alma Mater in 1936, she was Educational Director and Assistant Director of Nurses at the Citizens General Hospital in New Kensington.

Development of the Hospital and the increasing acceptance of its services inevitably created a demand for more nurses and the facilities to house and train them. The problem has been a recurring one through the fifty years. The original Hospital building provided quarters for nurses on the top floor. Those facilities were expanded when the Mosser Wing was occupied in 1902, but soon became inadequate once again. Temporary accommodations were provided in a rented home on North West Street and in a residence at 1611 Chew Street purchased in 1910 for $6,500. Of the purchase price, the Ladies Auxiliary paid $4,400. In 1912, when the east wing was completed with quarters for fifty-five nurses, they again were returned to Hospital buildings and remained there until the Harvey Memorial was occupied late in 1915.

Judge Edward Harvey, for whom the building is named and whose bequest of $106,000 to the Hospital provided half of the funds for its construction, advocated a home for nurses, separate from the Hospital, from the time he became President of the Board of Trustees in 1902 until his death in 1913. In his report for the year ending December 31, 1907 he said:

“We have twenty-four pupil nurses. These young ladies have been accepted after careful examination, and are thoroughly taught both the theory and the practice of nursing. It is to be regretted that they must occupy rooms in the Hospital building needed for patients and unfit for nurses. They cannot get the rest and quiet they so much need. They have not ample facilities for study and none for recreation. For several years I have been urging on the public to assist us in building a Nurses’ Home and Training School. It will require more than the management can command unless a debt is put on the institution. So many hospitals in the country have floundered and failed under the incubus of debt, that we have decided to create no debt. If kind friends and a generous public, appreciating the good work done within the Hospital, will not come forward with the necessary money, we will be compelled to endure present discomforts.”

Earlier, when the vacant plot of ground at the southeast corner of Seventeenth and Chew Streets was available, Judge Harvey advocated its purchase as the ultimate site for a nurses’ home. It was acquired in May 1903 for $4,500, paid for in part by a $2,500 legacy the Hospital had received from the Estate of Lewis J. Hel-frich, and in part through a gift of $1,250 from George Albright, one of those from whom it was purchased.

Judge Harvey’s high regard for nurses and particularly for the School of Nursing of the Allentown Hospital, again was expressed in December 1912 in his last report as President of the Board:

“The Nurses’ Training School is the most important adjunct of the Hospital,” he wrote. “Through it we receive competent applicants who in the course of their studies reside in the buildings and assist in the care and treatment of the patients. They are required to pursue a prescribed course of study and are taught practically how to care for and treat those in their charge. After pursuing the prescribed curriculum they are graduated as trained nurses and receive certificates which entitle them under the law to pursue their humane vocation. You could not dispense with their services, unless their places were filled with graduate nurses. This would entail a vast expenditure of money. It is the aim of the management to set and maintain a high standard of study for these young ladies. It is our boast that all of the graduates have reflected honor on the institution, and many of them now occupy high positions in the charitable institutions of this and other states.”

Judge Harvey’s will bequeathed one-third of his Estate, a share that ultimately totalled $106,000, to the endowment fund of the Hospital and provided that $50,000 of that amount could be used for permanent improvements. Although there was no specific direction in the will, Trustees believed that in permitting $50,000 of his bequest to be used for permanent improvements, Judge Harvey had in mind the construction of the nurses’ home. This he had advocated through the years. On July 10, 1914, after the Hospital Association had received the first $47,500 from the Harvey Estate, the Trustees directed its architects, Ruhe and Lange, to prepare plans for the building, and solicited bids. There was some hesitation about proceeding with construction because the east wing, completed in 1912, left the Hospital with a building fund debt of $56,000. However, in September, Dr. C. D. Schaeffer and Mayor A. L. Reichenbach, both enthusiastically in favor of immediate construction, offered to bring in assured subscriptions of $25,000 within ten days, to be credited on the existing debt, on condition that the contract for the erection of the nurses’ home would then be awarded. On October 14, they reported subscriptions of $20,100, later raised to $33,600, and the contract was awarded to the Ochs Construction Company. The building was erected at a cost of $96,775 and furnished by friends who contributed $14,960. It was dedicated on December 23, 1915 at ceremonies at which the speakers were: former President William Howard Taft; Dr. J. Chalmer DaCosta, Professor of Surgery at Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia; Judge J. Henry Williams of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania; Dr. George T. Ettinger, Dean of Muhlenberg College; and Dr. C. D. Schaeffer.

Reviewing the development of hospitals and the history of the nursing profession, ex-President Taft said:

“The profession of nursing has attracted many women of high and low degree. It is a democratizing pursuit. The uni-

formity of the nurses’ dresses is typical of the level upon which all stand when they take their positions at the bedside. To be a good nurse, one should have considerable physical strength, good temper, clear intelligence, and a strong sense of duty. The issue as to whether women are adapted to be good nurses is recurring, but the number of them and their wide use are a sufficient answer. It is true that in the course of her work, the female nurse may find as a necessary part of her duty menial and disagreeable service, which she would fain avoid.

It may at first jar her nerves of delicacy and be a shock. But it is wonderful how utterly impersonal and anatomical such duties become in the routine of a nurse’s life. The training of a nurse in the soothing graces of life, the neat uniform, the attitude of kindly helpfulness, her youth and often her good looks, as well as the informality of her relation to the physicians in attendance, lead to her leaving her profession for matrimony. The inroads upon it are not enough, however, to give us real concern. Trained nurses have greatly added to woman’s opportunity to be independent and earn her livelihood. This is of itself an important benefit from the development of the profession. One of the real injustices from which women have suffered in the past has been the employments to which they have been limited. They have through Normal Schools flooded the market for female teachers and have forced down their compensation and have not in fact improved the quality of teaching. The absence of a choice of a means of earning a respectable livelihood forces many women into matrimony without due regard to their future happiness, and increases the chances of their domestic infelicity.

“The benefit that this school confers on the immediate neighborhood is direct and unmistakable, both in offering a professional career to your young women who have a taste for it and in introducing into this city and the neighboring towns members of a most useful profession.”

And Dr. DaCosta, speaking along somewhat similar lines but from the background of his own professional experience in hospitals) had this to say:

“The modern trained nurse is the surgeon’s right hand. But a few years ago she did not exist. Thirty years ago when I served my term as resident physician in a huge hospital, the attempt to introduce trained nurses was just being made in Philadelphia. The nursing at Blockley was fifty-fifty — in part by trained nurses, in part by representatives of the fine old Mrs. Gamp and Mrs. Prig schools. It did not take me long to decide as to the side where my sympathies belonged.

“The old timers, as a class (although there were brilliant exceptions), were ignorant, callous, and indifferent, frequently dirty and not unusually drunk. All they knew was what had been picked up haphazardly in a sordid experience and much

First Class to be Graduated from the School of Nursing — 1901 Clara Haring, Directress; Elizabeth Kratz, Mabel E. Brown, Elsie G. Evans.

and a Few Members of the Class of 1951 In a School of Nursing Laboratory

that they knew was not true. They were ignorant of drugs, cleanliness, practically ignorant of everything, sometimes even of humanity.

“The newcomers were young ladies with high ideals and earnest purposes. They were ruled by conscience. They were educated, were being carefully taught their profession, were dainty, tender, and charming. They worked rapidly and certainly, without noise or hurry. They knew what was wanted and how to have it ready. They worked not only with their hands, but also with their brains and hearts. They watched their patients through the long hours with the calm self-reliance and confidence which bore a message of hope, with the knowledge that at once detected a change for the better or for the worse, with a tenderness that helped to blunt the very arrows of anguish.

“Such I found the trained nurse then. Ever since, my respect for her and confidence in her have increased. She is an absolutely necessary part of a hospital. You can’t run a hospital without her. An institution with a training school has given bonds to have first class nurses. I do not dare to stand here and counsel the young ladies of the Training School. But I do bow in respectful admiration to those who devote their lives to this most useful calling. The Allentown Hospital does well to house them so worthily, as we see it is about to do.”

What appeared to be ample in 1915 was outgrown by 1931. Provision was then made for housing the increasing student body and nursing staff by moving the contagious disease department to the main Hospital buildings and using the vacated Reichenbach Memorial as a residence for student nurses. Five years later the John Danner property at 224 North Seventeenth Street was purchased for $15,200 and established as a home for graduate nurses. The building is known as the Knerr Memorial because it was purchased with funds from the residuary estate of Katie E. Knerr, whose husband, Harvey E. Knerr, was a Trustee of the Hospital from 1920 until his death in 1934.

A continued demand for additional accommodations for nurses was met by adding the fourth floor to the Harvey Memorial. Construction, authorized in October 1938 and completed the following year, cost $56,212. Another home at 1550 Chew Street has been used since 1943.

Again, as the Hospital observes its fiftieth anniversary contemplating the additions that will give the community a modern institution with more than 500 beds and 50 bassinets, a complete diagnostic clinic and health center, and all the necessary service adjuncts, additional housing for nurses to care for the increased patient load is a paramount need. The Harvey Memorial will be enlarged by the erection of four wings that will increase its capacity from 129 student nurses to 246 students and fourteen supervisors and at the same time provide necessary classrooms, demonstration areas, and offices. It is the hope of the Hospital Trustees that each of these wings, like the other units of the School, will find sponsors who will appreciate their lasting value as memorials to friends and to families.

An important factor in advancing the standards of the profession, in developing the School, and in building the Hospital has been the Alumnae Association of the School of Nursing, a group that has been active since it was organized September 16, 1903. Since 1917, the organization and its members have been affiliated with the Graduate Nurses’ Association of Pennsylvania, now the Pennsylvania State Nurses’ Association; since 1919 it has been a part of the American Nurses’ Association. It has been officially represented at two sessions of the International Congress of Nurses, by Lillian W. Pickel in 1929 and by Ethlyn Eichel in 1947. It assisted in entertaining the conventions of the Pennsylvania State Nurses’ Association in 1930 and provided funds to help bring nurses from foreign countries to the International Congress in 1947.

The organization, founded by seven charter members of the twelve eligible graduates, elected Elizabeth Kratz, a member of the original graduating class, as its first President. Other officers included Jennie Mitchell, Vice-president; Amy Otto, Secretary; and Mabel Brown, Treasurer. Charter members, in addition to the officers, were Anna P. Williams, Bessie E. Scanlin, and Katherine Coyle. The first regular meeting was held on October 12, 1903. For some years the growing group met in the temporary nurses’ home at 1611 Chew Street, where the Alumnae furnished the parlor as one of their first gifts, later at the homes of members, and finally in the Harvey Memorial Nurses’ Home.

One of the Association’s early moves to support the Hospital and at the same time serve its members was taken in 1911 when it furnished a room in the new east wing and developed a fund for its maintenance with the proviso that if any member of the Association became ill, she was to be given hospitalization without charge. As membership increased, making it impractical to carry out the stipulation, a compromise was effected under which members of the Alumnae Association, unmarried and in active practice, were given a one-third reduction on hospital bills. In 1915 the Association spent $1,000 to furnish the library and reception room in the new nurses’ home; in 1924, purchased a pneumograph and other hospital equipment at a cost of $267; in 1926, pledged $5,000 toward the Hospital building fund campaign that resulted in the erection of the service building and the west wing; in 1928, furnished a sun parlor in the west wing; and in 1944, gave $1,500 to the building fund campaign then current. Other cash gifts have been given to the Hospital regularly each year, and contributions to the School have been applied to purchases of books for the School’s library, lamps for the library, a mimeograph machine, projection equipment for classrooms, a skeleton, and other teaching aids. They generously support the Community Chest, the Red Cross, the Lehigh County Tuberculosis and Health Society, and other appeals. The Association was active in bringing about the introduction of the eight-hour day for private duty nurses, effective at the Allentown Hospital since April 1945. It honored the memory of two of its members who lost their lives in military service when it planted dogwood trees along Pennsylvania’s Blue Star Memorial Drive in the names of Anna Marie McMullen, who died in World War I, and Lieutenant Dorothy Berger, who died in service in New Guinea during World War II. It contributed $100 for the American Nurses’ Memorial in France and supported the many war-time appeals for emergency assistance by approved groups and agencies.

The Alumnae Association is responsible for the indoctrination of new students with the ideals of the School, sponsors social functions for its members and for students, presents a gift to each member of the graduating class, entertains at the various affairs of Homecoming Day, arranges educational programs and discussions, and works for constant improvement of the standards of the profession and those who are associated with it.

Through the years it has been one of the several stabilizing factors in the development of the School, a force in linking those active in the profession with those who are preparing for it. The Allentown Hospital Association counts its Alumnae Association as one of its important assets.

THE FACULTY Ethlyn L. Eichel, B.S., M.A., Director of Nursing

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1938; M.A., Lehigh University, 1946; appointed to staff, 1936.

Adele M. Miller, B.S., M.A., Director of Nursing Education Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., Lehigh University, 1946; appointed to staff, 1923.

Marie S. Miller, Assistant Director of Nursing Service

Kutztown State Teachers College, 1923; Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1928; appointed to staff, 1931.

Alma M. Urffer, B.S., Nursing Arts Instructor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; B.S., Columbia University, 1938; appointed to staff, 1938.

Thelma C. Harding, B.S., M.A., Medical Teaching Supervisor Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1933; B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1943; M.A., Lehigh University, 1945; appointed to staff, 1934.

A. Louise Harding, B.S., Surgical Teaching Supervisor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1941; B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1948; appointed to staff, 1941.

Marguerite K. Reiter, B.S., in Ed., Pediatric Teaching Supervisor

and Supervisor of Pediatric Department

Lankenau Hospital School of Nursing, 1933; B.S., in Ed., Muhlenberg College, 1947; Children’s Hospital, Pittsburgh, 1933; appointed to staff, 1937.

Ora Phillips, Obstetrical Teaching Supervisor and Supervisor of

the Obstetrical Department

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1936; University of Pennsylvania, Muhlenberg College, Lehigh University, Kutztown State Teachers College; appointed to staff, 1936.

Doris P. Leh, B.S., Assistant Science Instructor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1948; B.S., Cedar Crest College, 1948; appointed to staff, 1948.

Anne Oral, Assistant Science Instructor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1941; appointed to staff,

1941.

Jeanette B. K. Silfies, Assistant Nursing Arts Instructor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1944; Muhlenberg College; appointed to staff, 1944.

Julia O. Fidorack, Assistant Nursing Arts Instructor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1944; appointed to staff,

1944.

Catherine H. Shinton, B.S., Assistant Surgical Teaching Supervisor School of Nursing, Jefferson Medical College Hospital, 1945; B.S., Cedar Crest College, 1948; appointed to staff, 1947.

Catherine L. Nelson, B.S., Assistant Medical Teaching Supervisor B.S., University of Rochester, 1940; appointed to staff, 1948.

Elizabeth E. Long, B.S., Teaching Dietitian

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1947; Harper Hospital, Detroit, Michigan; appointed to staff, 1947.

Edith A. Dout, Operating Room Supervisor and Instructor in

Operating Room Technique.

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1917; University of Pennsylvania; Muhlenberg College; Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston; appointed to staff, 1917.

Edith D. Reichardt, Ancesthetist and Instructor in Aneesthesia Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1922; Muhlenberg College; appointed to staff, 1922.

Mary L. Peters, A.B., Chief Dietitian

A.B., Southwestern College, 1926; interne, Wesley Hospital, Wichita, Kansas; appointed to staff, 1929.

Marie H. Smith, Afternoon Supervisor

Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, New York City, 1915; appointed to staff, 1941.

Agnes S. Edmondson, Afternoon Supervisor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1938; appointed to staff,

1943.

Josephine E. Mitchell, Night Supervisor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1947; appointed to staff,

1947.

Hazel L. Benner, Night Supervisor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1948; appointed to staff,

1948.

Charlotte N. Cordes, Afternoon Supervisor

Sacred Heart Hospital School of Nursing, 1941; appointed to staff, 1948.

Lillian W. Pickel, Head Nurse, Out-patient Department

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1919; University of Pennsylvania; appointed to staff, 1924.

Alice K. Helfrich, Head Nurse, Semi-private floor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1910; University of Pennsylvania; appointed to staff, 1929.

Virginia M. Minor, Head Nurse, Women’s Surgical Ward

Cooper Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 1931; appointed to staff, 1946.

Minnie E. Ginder, Head Nurse, Semi-private floor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1920; appointed to staff, 1942.

June B. Leh, Head Nurse, Men’s Surgical Ward

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1941; appointed to staff,

1942.

Dorothy J. Dengler, B.S., Head Nurse, Private Obstetrical floor Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1943; B.S., Cedar Crest College, 1946; appointed to staff, 1946.

Marie A. Edelman, Head Nurse, Private Obstetrical floor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1944; appointed to staff, 1946.    r

Martha A. Vacendak, Head Nurse, Women’s Medical Ward Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1946; appointed to staff,

1946.    r

Janis B. Geidner, Head Nurse, Private floor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1947; appointed to staff,

1947.

Doris B. Spengler, Head Nurse, Male Surgical Ward

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1947; appointed to staff, 1947.

Lucille A. Albright, Head Nurse, Isolation Section

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1947; appointed to staff,

1947.

Catherine E. Anglestein, Head Nurse, Obstetrical Ward

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1946; appointed to staff,

1948.

Helen R. Burger, Head Nurse, Women's Surgical Ward

Edward J. Meyer Memorial Hospital, Buffalo, 1939; University of Buffalo; appointed to staff, 1948.

Anne R. Kistler, Head Nurse, Male Medical Ward

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1947; appointed to staff, 1948.

Nadine E. Moyer, Head Nurse, Private floor

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; appointed to staff, 1948.

Margaret T. Biery, Head Nurse, Solution Room

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1932; appointed to staff, 1947.

Magdalene M. Jones, Head Nurse, Health Office

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1947; appointed to staff,

1947.

Ethel R. Butz, Assistant Head Nurse, Delivery Rooms

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; University of Pennsylvania; appointed to staff, 1937.

Alvera G. Heffner, Assistant Head Nurse, Semi-private floor Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1947; appointed to staff,

1948.

Ruth N. Lehman, Assistant Head Nurse, Nurseries

Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1939; Cook County Hospital, Chicago; appointed to staff, 1948.

Ethel A. Shay, Assistant Head Nurse, Out-patient Department Allentown Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; University of Pennsylvania, Muhlenberg College; appointed to staff, 1926.

Eleanor M. Anderson, B.S., Private Tray Dietitian

B.S., Women’s College of the University of North Carolina, 1945; appointed to staff, 1948.

Edith M. Iffland, B.S., Assistant Dietitian

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1935; Philadelphia General Hospital; appointed to staff, 1942.

Betty T. Persley, B.S., Therapeutic Dietitian

B.S., Marywood College, 1944; University of Pennsylvania Graduate Hospital; appointed to staff, 1946.

Ruth Ella Barnett, B.Sc., Pharmacist

B.Sc., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, 1936; Institute of Hospital Pharmacy, University of Michigan; appointed to staff, 1946.

THE GRADUATES11

1901

Mabel Evelyn BROWN, 628 North Penn Street, Allentown. Post graduate work, Boston Floating Hospital, Boston, Mass.; Army Nurse Corps, October 1, 1918 to August 8, 1920.

Elsie Gertrude EVANS, 6809 Emlen Street, Philadelphia. Army Nurse Corps, September 27, 1918 to August 7, 1919; private duty.

Elizabeth KRATZ. Deceased.

1902

Stella Josephine ALLAN, Maine Street, P.O. Box 155, North Woodbury, Conn.

Mabelle CRISSEY Morgan. Deceased.

Caroline DIEHL Ramsay, 1129 Hamilton Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Children’s Hospital, Philadelphia, and Orthopedic Hospital, Philadelphia.

Jennie MITCHELL. Deceased.

Anna WILLIAMS McLaughlin. Deceased.

1903

Katherine COYLE O’Donnell (Mrs. J. C.), 27 Carlisle Street, Wilkes Barre.

Maybelle KLECKNER Shipman. Deceased.

Amey OTTO. Deceased.

Bessie SCANLIN Muschlitz. Deceased.

1904

Anna CHAMITZ Rasch (Mrs. G. R.)

Bertha CRAIG German (Mrs. Leon)

Anna HOFFMAN Graeber (Mrs. William N.), 109 E. Peace Street, Canton, Miss. Private duty.

May C. HOWARD. Deceased.

Lotta HUNT Hunter (Mrs. J. A.), 117 N. Grand Avenue, Tucson, Arizona. Private duty.

Cora KURTZ Long (Mrs. Eugene E.), 2440 Allen Street, Allentown.

Annie SCHAEFFER Hertz (Mrs. William J.), 2533 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Aida Louisa SCHMOYER, 142 North 10th Street, Allentown. Private duty.

1905

Jeannette FLUCK Freed (Mrs. C. William), 800 Broad Street, Quakertown.

Ida LONGENBACH Graver, 1840 Woodlawn Street, Allentown. Operating room supply room, Allentown Hospital.

Ella HERBEIN Diefenderfer (Mrs. M. L.), Bechtelsville.

Mabel KEIPER Baily (Mrs. Paul), 82 Wentz Street, Tiffin, Ohio.

Elsie HESS, 742 High Street, Bethlehem.

Clara SCHMEHL Walker (Mrs. Harry), 623 15th Avenue, Bethlehem.

Harriet WEAVER Bettencourt, 55 Meadbrook Road, White Plains, N. Y.

1906

Myrtle BAKER Fresher (Mrs. Fred), Cedar Street, Langhorne, Route 3, Siles.

Maime BENFORD Sterner (Mrs. Arthur), 33 Seminary Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y.

Florence DENGLER Mumbauer (Mrs. Frank C.), 1722 Maple Street, Bethlehem.

Mabel KAUFMAN Webb, 23 Rundel Park, Rochester, N. Y. Graduate work, Columbia University, New York University, and New York School of Social Work; Area Supervisor of Medical Social Work, New York State Department of Social Welfare.

Estelle REED Hile (Mrs. G. R.), Route 2, Sunbury. General duty, Community Hospital.

1907

Elsie Eunice BLODGETT, 509 West Union Boulevard, Bethlehem.

Ethel JARDELLA

Stella LEVAN Ditzler (Mrs. Robert), 919 North 10th Street, Reading. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania and Albright College; staff nurse, Visiting Nurse Association of Reading and Berks County, Reading.

Bertha MUELLER Jockinson (Mrs. Henry)

Ada Irene SNYDER, 884 Third Street, Fullerton. Graduate work, Simmons College and Duke University; director of nurses, Tuomey Hospital, Sumter, S. C.; Army Nurse Corps, World War I, twenty-one months; director of nurses, Allentown Hospital, October 1923 to December 1930.

Minnie SELIG. Deceased.

Alma VIEHDORFER Samuels

Director of Nurses, Allentown Hospital, December 1912 to October 1923.

Jane WILLIAMS Chiaffarelli (Mrs. A.), 2564 Paulding Avenue, Bronx, N. Y.

Mary WOOLNEDGE Holt (Mrs. M. L.). Deceased.

1908

Anna Lavinia CAMPBELL, 3235 Powelton Avenue, Philadelphia. General duty, Rush Hospital.

Rose ETZEL Ray (Mrs. Milton S.), 609 Arballo Drive, San Francisco, Calif. President, treasurer, and director, Ray Oil Burner Co., San Francisco, Calif, and Jersey City, N. J.

Fannie Ellen FEATHERMAN, 13 Lincoln Avenue, Endicott, N. Y.

Elizabeth GROLLER Matl (Mrs. M. J.), 136 19th Street, N., St. Petersburg, Fla.

Bertha Mabel HEIN, 125 North Penn Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Lutheran Training School, Baltimore, Md.; college nurse and Assistant Dean of Women, Susquehanna University, Selins-grove.

Mary HELLER Day (Mrs. Harry), 86 Van Nuss Road, Belmont, Mass.

Matilda HORN Notbohm (Mrs. DeLou R.), 105 Clarence Street, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. Post-graduate work, Elizabeth Steele Magee Hospital, Pittsburgh; Army Nurse Corps, February 1918 to June 1919, Croix-de-Guerre with Star.

Sara Jane NEWHART, 210 East Walker Street, Upper Sandusky, Ohio.

Ada UNDERCOFLER Scholl, Lumber Street, Green Lane. General nursing, Pottstown Hospital.

1909

Edith BRECK Pierce (Mrs. James). Deceased.

Mabel RABERT Jordan (Mrs. Lloyd)

Pearl REED Canning (Mrs. Austin J.), New York State Rehabilitation Hospital, West Haverstraw, N. Y. Post-graduate work, Municipal Hospital, Philadelphia; civilian nurse with U. S. Military Forces in Hawaii, December 7, 1941 to March 1942.

Louise Julia TRITSCHLER, 1048 Tilghman Street, Allentown.

1910

Carrie BELZNER Boyer (Mrs. Frank), 318 West Packer Avenue, Bethlehem.

Gertrude BRENSINGER Kirlin (Mrs. John O.), 1400 S.W. 16th Street, Miami, Fla. Cashier, Riverside Hospital.

Lulu ERDMAN Singmaster (Mrs. J. Walter), 101 East Main Street, Macungie.

Alice H. HELFRICH, 532i/£ North 15th Street, Allentown. Head nurse, Allentown Hospital.

Elmira Rufena HIESTAND, 109 North Sixth Street, Allentown. Graduate work, New York Medical College Hospital for Women.

Lulu HELLER Hess (Mrs. J. M.), 3000 McGee Avenue, Philadelphia.

Florence LEBENGOOD Hope (Mrs. Ashley E.), Box 122, Gerry, N. Y. Private duty, W. C. A. Hospital, Jamestown, N. Y.

Lillian MUSCHLITZ Kannapel (Mrs. Harry C.), 360 North Fifth Street, Lehighton.

Anna REINERT Reinhard (Mrs. Harvey), 20 South Fourth Street, Coplay.

Tulia SCHAFFER Fowler (Mrs. Clifford), Route 1, Belvidere, N.J.

Mamie WAIDELICH. Deceased.

Margaret WILLIAMS Bower (Mrs. John E.). Deceased.

Irene WUCHTER Thomas (Mrs. George E.), 12S0 Chew Street, Allentown.

1911

Mary BIGONY Minner (Mrs. Howard). Deceased.

Laura FRITCH Benson (Mrs. E. H.), 1 West Overlea Avenue, Baltimore, Md.

Emily HARLOR Ritter (Mrs. Milton H. N.), 224 North 12th Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Kathryn JOHNSON Schneller (Mrs. John S.), 534 Second Street, Catasauqua.

Roxie KING Rea (Mrs. David), 411 North Chestnut Street, Scott-dale.

Helen MULLIN Houser (Mrs. Joseph), 7224 Calvin Road, Upper Darby.

Carrie ROGERS Minner (Mrs. Edwin J.), 349 Main Street, Egypt.

Clara WEIDA Andersen, 337 East Union Street, Allentown. Floor clerk, Allentown Hospital.

Martha WILLIAMS Reinard (Mrs. William L.), 314 Delaware Avenue, Palmerton.

1912

Edith DEIBERT Wolfe (Mrs. Homer H)., 553 Corey Street, Fort Bragg, Calif.

Catherine ECKERT, 33 South Seventh Street, Lebanon. Graduate work, Sibley Memorial Hospital, Washington, D.C.; cosmetician, shop owner.

Clara HAWK Sensinger (Mrs. John A.), 2322 South Fourth Street, Allentown.

Ella HEIL Hintz (Mrs. Edward), 7155 Cornell Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Helen JONES Taylor (Mrs. Harry), 11047 Eve Avenue, Lynwood, Calif.

Anna LONG Landis (Mrs. M. J.). Deceased.

Stella McLAUGHLIN Rueter (Mrs. Harold), 917 Fernwood Street, Bethlehem.

Ruth MENCH Hersh (Mrs. Joseph), 1243 Walnut Street, Allentown. Assistant to the city chemist, City Laboratory.

Florence NEWTON Stambaugh (Mrs. Charles), Reedsville.

Ida Serena PETERS, 906^4 North Seventh Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Marigold ROHRBACH Burkholder (Mrs. Jacob), 1352 Butler Street, Easton.

Nellie SAXTON Gray (Mrs. Howard E.), 431 Grant Street, Williamsport.

1913

Claudia BARNES Nester (Mrs. Calvin), 618 North St.Lucas Street, Allentown.

Lena BREITENSTEIN Moyer (Mrs. Charles F.), 318 Main Street, Slatington.

Stella FIEST Lewis. Deceased.

Anna FRANKENFIELD Kiechel (Mrs. Ray), 719 Main Street, Northampton.

Florence Julia HEIMBACH, 1551 Turner Street, Allentown.

Bertha HENRY Morrison (Mrs. Charles W.), 1401 Linden Street, Reading.

Cora HERSHBERGER, 1159 Logan Street, Denver, Colorado.

Anna HEYWOOD Deuster (Mrs. George)

Lulu LENTZ Boyer (Mrs. Solomon). Deceased.

Ida LONGACRE Trimmer (Mrs. Chauncey F.), 825 Maryland Avenue, York.

Anna McQUILKEN. Deceased.

Sara MILLER

Angelina OBERHOLTZER Fink (Mrs. Victor), 1510 Liberty Street, Allentown. Visitor, Department of Public Assistance, Lehigh County.

Edna ROBBINS Lesslie (Mrs. C. M. T.), 321 York Avenue, Tow-anda. Industrial nurse, Sylvania Electric Inc.

Clara ROTTET Butz (Mrs. Warren H.), 134 South Madison Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Mary SINGLETON Peters (Mrs. Fred), 3015 Derry Street, Harrisburg.

Sarah THOMAS Smith (Mrs. C. Fred), 34 South West Street, Allentown.

1914

No Class Because of Transition to Three Year Course.

1915

Mary BRELSFORD McLean. Deceased.

Ruth BROWN. Deceased.

Mary DIETER Bair, 615 Tilghman Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Ruth ENGLER Bailer (Mrs. Luther), 1921 Green Street, Allentown.

Helen HALL, 1038 Walnut Street, Allentown. Graduate work, New York Prep School, Columbia University, Muhlenberg College, Simmons College, Pennsylvania State College, and University of Pennsylvania; Army Nurse Corps, September 1918 to February 1919; private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Winifred HELLER. Deceased.

Mildred KURTZ Turner (Mrs. John A.), 343 South Chester Pike, Glen Olden.

Pearl KOONS Fenstermaker (Mrs. Robert R.), 345 Liberty Street, Bethlehem. Private duty.

Anna McMULLIN. Deceased.

Helen REINSMITH Brucher (Mrs. Adam, Jr.), 1427 Linden Street, Reading. Graduate work, Cedar Crest College; substitute school nurse, Reading.

Florence ROEDER Romig (Mrs. Richard R.), 549 North Third Street, Emmaus. Private duty.

Eva SCHALLER Sharadin (Mrs. Ray), 529 North St. Lucas Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Esther SCHEIRER Lange (Mrs. Walter W.), 1713 West Nedro Avenue, Philadelphia.

Alfreda SULTAN, 519 Broad Street, New Bern, N. C. Visiting nurse, New Bern, N. C.

Henrietta THATCHER Steel (Mrs. Reginald A.), 32-23 158th Street, Flushing, N. Y.

1916

Esther BIERMAN Blaso (Mrs. James G.), 108-50 Ditmans Blvd., East Elmhurst, N. Y. Navy nurse, Tune 15, 1917 to November 26, 1918.

Sophia BOLINSKI Vargo (Mrs. Frank), 505 North Sixth Street, Allentown. Industrial nurse, Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem.

Ethel EDWARDS. Deceased.

Elizabeth ETZEL Roddy (Mrs. John A.), 718 N.E. 19th Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Army Nurse Corps, January 26,

1918 to April 11, 1919.

Julia GREB, 151 East 60th Street, New York, N. Y. Floor duty, Doctor’s Hospital.

Elizabeth HAAS Ever (Mrs. Edwin A.), 233 South 17th Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Willard Parker Hospital, New York, N. Y.; Army Nurse Corps, February 2, 1918 to August 31, 1919; private duty.

Ida KERN Stump (Mrs. Wayne G.), 518 North Ninth Street, Allentown.

Jennie LEIBENGUTH Newman (Mrs. Joseph), 1805 Prospect Street, National City, California. Navy Nurse Corps, 1927-1928.

Hilda LEIBY Reinhardt (Mrs. Charles), 1120 North 20th Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, World War I.

Ida LEIBY Peter (Mrs. Oliver H.), 1105 North 19th Street, Allentown.

Matilda Jane MONTZ, Essex County Hospital, Belleville, N. J. Graduate work, Columbia University; night supervisor, Essex County Hospital, Belleville, N. J.

Isabel NORKEWICZ, 50 West 72nd Street, New York, N. Y. Graduate work, New York University; Army Nurse Corps, February 1918 to July 1919; Welfare Eye Classification Analyst, New York State Department of Social Welfare.

Bertha REPPERT Haines (Mrs. Harold H.), 15 Herkimer Road, Scarsdale, N. Y.

Sara SNYDER Ritter (Mrs. Hope T. M.), 101 North 11th Street, Allentown.

Stephana STRZELESKI Bellis (Mrs. Ray), 97 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, N. Y.

Evelyn THOMAS Wells (Mrs. John), 1334 Martine Avenue, Plainfield, N. J.

Caroline TOOLE Weisbach (Mrs. E. J.), 1137 Walnut Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Josephine WEBER Sweeney (Mrs. Charles J.), 2538 Gray Street, Detroit, Michigan. Army Nurse Corps, June 5, 1918 to July 12, 1919; first American woman to receive the Verdun Medal presented by the French Government.

Lillie Victoria WEIL, 502 North Muscatel Avenue, San Gabriel, California. Graduate work, University of Southern California College of Pharmacy, Ph.G.; Army Nurse Corps, August 1918 to September 1919; pharmacist, Methodist Hospital, Los Angeles, California.

Erma ZANKER Seiler (Mrs. Robert S.), 28 West Lincoln Street, Shamokin. Army Nurse Corps, February 3, 1918 to January 28, 1919.

Etheline CALWELL. Deceased.

Edith DOUT, 34 South Reading Avenue, Boyertown. Lieutenant, Army Nurse Corps, 1917 to 1919; operating room supervisor, Allentown Hospital.

Blanche FINK Longenecker (Mrs. Winfield), 142 North Ellsworth Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Blanche FORNER Edwards (Mrs. John B.), 908 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Florence GEHRIS Saillard (Mrs. John). Deceased.

Mary R. HAERTTER, 848 South Tenth Street, Allentown. Industrial nurse, Mack Manufacturing Corp.

Rose JOHNSON Bachman (Mrs. Rowland W.), 301 North Second Street, Allentown.

Mary KYLE Reiss (Mrs. Andrew E.), 503 16th Avenue, Newark, N.J.

Daisy MINNICH Gasser. Deceased.

Della QUIGLEY. Deceased.

Gertrude SCHULTZ Steel (Mrs. Charles L.), 324 Maitland Avenue, West Englewood, N. J. Red Cross Nurse, World War I.

1918

Marie BOCK. Deceased.

Beatrice BURNELL Russell (Mrs. Everett A.), 1504 Cliff Road, Overbrook Hills, Philadelphia.

Ethel CAMERON Harris, Box 42, Station B, Los Angeles, California.

Myrtle CLENDENING Whitaker (Mrs. Raymond B.), 27 School-house Lane, Broomall.

Kathryn ECKERT Beidelman (Mrs. Edgar R.), 1016 West Broad Street, Bethlehem.

Henrietta MENGEL Crumbaugh (Mrs. Harry), Maxatawny.

Jennie MOHR Ritter (Mrs. Martin L.), Fogelsville.

Helen MORRIS. Deceased.

Elsie Irene WHETSTONE, 9411/£ North 20th Street, Allentown. Industrial nurse, Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem.

Mabel Elizabeth WOLFE, 26 North New Street, Nazareth.

1919

Laura APPLEBACH Mayes (Mrs. Harry R.), Route 1, Emmaus.

Helen BEHRINGER Fox (Mrs. Charles). Deceased.

Anna Malenda BERKEMEYER, 442 Walnut Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Muhlenberg College, New York University, and Columbia University; head school nurse, Allentown School District.

Mabel BUSS Giering (Mrs. Robert D.), 10 Center Square, Nazareth. Graduate work, School of Social Service, Philadelphia.

Sara FROWNFELTER. Deceased.

Ethel GREINER Teter (Mrs. Earl), 4803 “R” Street, S.E., Washington, D.C.

Edna M. HARTMAN, Route 2, Quakertown.

Arvilla HAUCHE Burke, 1045 Oxford Road, N.E., Atlanta, Ga.

Caroline A. INNES, 89-18 171st Street, Jamaica, N. Y. Graduate work, University of Chicago and University of Vermont; administration, Barre City Hospital, Barre, Vermont.

Marie Katherine LAUDENSLAGER, 601 West 110th Street, New York, N. Y. Private duty, Presbyterian Hospital, New York.

Mae LAUER Kurtz (Mrs. Willoughby), 3130 Chestnut Street, N.E., Washington, D.C.

Florence MO WRY Signorello (Mrs. Jack), 5715 21st Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Edith NEWHARD Novak (Mrs. Andrew C.), 1030 South Eighth Street, Allentown.

Pearl NEWTON Gear, 1720 Mohn Avenue, Bronx, N. Y.

Lillian W. PICKEL, 219 North Sixth Street, Allentown. Head nurse, Out-patient Department, Allentown Hospital.

Elsie REINHART Snyder (Mrs. Henry), 231 North 11th Street, Allentown.

Laura RICHARDS Colvin (Mrs. Harold D.), 522 W. Oliver Street, Owosso, Michigan. Private duty.

Beatrice Elizabeth RITTER, 128 North Madison Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Columbia University, B.S., M.A.; director of nursing, Gallinger Municipal Hospital, Washington, D.C.

Sara ROTH Garrison (Mrs. Charles), 22 Pomona Street, Forty-Fort.

Stella SCHOTT

Ruth STRASSER Goepfert (Mrs. Edward T.), 801 Pennsylvania Avenue, Prospect Park.

Hazel WEIDMAN LaBar (Mrs. Floyd F.), 511 West Pennsylvania Avenue, Pen Argyl.

Claretta WONN Nelkin (Mrs. Morris), 209 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y.

1920

Margaret BRUNNER Meyers (Mrs. M.), 2721 East Moreland Street, Phoenix, Arizona.

Minnie Estella GINDER, 258 South First Street, Lehighton. Head nurse, Allentown Hospital.

Ethel Everhart HEMMIG, Elverson. Private duty, Philadelphia.

Florence KENNEDY Krause (Mrs. Otto J.), 14 Kress Street, Binghamton, N. Y. Private duty, Binghamton hospitals.

Alverta KERN Buss (Mrs. Truman H.), 1030 East Genesee Street, Syracuse, N. Y. Health nurse, Syracuse University Hospital.

Rachel McKEEVER Kemp (Mrs. Charles), 329 East Brown Street, East Stroudsburg. General duty, Monroe County General Hospital.

Mary REAGER King (Mrs. Robert), Waverly Avenue, Morton.

Anna SCANLIN Van Vaugh, Golden Oak Lane, Beesley Point, N.J.

Emily SMITH Gaines (Mrs. P.), 1154 Cadillac Boulevard, Akron, Ohio.

Stacia USHINSKI Moore, Route 1, Fleetwood.

Bertha WEIDENHAFER. Deceased.

Emma WOLFINGER Bradford, 109 Salem Avenue, Burlington, N.J.

1921

Millicent ARNEL Lent, Macungie.

Anna BEUTELSPACHER Diefenderfer (Mrs. Frank), 214 North Eighth Street, Allentown.

Marjorie DANIELS King (Mrs. Reuben H.), 15 Academy Place, West Hempstead, L. I., N. Y.

Anna DRAKELEY, 413 North Jasper Street, Allentown.

Martha GERSTER Stahl (Mrs. John P.), 721 Center Street, East Mauch Chunk.

Ruth GROMAN Fritschman (Mrs. Gus C.), 351 Woodward Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y.

Susanna HAAS Hummel (Mrs. L. S.), 45 Belvidere Street, Nazareth.

May HOLLINGER Silliman (Mrs. William W.), 1035 North 18th Street, Allentown.

Mary Naomi HOUSER, Route 2, New Tripoli. Graduate work, Cedar Crest College; Columbia University Teachers College,

B.S., M.A.; director of nursing, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem.

Laura Irene JONES, 1406 Turner Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Mary JORDAN, 2516 East Fifth Street, Tucson, Arizona.

Vanda KILTY. Deceased.

Pauline KISTLER Reed (Mrs. Feger), 326 East Center Street, Mahanoy City.

Bessie KLASE Weiss, 1922 North Fifth Street, Philadelphia. General duty, Stetson Hospital, Philadelphia.

Clara MERKEL, 1212 High Street, Pottstown.

Mabel LUDWIG. Deceased.

Pearl STILES Carvella (Mrs. Fred G.), 219 South Main St., Bangor.

Bernice THOMAS.

Mae WHITE Baker (Mrs. Douglas M.), Route 2, New Tripoli.

Pauline WILHELM Manderbach (Mrs. Roy G.), Ill Maple Avenue, Shillington.

Anna M. ZIEGLER, M.D., 31 South Ninth Street, Allentown. Columbia University, B.S.; New York University School of Medicine, M.D.; Resident in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman’s Hospital, Philadelphia, 1948-1949.

1922

Elsie ACKER Weder (Mrs. Frank E.), Route 1, Sellersville.

Ida CROTHERS Ludwig (Mrs. S. Howard), 263 East Market Street, York.

Edith DAVIS Reichardt (Mrs. Charles F.), 2118 Allen Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Muhlenberg College; anaesthetist and instructor in anaesthesia, Allentown Hospital.

Hilda FLORY. Deceased.

Alice Miriam DEEMER, 2317 Park Avenue, Easton. Operating room supervisor, Betts Hospital.

Gertrude KLINE, 122 North Fifth Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Columbia University Teachers College; supervisor of women personnel, Pennsylvania Power and Light Co.

Meta H. KRESGE, 221 Princeton Avenue, Palmerton. Private duty.

Mary LAUB Long (Mrs. Herbert), 206 Second Street, Cementon.

Pauline LAUBACH Berchenmiller, 666 Highland Avenue, Bethlehem. Graduate work, Pennsylvania State College.

Minnie LEIBY Deens (Mrs. Henry C.), 321 Butler Avenue, Ambler.

Ursula LONG Stine (Mrs. Russell W.), 2116 Allen Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Lutheran Deaconess Training School, Baltimore, Md.; general duty, Allentown Hospital.

Henrietta Elizabeth LUEBBERT, 213 South West Street, Allentown. X-ray technician.

Amber McFARLAND Miller, Route 2, Allentown. Office nurse.

Adele M. MILLER, 56 North Fifth Street, Bangor. Graduate work, Columbia University, B.S.; Lehigh University, M.A. in Ed.; director of nursing education, Allentown Hospital.

Kathryn M. O’DONNELL, 235 Marshall Avenue, Pittsburgh. Graduate work, Children’s Hospital, Pittsburgh, and Pennsylvania State College; school nurse, North Hills School, Pittsburgh.

Ella OVERHOLT Lamont (Mrs. Robert L.), 320 South Glen-wood Street, Allentown.

Viola PETERS Rutherford (Mrs. Joseph D.), 112 North 13th Street, Allentown.

Elizabeth ROTH Allebach, 528 North Berks Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

Minna STEYERT. Deceased.

Elgarda THOMPSON. Deceased.

Margaret STEWARD Bender (Mrs. William), 439 North Seventh Street, Allentown.

Mary WEBER Jones (Mrs. Edgar), 408 Lincoln Avenue, Pottstown.

1923

Gladys BARTHOLOMEW Nicol. Deceased.

Ruth BOWERS Henry, 45 Park Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J. Office nurse.

Lois EBERWEIN Hafer (Mrs. Ralph M.), 406 South Center Street, Pottsville.

Lulu K. E. HARTUNG, 1043 Maple Street, Allentown. Public health nurse.

Laura PAUL Williams (Mrs. Howard J.), 108 Cedar Street, Millville, N. J.

Laura QUAY Beckwith (Mrs. S. R.), 312 Wood Street, Vineland, N. J. Private duty, Newcomb Hospital.

Ida REAGER Shannon (Mrs. Charles), 219 West Pine Street, Shamokin. Relief nurse, Northumberland County Hospital.

Dorothy REBERT Eckert, 2044 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Catharine ROHLAND Noll (Mrs. William J.), 126 North Railroad Street, Annville. Private duty.

Sue SNYDER Morgan (Mrs. Howard W.), 113 Bank Street, St. Albans, Vermont.

Marion STEIGERWALT Ronse (Mrs. Owen H.), 74-15 35th Avenue, Jackson Heights, N. Y.

Alma M. URFFER, 505 Chew Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Columbia University Teachers College, B.S. in Nursing Education; nursing arts instructor, School of Nursing, Allentown Hospital.

Louella WARNCKE Ellis (Mrs. Glen S.), Treichlers. Director of nurses, Haff Hospital, Northampton; Army Nurse Corps, Captain, November 1940 to November 1946.

Ethel WEIDER. Deceased.

Margaret WILLIAMS Myers, 147 East James Street, Lancaster.

Mae WOODRING Kauffman, 220 South Ann Street, Lancaster.

1924

Mary Harriett BOWERS, 45 Park Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J. Assistant superintendent and anaesthetist, Bishop Rowe General Hospital, Wrangell, Alaska.

Catherine DALLING Weelands (Mrs. Johnson E.), 407 Birch Place, Westfield, N. J.

Eva EASTERDAY Delgan, 1304 Merriam Avenue, New York, N. Y.

Mabel FREY Heimer (Mrs. George), 1564 Martine Avenue, Route I, Plainfield, N. J.

Mary HILL Shier (Mrs. Heber P.), 21 Roger Avenue, Cranford, N.J.

Margaret KNAPKA Erickson (Mrs. Ernest), P.O. Box 66, Stillwater, N. J.

Bessie LAUER Litzenberger (Mrs. George), 743 St. John Street, Allentown. Clerk, Mack Manufacturing Corp.

Nina LICHTENWALNER Backensto (Mrs. Arthur B.), 25 Rankin Avenue, Troy, N. Y.

Ethel MILLER Miller, Tropical Trailer Village, 1398 N.W. 79th Street, Miami, Fla.

Marion PLACE Pennebacker (Mrs. Abraham), Route 1, Zions-ville.

Carolyn RYMON Maier (Mrs. Joseph), 180 Henderson Street, Fhillipsburg, N. J.

Emily TREXLER Messersmith, 119 East Main Street, Fleetwood.

Pauline WERLEY Kleppinger (Mrs. George), Chapel, Berks County.

Alyce WESNER Schelly (Mrs. Arthur J.), 416 Main Boulevard, Route 2, Allentown.

Fay YOUSE Yotter (Mrs. Mark), 2232 Northampton Street, Easton.

1925

Winifred CORCORAN Sheckler, 1147 Linden Street, Allentown.

Christine DANNECKER Horn (Mrs. Franklin), 1119 North 21st Street, Allentown.

Dorothy GRUVER Bastian (Mrs. Thomas C.), 122 Eagle Street, Emmaus.

Estella HILLEGASS Pforr (Mrs. Henry W.), Route 1, Macungie.

Hilda HORLACHER Gibson (Mrs. Stanley, Sr.), 328 South Franklin Street, Allentown.

Anna HUBER Davis (Mrs. Walter E.), 711 Washington Street, Cumberland, Md.

Winifred KASE Bausch (Mrs. Elmer H.), 252 North Seventh Street, Allentown.

Estella KLOUSER Nicholas (Mrs. Edward), 120 North Madison Street, Allentown.

Elda Mae KOHLER, 1217 Turner Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Anna Bertha KREISS, Fogelsville. Private duty.

Martin A. LEVINE, 1839 Hamilton Street, Allentown. Private duty, New York.

Goldie LUDKE Atherton (Mrs. Emmett K.), 144 Wood Street, Rutherford, N. J. Graduate work, Yale School of Nursing, New Haven, Conn.

Julia McELWAIN McGonigle, 630 North Penn Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

Ruth Anna MOYER, 904 Northampton Street, Easton. Charge of transfusion room, Doctor’s Hospital, New York.

Beatrice PERSING Stephens (Mrs. Alfred), 110 East Main Street, Macungie. Army Nurse Corps, First Lieutenant, Station Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Pauline PRICE Pearson, P. O. Box 163, Portland. Graduate work, Municipal Hospital, Pittsburgh, and Essex County Contagious Hospital, Belleville, N. J.; private duty.

Vivian SCHOCH. Deceased.

Clara SMITH Chapsaddle, 938 Parkway Boulevard, Alliance, Ohio. Assistant superintendent of nurses, Molly Stark Sanatorium.

Edna TROUTMAN Butz (Mrs. Earl), 38 South 17th Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

Martha WALTER Baush (Mrs. Mark A.), 502 North Sixth Street, Allentown.

Cecil WERT Haas, 955 Catasauqua Street, Fullerton.

Katherine ZIMMERMAN McGorry (Mrs. Edward), 108 North 12th Street, Allentown.

1926

Bertha Lisette ADLER, 919 South Sixth Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Columbia University Teachers College, B.S., M.A.; first assistant director of nursing, Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N.Y.

Geneva Elma BEDFORD, Wind Gap. Head nurse, Passaic General Hospital, Passaic, N. J.

Mattie BROBST Apple (Mrs. Morgan), 809 North Seventh Street, Allentown.

Margaret BUFFINGTON Workman, 527 Spruce Avenue, Upper Darby.

Bessie DORNEY, 236 North 12th Street, Allentown. School nurse, Allentown High School.

Lottie EHRET Barnhart, 3524 Union Street, Allentown. Industrial nurse, Mack Manufacturing Corp.

Irene FALK Schatz, 783 Broadway, Newark, N. J.

Edith Rebecca FEHR, Landingville. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Rose FLEMISH Fisher (Mrs. Charles A.), 334 South 18th Street, Allentown.

Ruth GEIGER Hughes. Deceased.

Grace HARNER Bower (Mrs. William L.), 317 South 23rd Street, Allentown.

Mary HILL Purdy (Mrs. Ira J.), 420 Diamond Street, Easton.

Dorothy HUBER Seem, 418 Ridge Street, Emmaus. Beautician.

Anna JONES Steyert (Mrs. William A.), 1032 North 21st Street, Allentown.

Margaret JONES Dreisbach (Mrs. Clarence), 916 North St. Lucas Street, Allentown.

Dorothy KILLIAN Morrisey, 2335 South 12th Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Lydia KINGINGER Gallapoo, 46 Fifth Street, Northeast, Barberton, Ohio.

Mary KIPP Reed, 363 44th Street, Sea Isle City, N. J. Beautician, Philadelphia.

Edythe MANWILLER Yoder (Mrs. Charles W.), 212 South Richmond Street, Fleetwood. School nurse, Fleetwood School District.

Mabel MERTZ Decker, River Road, South Front Street, Milton.

Sarah Isabel PALM, Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N. Y. Graduate work, Columbia University, B.S. in Nursing Education, MA. in Health Education; assistant director of nursing education, Westchester School of Nursing, Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N. Y.

Ethel Alverna SHAY, Box 44, Neffs. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania and Muhlenberg College; assistant head nurse, Out-patient Department, Allentown Hospital.

Irene SHUPP Bellis (Mrs. David R.), 108 West Broad Street, Hopewell, N. J.

Winifred TAYLOR Herman (Mrs. Albert G.), 521 Radcliffe Street, Bristol.

Lena UNDERWOOD Adcock, 181-18 Dalny Road, Jamaica, L. I., N. Y.

1927

Gisella ARTINGER Heller (Mrs. James R.), 8 South Eighth Street, Coplay. Graduate work, Columbia University Teachers College and Muhlenberg College.

Beatrice BITTNER Genszler, 752 North 19th Street, Allentown.

Ruth BITTNER Nagle (Mrs. Lemoine), New Tripoli.

Vivien BONNEY Houck (Mrs. H. J.), 960 West Tilghman Street, Allentown.

Minota CARLING Seiple (Mrs. Ralph), 717 Crescent Avenue, Reading.

Marie C. CRESSWELL, 370 Spruce Street, Pottstown. Graduate work, Jefferson Hospital, Philadelphia; industrial nurse, Spicer Manufacturing Corp.

Katherine GERSPACK, 1750 Northampton Street, Easton.

Laura HERING Weigel (Mrs. Walter), 1028 Mulberry Street, Reading. General duty, Berks County Tuberculosis Sanatorium.

Olga Ruth HRISKO, 161 Tilghman Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, May 1945 to January 1948, Second Lieutenant; resident school nurse, Perkiomen School for Boys.

Anna JONES Kehm, 1506 Turner Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Eva JUDD Conway (Mrs. James), 21 Foster Avenue, Valley Stream, L. I., N. Y.

Rebecca KISTLER Byars (Mrs. Joseph R.), 1114 Helen Avenue, Lancaster.

Louise KLOSS, 1201 Birkbeck Street, Freeland.

Anna LANSENDERFER Morgan (Mrs. M. Jack), 3031/^ South 15 th Street, Allentown.

Emma LEAH Follweiler, 217 North 15th Street, Allentown.

Florence LUCAS Snyder (Mrs. C. Enoch), 528 14th Avenue, Bethlehem.

Grace SAEGER Law (Mrs. Duncan M.), Route 1, Boonton, N. J.

Ruth SAEGER Gollmer (Mrs. Paul), 968 Tilghman Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Julia SCHUMACK Collins (Mrs. John T.) 1838 Turner Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Amey SMYTH Kleintop (Mrs. Harold E.), 619 West First Avenue, Parkesburg.

Claire SONDHEIM. Deceased.

Pearl WEAVER Kahler (Mrs. Ray F.), East Lawn, Nazareth.

1928

Lillian ACKROYD Hoffman (Mrs. Howard A.), 151 Rodney Street, Glen Rock, N. J.

Margaret BAKER Fuhrman (Mrs. John H.), 636 Highland Avenue, Lewistown.

Mildred BUNGER Schaeffer (Mrs. LeRoy C.), 1218 Carlisle Street, Tarentum.

Isabel DERR Givler (Mrs. Floyd C.), 1510 Union Street, Allentown.

Pauline DIEFENDERFER Mohr (Mrs. Eugene H.), Main Street, Alburtis.

Helen EARICH Gardner (Mrs. Evan H.), 1932 Whitehall Street, Allentown.

Sue FREY Stelz (Mrs. Harold), 214 North St. Cloud Street, Allentown.

Virginia GILLILAND Hart, 7262 Spruce Street, Upper Darby.

Kathryn GINKINGER Hartman (Mrs. Roland F.) 100-C Lexington Street, Newport, R. I. Graduate work, Columbia University Teachers College.

Mary G. HINTERLEITER, 224 North 17th Street, Allentown. Graduate work, School of Anaesthesia, Jewish Hospital, Philadelphia; anaesthetist, Allentown Hospital.

Melinda HOUSEKNECHT Reinmiller (Mrs. Andrew A.), 340 North Ninth Street, Allentown.

Isabel HUEGEL Scheirer (Mrs. Frank B.), 821 North Eighth Street, Allentown.

Violet KLOCK Newell (Mrs. Sheldon), 1102 Dreher Avenue, Stroudsburg.

Alice KUNKEL Kovach (Mrs. Louis), 576 Franklin Avenue, Palm-erton.

Kathryn LINDNER Gerlott (Mrs. James L.), 203 North Front Street, Darby.

Evelyn Frances LUDKE, Route 1, Coplay. Graduate work, Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago, Illinois; San Diego County Hospital, San Diego, California; Roosevelt Hospital, New York; Navy Nurse Corps Reserve, 1936-1942; private duty, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem, and Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown.

Arlene MASONHEIMER Knecht, Route 1, Macungie. Allentown Hospital.

Marie S. MILLER, 224 North 17th Street, Allentown. Assistant director of nursing service, Allentown Hospital.

Beatrice MOCHAMER Lill (Mrs. Kenneth), 9 West White Street, Summit Hill.

Virginia MOONEY Proud (Mrs. Ralph A.), Eddy Road, Route 1, Wickliffe, Ohio. Graduate work, University of Chicago.

Grace Esther MULLEN, 1459 78th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Private duty.

Florence May REES, 132 North Madison Street, Allentown. Suture nurse, City Hospital, New York.

Bertha Emma REMALEY, 629 North Seventh Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Virginia RIDDLE Gruver (Mrs. Gerald L.), 822 Third Street, Fullerton.

Minna SCHUBERT Mordaunt, 938 Hamilton Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

Bertha SCHWALM Goudy (Mrs. Robert E.), 402 West Kenan Street, Wilson, N. C.

Melba SMITH Neumann (Mrs. George J.), 332 North 29th Street, Allentown.

Emma Sophie UNVERZAGT, 1623 Allengrove Street, Frankford, Philadelphia. Private duty.

Kathryn VAN DOREN Kiefer (Mrs. John H.), Box 93, Raubs-ville. Private duty.

1929

Helen ANTHONY Geisler (Mrs. Raymond H.), Trexlertown.

Naomi ARMSTRONG Grim (Mrs. Herben G.), 923 South Seventh Street, Allentown.

Anna Mae ARTZ, Hegins. General staff nurse, Ashland State Hospital.

Alice Anna BACH, 911 Tilghman Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Dorothy BERGER. Deceased.

Catherine BROOKS Schaaf (Mrs. F.), 79-27 Calamus Avenue, Elmhurst, N. Y.

Beatrice CHADWICK Litka (Mrs. William C.), 120 North 11th Street, Allentown. General duty, Allentown Hospital.

Eva CLAUSS Hunsicker (Mrs. Luverne T.), Lime Street, Fogels-ville.

Emma COPPERSMITH Mertz (Mrs. Paul D.), 222 North St. George Street, Allentown.

Mary DAUBERT Ritter, Trexlertown.

Alma FREY Knorr (Mrs. Robert E.), 522 North 29th Street, Allentown.

Margaret Elizabeth GINTHER, 202 North Seventh Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Emily HAWK Deifer. Deceased.

Anna Elizabeth HUGHES, 1341 West 46th Street, Los Angeles, California. Army Nurse Corps, September 1941 to January 1943, Second Lieutenant; charge nurse, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York.

Elizabeth JONES Miller (Mrs. Claude), 419 South Street, Slat-ington.

Irma JONES Timko (Mrs. John), 42 James Street, Bloomfield, N. J.

Edith KENT Watters (Mrs. John W.), 217 Bacon Street, Jermyn.

Martha KERBAUGH Snyder (Mrs. K.), 2310 Forrest Street, Easton.

Louise KINGINGER Beck (Mrs. Lloyd W.), Route 1, Macungie.

Pauline KUNKLE, 576 Franklin Avenue, Palmerton.

Myrtle Lavinia LEH, 522 North 29th Street, Allentown. Graduate work, George Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn.; private duty, Miami Beach, Fla.

Ruth MARTIN Burtner (Mrs. Warren E.), 519 West Main Street, Hummelstown.

Jennie PFEIFLY Gruber (Mrs. Henry A.), Lynnport.

Laura RIEGEL Haas (Mrs. Lloyd), 4403 Locust Lane, Colonial Park.

Verna SCHWEITZER Currey (Mrs. Harry), 25 Blackbume Terrace, West Orange, N. J. Clinic supervisor, Newark Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Arlene SILFIES Oke, Peters Boulevard, Brightwater, L. I., N. Y.

Margaret SIMMONS Shea (Mrs. J. S.), 2108 Market Street, Camp Hill.

Ruth SPEER Lynch (Mrs. E. A. P.), Waring Road, Route 5, Box 850, Memphis, Tenn. Graduate work, George Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn., and Siena College, B.S.

Ruth WAGNER Stoneback, Springtown.

Dorothy WERTZ Apffel (Mrs. Louis K.), 529 North St. Elmo Street, Allentown.

Goldie WILLIAMS Brown (Mrs. Mitchell R.), 265 South Edwards Avenue, Syracuse, New York. Army Nurse Corps, September 1945 to April 1946, Second Lieutenant; graduate work, Syracuse University.

1930

Florence ACKROYD Olmstead (Mrs. Ivan J.), 36 Avenue “A”, Cornwall-on-Hudson, N. Y.

Ethel ALBERT DeRone (Mrs. Russel), 1241 Turner Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Pearl BOYER Sensinger (Mrs. Warner E.), 274 East Fairview Street, Allentown.

Ethel BUTZ, 310 North 15th Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Pennsylvania Hospital; assistant head nurse and delivery room nurse, Allentown Hospital.

Blanche CHAMBERLAIN Gosling (Mrs. Ellsworth, Jr.), 701 Parkway Avenue, Trenton, N. J.

Eleanor DAVIES Eichenlaub (Mrs. Frank J.), 36 South 43rd Street, Irvington, N. J. Graduate work, Sloane Hospital, Presbyterian Medical Center, New York.

Mary DeTHOMAS, 1610 West Sligh Avenue, Tampa, Fla. Supervisor, St. Joseph Hospital.

Ethlyn Lillian EICHEL, Allentown Hospital, Allentown. Graduate work, Columbia University, B.S.; Lehigh University, M.A.; director of nursing, Allentown Hospital, June 1948.

Mary EVERLY Schwab (Mrs. Dudley Y.), 1122 Washington Street, Easton.

Ruth GREASEMER Grube (Mrs. Earl S.), Route 2, Coopersburg. Private duty, Quakertown Community Hospital.

Helen GREEN, Box 135, Weissport.

Edna GRIFFITH Lehr (Mrs. Ray), Route 3, Allentown.

Katherine HAMEL Schoenly (Mrs. Charles), Coopersburg.

Emily HOFFMAN Petiprin (Mrs. Floyd R.), 5608 Oakmont Avenue, Bethesda, Md. Navy Nurse Corps, July 1935 to July 1938.

Dorothy HOWARD Lydon, 903 West Coldspring Lane, Baltimore, Md. Supervisor, Out-patient Department, U. S. Marine Hospital, Baltimore, Md.

Pearl Mae HUBER, 1410 East Gordon Street, Allentown. Supervisor (maternity), Irvington General Hospital, Irvington, N. J.

Winnie Beatrice KIPP, 710 Old Home Road, Baltimore, Md. Industrial nurse, the Glenn L. Martin Co.

Grace KOHLER Teuten (Mrs. Thomas J.), 14 Cedar Avenue, Rockville Centre, N. Y.

Myrtle KREITZ Muschlitz (Mrs. Charles H.), 435 Main Street, Slatington.

Marion LAPP Reichard (Mrs. Tilghman W.), 1520i/o Allen Street, Allentown.

Marguerite LEIBY, Delaware County Hospital, Drexel Hill. General duty, Delaware County Hospital, Drexel Hill.

Margaret LINDERMUTH Kachelries (Mrs. Robert S.), 1020 East Sunbury Street, Shamokin.

Martha McQUILKEN Hartman (Mrs. Brooke R.), 620 North Leh Street, Allentown.

Mary MANTZ Best (Mrs. Frederic W.), 2029 Washington Street, Allentown.

Hilda MILLER Bernhard (Mrs. John J.), 33 North 17th Street, Allentown.

Mona VANATTA Marcks (Mrs. Kerwin M.), 2140 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Margaret WALCK Ash (Mrs. William B.), Fort Salongo, North-port, N. Y.

Marion WALCK Meckley (Mrs. Frederick S.), Neffs.

Mary WALLACAVAGE Perotto, 621 North Muhlenberg Street, Allentown.

Martha WIDMYER Flay, 1151 North 12th Street, Reading. Private duty.

1931

Anna ABELE. Deceased.

Evelyn ANTHONAVICH Renton, 119 Lake Street, Arlington, Mass.

Iva ARNOLD, Dover, Del. Graduate work, Teachers College, N. Y.; office nurse.

Flora ARTZ Schminky (Mrs. Ralph L.), 2229 North Third Street, Harrisburg.

Mildred A. BELL, 427 Logan Street, Lewistown. Army Nurse Corps, January 1943 to February 1946, First Lieutenant; graduate work, Manhattan Maternity, N. Y., and Margaret Hague Maternity, N. Y.; industrial nurse, Aruba, Curacao, N.W.I.

Helen BLEFKO. Deceased.

Louise V. BRENCKMAN, 129 North Tenth Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Juliet Cora CALKINS, 309 East 23rd Street, New York, N. Y. Staff nurse, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Tune CRAIG Reese (Mrs. Roscoe), 131 North West Street, Allentown.

Martine EASTERDAY Hahn (Mrs. Chester N.), 300 North Walnut Street, East Orange, N. J.

Leah May ENSINGER, Route 3, Box 109, Wernersville. Graduate work, Albright College and Pennsylvania State College; Army Nurse Corps, Captain; supervisor, Valley Forge General Hospital, Phoenixville.

Cynthia ERIG McKeone (Mrs. Robert E.), 541 North Eighth Street, Allentown.

Kathryn EVANS Smith (Mrs. Earl K.), 110 Messinger Street, Bangor.

Evangeline GEEHR Graf (Mrs. George W.), 909 Fifth Avenue, Bethlehem.

Emma GERITZ Venseret (Mrs. Henry L.), 1212 Maple Street, Bethlehem.

Grace GRAVER Paterson, Abbeyville and Washington Roads, Pittsburgh.

Catherine GUSTIN Saul (Mrs. Ernest), Route 1, Fletcher, Ohio.

Ellen HARTE Gernerd (Mrs. Henry), Fogelsville. Private duty.

Marjorie KISTLER Maddow (Mrs. Benjamin), 3824 Brunswick Avenue, Drexel Hill. Graduate work, Hospital of Special Surgery, N. Y.

Verna LANDIS Kuner (Mrs. J. Frank), 2605 South Eighth Street, Arlington, Va.

Lulu LAUCHNOR Sanchez (Mrs. Sandy S.), 23 Graver Street, Heights, Lehighton.

Anna LOWRIE Charles (Mrs. Haydn W.), 616 North 12th Street, Allentown.

Genevieve McELWAIN McDonald (Mrs. Charles U.), 1817 Washington Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Doris MANN Joyce (Mrs. John W.), Route 1, Rome, Pa.

Helyn MENGES Paules (Mrs. Clair L.), 925 South Duke Street York.

Ethel MITCHELL. Deceased.

Inez PHILLIPS Gaumer (Mrs. Wilbur), 350 Delaware Avenue, Palmerton.

Mildred REX Lawlor, 307 West Franklin Street, Berne, Ind.

Eleanor RIEBEN Zussy, 208 South Menoa Road, Upper Darby.

Gertrude RUHL Gehris (Mrs. Edgar), Route 1, Mertztown.

Kathryn SECHLER Keller (Mrs. Paul), Fogelsville.

Caroline SHELLING Danner, Box 211, Route 2, Allentown.

Julia SHERER Ritter (Mrs. Stewart E.), 29 South Berks Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Columbia University, B.S.

Elizabeth SNYDER Klimeck, 229 Grape Street, Fullerton. Public health nurse.

Louise WETZLER Rossman (Mrs. Hubert), East Bishop Street, Bellefonte. Private duty.

Catherine WHITE Bevlin, 324 East Raspberry Street, Bethlehem.

Miriam WOODRING Tull (Mrs. Leon E.), 1422 North duPont Street, Wilmington, Del.

1932

Pauline ALTEMOSE Fackler (Mrs. Charles), 236 North Madison Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Cook County School of Nursing, Chicago, 111.

Mary BARRETT Gover (Mrs. Earl R.), 1025 North Street, East Mauch Chunk. Private duty, Palmerton Hospital.

Esther CHRISTIANSEN Morgenstern, 138 South Law Street, Allentown. General duty, Allentown Hospital.

Emaline COLEMAN.

Verna CRESSMAN Kostenbader (Mrs. A. Frederick), 1622 Walnut Street, Allentown.

Mildred EICHEL Fink (Mrs. Daniel), 218 South Madison Street, Allentown.

Elsie ERNST Bull (Mrs. H. R.), 1203 Main Street, Grand Junction, Colo.

Ethel FEIST Hahn (Mrs. John), 1025 West Front Street, Berwick.

Elizabeth FRYE Weller, 215i/2 South 14th Street, Allentown.

Verona HAWK Schray (Mrs. Kermit), 35 South Tenth Street, Allentown. General duty, Allentown Hospital.

Eleanor HOFFMAN Honsberger (Mrs. J.), 1008 Washington Street, Freeland.

Charlotte HOHL Wright (Mrs. Ernest C. M.), 1525 Liberator Avenue, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Emily HORNE Stauffer (Mrs. Guy V.), 1S6 West Main Street, Ringtown.

Vera JONES Treible (Mrs. Reed E.), 176 South Eighth Street, Bangor.

Edna KISTLER Yost, 431 East Laurel Street, Bethlehem. General duty, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem.

Alma LASER Kratzer (Mrs. Albert), 563 Chestnut Street, Emmaus.

Gladys MANTZ Wilson (Mrs. James O.), 358 Broad Street, Emmaus.

Laura MANTZ Kancle, Sheridan.

Eleanor MILLER Thomas (Mrs. William), 117 West Bertsch Street, Lansford. Private duty.

Ruby OVERHOLT Sachs (Mrs. Forrest), Route 2, Allentown. Laboratory technician.

Catharine PETERS Serfass (Mrs. Elmer E.), 22 North Fairview Avenue, Greenawalds, Allentown. Graduate work, Woman’s Hospital, Philadelphia.

Margaret REID Lowry, 852 North Sixth Street, Allentown.

Evelyn RITTER Stahler (Mrs. Paul A.), 21 North 11th Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.; registered nurse, drug company, Allentown.

Dorothy Irene ROTH, 227 North Fifth Street, Emmaus. Army Nurse Corps, March 1941 to October 1946, Captain; student, Teachers College of Columbia University.

Lucile ROTH Herb, 128 Wilson Street, Egypt.

Margaret SCHAFER Small (Mrs. James F.), 1724 West Broad Street, Bethlehem.

Edna SCHNELL Gross (Mrs. Harold H.), East Rock Road, Route 3, Bethlehem. General duty, Allentown State Hospital.

Dorothy STINE Ginkinger (Mrs. Franklin T.), 2134 Washington Street, Allentown.

Margaret TILTON Biery (Mrs. Parker), 954 Club Avenue, Allentown. Charge nurse, solutions room, Allentown Hospital.

Marian TROUT Klientob, 118 West Second Street, Berwick. General duty, Berwick Hospital.

Ida VAN HORN Ferdinand (Mrs. Ralph), 38 Field Point Road, Greenwich, Conn. Graduate work, Philadelphia General Hospital; private duty, Greenwich Hospital.

Laura WALBURN Weston (Mrs. Kenneth), 1304 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Margaret WATKINS Rupp (Mrs. George), 628 North 16th Street, Allentown.

Helen WEAVER Reimert (Mrs. Lawrence), 204 Columbia Avenue, Palmerton. Graduate work, Children’s Hospital, Pittsburgh! and Columbia University Teachers College.

Dorothy WERTMAN Edwards (Mrs. Jess N.), 601 Oak Street, Irwin.

Henrietta WESNER Heimbach (Mrs. Milton F.), 407 North Main Street, Doylestown.

Hilda WILLIAMS Uhler (Mrs. John K.), 702 Grant Street, Easton.

Arlene ZANDERS Gover (Mrs. Kramer C.), Lake Harmony. Army Nurse Corps, August 1941 to December 1941, Second Lieutenant.

1933

Pearl BENDER Savitz (Mrs. Charles H.), Route 4, Allentown.

Pauline BORTZ Schell, 902 Wyoming Street, Allentown.

Mina DAVIS Martz (Mrs. John E.), 208 North Rock Street, Sha-mokin.

Martha DENNIS Keat (Mrs. Herbert S.), 201 North Robinson Avenue, Pen Argyl. Graduate work, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Columbia University, and Jewish Hospital School o£ Anaesthesiology, Philadelphia; anaesthetist, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem.

Marian DUTT Sandercock, Bangor.

Sylvia EDWARDS Metzger (Mrs. Albert C.), 2203 Liberty Street, Allentown.

Grace Irene FINK, 319 North Fountain Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Mabel Marian FUNK, 44 South 12th Street, Quakertown. School nurse, Allentown School District.

Irene GERY Hahn (Mrs. Kenneth), 1207 Prospect Street, York. Navy Nurse Corps, December 1943 to June 1944, Ensign.

Elizabeth GRUVER Kuntz, 228 North Florence Street, Burbank, Calif.

Gladys Marie HAMMER, 1021 Third Street, Catasauqua. Private duty.

Susan HARDING Dohner (Mrs. Roy R.), 4015 Lasher Road, Drexel Hill.

Thelma Catherine HARDING, Main Street, Bath. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania, B.S. in Ed.; Lehigh University, M.A.; medical teaching supervisor, Allentown Hospital.

Marion HARRISON, 544 North Sixth Street, Allentown. Industrial nurse, General Cigar Co. Inc.

Arlene HENDRICKS Fraser (Mrs. Joseph), 422 Kenmore Drive, Evansville, Ind. Graduate work in pediatrics; Army Nurse Corps, July 1945 to November 1946, Second Lieutenant.

Nester HLUSCHAK Malarchuk (Mrs. P.), 3120 Glenwood Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. Office nurse.

Anna HOLTZMAN LaFave (Mrs. Ralph), 255 79th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Ruth HUNSICKER Snyder (Mrs. Newton), Route 1, Wernersville. Supervisor, Wernersville State Hospital.

Frances JELLISON Gamble (Mrs. R. W.), 842 South Poplar Street, Allentown.

Gladys KNUTZEN Hedden (Mrs. Edward H.), Route 1, Coopers-burg.

Ruth KREITZ Mauger (Mrs. Von E.), Oxford, N. J.

Claire KRESGE Sniffin, Brodheadsville. Private duty, Ossining Hospital, Ossining, N. Y.

Hazel MARKLEY Carpenter, 503 Church Street, Danville. Graduate work, Women’s Hospital, Philadelphia; charge nurse, Danville State Hospital.

LaRuhe OTT Bader, 410 South 18th Street, Allentown.

Edith RABENOLD McIntyre (Mrs. Leo R.) 3004 Turner Street, Allentown.

Gladys RABENOLD Stegura (Mrs. Barney A.) 630 South Hanover Street, Nanticoke. Office nurse.

Dama REX Silverman (Mrs. Morton I.), 1346 Linden Street, Allentown. Graduate work in operating room technique.

Bertha RIMBACH Blackburn (Mrs. William), 104 South Cedar Street, Hazleton.

Evelyn SCHADEN Snyder (Mrs. Robert S., Jr.), 449 “J” Avenue, Coronado, Calif.

Miriam SMITH Krause (Mrs. Gerald R.), 2446 South Fourth Street, Allentown.

Isabelle SNYDER Shirk, 1318 North LaSalle Street, Indianapolis, Ind.

Beatrice SOLT Schaeffer (Mrs. Robert), Box 27, Johnsonburg, N.J.

Eleanor SPAETH Schwenzer, 531 Tilghman Street, Allentown.

Thelma SPECHT Pascoe (Mrs. John C.), 500 American Street, Catasauqua. Graduate work in psychiatry.

Rena STEINMAN Sherman (Mrs. Alvin J.), 344 South 14th Street, Allentown. Private duty, Quakertown Hospital and Sacred Heart Hospital.

Dorothy STONEBACK Stahl (Mrs. Lloyd), 601 Hanover Avenue, Allentown.

Melba STROHL Nace (Mrs. D. Norton), 325 East Main Street, Kutztown.

Jean WENDEL Bourquin (Mrs. Robert), 608 Juniper Street, Quakertown. General duty, Quakertown Hospital.

1934

Lillian Elizabeth ALLEM, 627 Juniper Street, Quakertown. Operator, Tice Clinic, Quakertown.

Dorothy ANTHONY Redmond, 432 West Tenth Street, West Con-shohocken.

Dorothy BACHMAN Kohler, Schnecksville.

Pauline BORTZ Riegel, 902 Wyoming Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

Clara CAPOZZOLA Green (Mrs. Joseph A.), Ridge Avenue, Pen Argyl. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania.

Evelyn COLEMAN Kramlich (Mrs. Frank L., Jr.), Route 2, Northampton. Army Nurse Corps, June 1944 to November 1945, Second Lieutenant; school nurse, Northampton County.

Florence DARRAN Mitchell (Mrs. Robert E.), 604 North Street, East Mauch Chunk.

Lillian DIEHL Gabel (Mrs. LeRoy L.), Route 1, Green Lane.

Alda Lenora DITCHFIELD, Riverside Hospital, Newport News, Va. Graduate work, University of Oregon, B.S., and University of Oregon Medical School; director of nursing, Riverside Hospital.

Dorothea EGE Gauker, West Independence Street, Orwigsburg. Army Nurse Corps, March 1941 to April 1946, Captain; staff nurse, Cornwall, N. Y.

Mary GREEN. Deceased.

Margaret GRIFFITHS Stahler (Mrs. Wilbur), 1120 North 21st Street, Allentown.

Helen HALE Barnes (Mrs. Harold S.), Route 2, Allentown.

Martha HARTE Heliger, Route 1, Quakertown.

Nola HESS, 301 Arch Street, Berwick.

Irene HOLSTEIN Peters (Mrs. Malcolm A.), 212 South 35th Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Miriam HOOVER Heimbach (Mrs. Francis E.), State Street, East Greenville.

Gladys KAUFFMAN Altland (Mrs. Edward J.), Route 2, West Columbia, S. C. Private duty.

Elma KERBAUGH Fox (Mrs. LeRoy C.), Morgan’s Hill, Route 4, Easton. Graduate work, Philadelphia Children’s Hospital.

Helen KRAMER Johnson (Mrs. Charles F.), 216 North Fourth Street, Emmaus.

Dorothy McCOLLY Evans (Mrs. Edgar), 24 South Sixth Street, Quakertown.

Lillian MILLER, 113 East Fell Street, Summit Hill. Supervisor, Coaldale State Hospital.

Adelma MOYER Kethledge (Mrs. William R.), Box 8, Raubsville.

Esther Laura MOYER, Momingside Terrace, Route 60, Allentown. Graduate work, Columbia University Teachers College, B.S., M.A.; assistant director of nursing in nursing education, Gal-linger Hospital, Capital City School of Nursing, Washington, D.C.

Ruth PECK Zaylskus (Mrs. Frank P.), 25 Ringtown Road, Shenandoah Heights.

Dorothy PETERS Troxell (Mrs. Charles W.), 2437 South Fourth Street, Allentown.

Arline SCHMOYER Ritter, 2140 Allen Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Cornell University.

Martha SERF ASS Vannatta (Mrs. Nelson T.), 1925 Washington Avenue, Northampton.

Margaret Laura SIPOS, Route 3, Bangor. Navy Nurse Corps, July 1944 to May 1946, Lieutenant, junior grade; ship’s nurse, U. S. Maritime Commission, American Export Lines, N. Y.

Mildred SMITH Bevan, 419 North Fountain Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

Miriam UN ANGST Ritter (Mrs. Robert V.), Route 3, Allentown.

Helen VERCUSKY Kinslow, 322 Logan Avenue, New York, N. Y.

Ann WALLACAVAGE Banks (Mrs. Walter), 8 West Main Street, Macungie.

Evelyn WEBB Boyle (Mrs. Allan E.), 511 North Tenth Street, Allentown.

1935

Julia Dolores BALON, 536 Centre Street, Freeland. Industrial nurse, Mack Manufacturing Corp.

Pauline BENYO Gibbs (Mrs. Harold), 1212 South 15th Street, Temple, Texas. Nurse, junior grade, Veterans Administration, Temple, Texas.

Hazel BOYER Grafton (Mrs. Walter), 4621 Princeton Avenue, Philadelphia.

Kathryn CONRAD Jones, 69 Custer Street, Wilkes Barre. General duty, State Homeopathic Hospital, Allentown.

Margaret DULLENKOPF Weisel (Mrs. William F., Jr), 800 Park Avenue, Quakertown. Graduate work, Willard Parker Hospital, «N • Y •

Helen EBERT Stahley (Mrs. Earl), 1816 Pennsylvania Street, Allentown.

Evelyn Mae FALK, 184 Roosevelt Street, Egypt. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania, Muhlenberg College, and Lehigh University; school nurse, Whitehall Township.

Clara GRIESEMER, 224 South Muhlenberg Street, Allentown.

Lena HECKERT Albright (Mrs. Dill), Orefield.

Esther HOHL Ebert (Mrs. Herbert C.), 217 North Sixth Street, Allentown. X-ray technician, Allentown Hospital.

Arlene JARRETT Koch (Mrs. Paul W.), 302 North Ninth Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

Joy JOHNSON Roberts, 322 North Arch Street, Allentown.

Nellie KALANUSKY Lamberto (Mrs. Anthony J.), 233 Oak Street, Winsted, Conn.

Catherine KRAMER Henninger, 708 Turner Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Beulah Louise MANN, 17 North Second Street, Bangor. Army Nurse Corps, July 1942 to January 1946, Captain; nurse, Santa Barbara Clinic.

Anna MASONHEIMER Bachman (Mrs. Paul), 364 Mauch Chunk Street, Nazareth.

Bessie MILLER Stump (Mrs. Lester), 221 South Main Street, Pine Grove. Office nurse.

Irene MUTHARD Smith (Mrs. Robert C.), 920 Seneca Street, Bethlehem.

Ruth POWELL Rohn (Mrs. Roger C.), 1019 Fifth Street, Cata-sauqua.

Christine Kathryn REMMEL, 437 North 16th Street, Allentown. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania, Muhlenberg College, and Lehigh University; school nurse, Allentown School District.

Elizabeth Sophia ROTH, 614 Bath Avenue, Catasauqua. Office nurse.

Pauline Wieder SCHMID, 314 North Seventh Street, Allentown. Navy Nurse Corps, March 9, 1943 to -, Lieutenant; National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md.

Ruth SHUPP Shimer, 1347 Chew Street, Allentown.

Evelyn SLOYER Andrews (Mrs. Paul L.), Box 50, Parkertown, N. J. Army Nurse Corps, Second Lieutenant.

Elsie SMITH Haines (Mrs. Frank), 213 Church Street, Catasauqua.

Grace SNYDER Diehl, 230 North Church Street, Allentown.

Mildred STEIFEL Saeger (Mrs. Warren T.), 2536 Easton Avenue, Bethlehem. Graduate work, Columbia University Teachers College.

Grace STERNER Ruloff (Mrs. Charles), 302 East 21st Street, Northampton.

Kathryn Elizabeth STOCKER, 217 North Sixth Street, Allentown. General duty, Allentown Hospital.

Anna WEHR Roth (Mrs. Harvey N.), Route 1, Lehighton.

Antoinette YANKOSKI Swankoski (Mrs. Charles), Route 1, Drums.

Dorothy Ruth YOST, 18 East Walnut Street, Ephrata. Army Nurse Corps, November 1942 to January 1946, First Lieutenant; graduate work, Margaret Hague Hospital, Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia, Bryant College, Providence, R. I.; assistant head nurse, Margaret Hague Maternity Hospital, Jersey, City, N. J.

1936

Anna ANDREYO Edraney (Mrs. James), 1131 Turner Street, Allentown. Graduate work, New York Hospital; private duty.

Virginia H. BALLARD, Willis Wharf, Va. Army Nurse Corps, May 1941 to February 1946, First Lieutenant; office nurse, Norfolk, Va.

Myrtle BECHTEL Schmoyer (Mrs. D. Burnell), 113 East Main Street, Macungie.

Miriam DEMPSEY Wirth (Mrs. William J.), North Main Street, Middleville, N. Y.

Sara Madeline EVITTS, 424 South Second Street, Lykens. Private duty.

Marian FAUST Gansman (Mrs. David H.), 5500 Wayne Avenue, Philadelphia.

Catherine FREY Uhler (Mrs. Irvin V.), 606 Starr Street, Phoenixville. Industrial nurse, Goodrich Tire Co.

Sterla FRITZINGER Kennedy (Mrs. Thomas L.), 1933 Allen Street, Allentown.

Anna GRAEBER Baldwin (Mrs. J. D.), 123 East Peace Street, Canton, Miss.

Mildred HAMILTON Schweitzer (Mrs. Henry W.), 1036 Tacoma Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, N. Y.; Navy Nurse Corps, March 1942 to November 1942, Ensign.

Caroline HAUSMAN Murphy (Mrs. J. B.), Orefield. Navy Nurse Corps, September 1939 to July 1941.

Gertrude HEADSTROM Brong (Mrs. Woodrow S.), 121 West North Street, Nazareth.

Mary KLASE Hunsinger, 1624 Maple Street, Bethlehem.

Anna Maye KOLBECK, Mountain-top. Private duty.

Anna KULOKAS Bunsavage, 252 Ohio Avenue, Shenandoah Heights. Private duty, Locust Mountain Hospital.

Ellen LEFTWICH Pinnell (Mrs. Thomas H., Jr.), Echo Hill, Towaco, N. J.

Emma Jean LORENZETTI, 340 Center Street, Freeland. Army Nurse Corps, July 1942 to June 1947, Major; Army Nurse Corps.

Mildred McCAY Brong (Mrs. George C.), Main Street, Bath.

Miriam MINNER Pickel (Mrs. Ray W.), 47 Cherry Street, Wal-nutport.

Ruth MORGENSTERN Schlough, 6 Richmond Road, Route 1, Easton.

Mary MUTZL Stothoff, 608 North 11th Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Ora Klingeman PHILLIPS, 28 East Pine Street, Mahanoy City. Graduate work in obstetrics; supervisor, Allentown Hospital.

Vera ROCKWELL Bower, 408 Oakwood Drive, Fullerton.

Helen Irene SCHAUMBERGER, 742 East Market Street, Danville. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania, B.S.; Navy Nurse Corps, June 1945 to August 1946, Ensign; public health nurse, American Red Cross, Danville Chapter.

Beatrice SITTLER Kistler (Mrs. Ralph), 1407 West Broad Street, Quaker town.

Muriel UEBERROTH Frankenfield (Mrs. Ben O.), Route 2, Bethlehem.

Mary WELDER Koch (Mrs. Clarence E.), 105 White Oak Street, Kutztown. Graduate work, Columbia University, University of Pennsylvania, and Muhlenberg College; visiting nurse, Kutztown.

Alma WILLIAMS Grim (Mrs. Robert A.), 933 Cedar Street, Allentown.

1937

Loretta ARAZA Borsoi (Mrs. Charles), 1039 Decatur Street, Bethlehem. Graduate work, New York Hospital; private duty.

Lila BECK Wennig (Mrs. Robert), 679 Ridge Street, Emmaus.

Mildred DULANEY Frounfelker (Mrs. George A.), 114 North Franklin Street, Allentown.

Arline EISENHART Culp (Mrs. Noble), 3381 Kilmer Street, Birmingham, Mich. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia.

Katherine EVES Trexler (Mrs. Ethan), 15 South Franklin Street, Fleetwood. Graduate work, New York Hospital.

Eleanor FOX, 308 Walnut Street, Spring City.

Mamie FROST Armstrong, 1136 Union Street, Allentown.

Clara GREYGONIS Kawecke (Mrs. Henry), 111 East Washington Street, Fleetwood.

Arlene GUTH Fegley (Mrs. Homer B.), 131 Front Street, Cata-sauqua.

Marjorie HEIL Sassaman, 1506 West Montgomery Avenue, Philadelphia.

Margaret HOEHLE Schell (Mrs. Robert G.), 1517 Hanover Avenue, Allentown. Graduate work, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.

Florence HUNSBERGER Moyer (Mrs. Ralph S.), Franklin Street, Alburtis. Graduate work, New York Hospital; office nurse.

Dorothy JOHNSON Bartholomew (Mrs. William B.), 502 West Chemung Street, Painted Post, N. Y. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania and Kutztown State Teachers College; relief nurse, Corning Hospital, N. Y.

Jessie KICHLINE Hawk (Mrs. Roy A.), 934 Liberty Street, Allentown.

Arlene KRAMER Landis (Mrs. E. Arthur), California Road, Route 2, Quakertown. Private duty.

Dorothy LUHMAN Heffelfinger (Mrs. Alvin), 1022 Third Street, Catasauqua.

Frances McCORMICK Wismer (Mrs. Francis K.), 1660 Cloverleaf Street, Bethlehem.

Ethel McQUILKEN Turnbach (Mrs. Robert J.), 1443 Linden Street, Allentown.

Virginia MARCHETTO Palladino (Mrs. Nunzio), 210 Amboy Street, Plainfield, 111. Graduate work, Columbia University, University of Pennsylvania, and Muhlenberg College.

Louise MORRALL Bruder (Mrs. Carson), 615 North Second Street, Emmaus.

Jeanette PETERS Stauffer (Mrs. Edward), 851 Juniper Road, Hellertown. Private duty, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem.

Lydia RASH Smith, 715 Tilghman Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Kathryn RICE McKay (Mrs. John E.), 43 Amherst Place, Livingston, N. J.

Anna STERNER Seiwell, 22 North Ninth Street, Allentown. Priv-vate duty, Allentown Hospital.

Kathleen STRAWN Shellhammer, 720 North New Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

Charlotte TREXLER Mertz (Mrs. Joseph D.), Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo.

Ruth Elizabeth WEISEL, 444 East Broad Street, Quakertown. Graduate work, Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia; office nurse.

Mary WETHERHOLD Nickles (Mrs. Edward F.), 28 North 11th Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

Eleanor WINGLE DeEsch (Mrs. George), 528 South Second Street, Emmaus. Graduate work in orthopedic nursing.

Geraldine YODER Sechler (Mrs. Leland), 115 Smith Street, Top-ton.

1938

Vivian COOK Kaba (Mrs. William), 704 Broadway, Bethlehem.

Flora Jane DITCHFIELD, 1316 West Walnut Street, Shamokin. Army Nurse Corps, September 1941 to —, Captain; Army nurse, Valley Forge General Hospital, Phoenixville.

Ruth ENCKE Burin (Mrs. Charles), Church Street, Belford, N. J.

Catharine FALK Zenz (Mrs. Louis), 1312 North 25th Street, Allentown.

Agnes FREEBY Gerhart (Mrs. Homer), Seneca Park, Route 14, Box 704, Baltimore, Md.

Rae HAAS Rice (Mrs. Herbert), 374 Second Avenue, Phoenixville. Army Nurse Corps, 1941-1942, Second Lieutenant.

Marjorie Alice HALEY, 727 Whitehall Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, January 1943 to February 1946, First Lieutenant; industrial nurse, Arbogast and Bastian Inc.

Ruth HELD Laudenslager (Mrs. Robert C.), 917 North Sixth Street, Allentown.

Naomi HERZING Kidd (Mrs. Truman C.), 137 South Broad Street, Nazareth. Office nurse.

Alma KEHL Peters (Mrs. Paul A.), 423 Ridge Street, Emmaus.

Kathryn Marie KISTLER, 630 North 11th Street, Allentown. College nurse, Muhlenberg College.

Elizabeth KOONS Wigley (Mrs. Thomas E.), 1418 Hamilton Avenue, Trenton, N. J.

Mary KRATZER Keller (Mrs. Wilmer), 200 East Third Street, Bethlehem.

Thelma MASONHEIMER Waidelich, 902 North Seventh Street, Allentown. Staff nurse, Allentown State Hospital.

Hannah MORGENSTERN Hess (Mrs. Frank T.), 4143 East Cheltenham Avenue, Philadelphia.

Evelyn REX Lehr (Mrs. Wilfred), 646 North Ninth Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Pauline REX Dreisbach (Mrs. Willard A.), Route 3, Tamaqua.

Grace SCHAADT Eichler (Mrs. John R.), Laury’s Station. School nurse, North Whitehall Township.

Agnes STUCKLEY Edmondson (Mrs. Robert J.), 1538 Liberty Street, Allentown. Night supervisor, Allentown Hospital.

Charlotte TAYLOR Whittick (Mrs. John R.), 236 Roberta Avenue, Collingdale. Army Nurse Corps, April 1941 to February 1942, Second Lieutenant.

Norma WEAVER Bower (Mrs. William E.), 106 Chelsea Lane, Parkway Manor, Allentown.

Arlene WEIDNER Peters (Mrs. Herman A.), 2035 Liberty Street, Allentown.

1939

Eva Mae ALLEM, Milford, N. J. Navy Nurse Corps, Lieutenant; Navy nurse, U. S. Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Md.

Bernice ARBOGAST, 32 North Eighth Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, November 1944 to March 1946, Second Lieutenant; private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Mildred BARRETT Eline (Mrs. Paul), 1815 Linden Street, Allentown.

Lois Reed BENSON, Route 1, East Berlin. Graduate work, University of Michigan, A.B.; Army Nurse Corps, September 1942 to March 1946, First Lieutenant; director of nursing, Annie M. Warner Hospital, Gettysburg.

Evelyn BOOCK Halsel (Mrs. Alvin B.), 1232 Campbell Road, Oklahoma City, Okla.

Anastasia Eleanor BYCOSKY, Route 1, Lehighton. Army Nurse

Corps, January 1943 to November 1945, May 1948 to--, First

Lieutenant; Army nurse, Valley Forge General Hospital.

Ruth CORRIGAN Croll (Mrs. Elwood), 2803 Fair Acres, Allentown. Graduate work, Cook County School of Nursing, Chicago, 111.; private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Elizabeth DAVIS Sassaman (Mrs. John J.), 1412 Hamilton Street, Allentown.

Celia DOMBROSKI Cavillani, 364 East Main Street, Nanticoke.

Thelora DULLENKOPF Bliss (Mrs. John W.), 834 Media Street, Bethlehem.

Margaret GREENAWALT Schumacher (Mrs. George), 4622 Har-tel Street, Philadelphia. Navy Nurse Corps, January 1942 to October 1942, Ensign; Army Nurse Corps, September 1943 to December 1945, First Lieutenant.

Helen HACKER Geissler (Mrs. Glen), 1615 West Broad Street, Bethlehem. Graduate work, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.; private duty.

Lillian HAWK Rash (Mrs. Walter), 6631 North Fairhill Street, Philadelphia.

Cathryn HOHE Steckel (Mrs. Robert F.), 3271/^ North Lumber Street, Allentown.

Jessie JONES Reppert (Mrs. Charles I.), 121 North Third Street, Hamburg.

Amelia KNIFF Davies (Mrs. Willard J.), 1627 Wyoming Avenue, Forty-Fort.

Theda KRAUSS Laubach (Mrs. Robert A.), Orefield, Route 1. Army Nurse Corps, June 1942 to June 1944, Second Lieutenant.

Dorothy KRUM Burkhart (Mrs. Jack), 234 North 16th Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Ruth LEHMAN, 817 Jackson Street, Allentown. Assistant head nurse, Allentown Hospital.

Sallie MARSH Gerhart (Mrs. Homer C.), 120 Washington Avenue, North Wales.

Anna PEELMAN Thomas, Box 77, Kimberton.

Elizabeth PELLAND Kirkpatrick (Mrs. Eugene H.), 841 South Pike Avenue, Allentown. Private duty.

Alma Helen RASH, 1986 Harold Avenue, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Fayetta SEARFASS Ivor (Mrs. Michael), 330 West Minnezona Avenue, Phoenix, Ariz. Private duty.

Arlene Eva SERFASS, 612 Hanover Avenue, Allentown. Office nurse.

Cleo SHAFFER Rex (Mrs. John A.), Ashfield.

Pauline STOUT Yerg (Mrs. Lindley N.), 126 East Hamilton Avenue, State College. Graduate work in obstetrics.

Mary TROYAN Krause, Cheshire Road, Route 2, Waterbury, Conn. Graduate work, Waterbury Hospital.

Margaret UHLER Wilson (Mrs. G. Woodrow), Jonesboro, Me. Army Nurse Corps, December 1942 to April 1945, First Lieutenant, Bronze Star.

Catherine WALLACAVAGE Walker, 32 North Eighth Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, November 1944 to March 1946, First Lieutenant; private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Elizabeth WARD Metzger, 424 North Jerome Street, Allentown.

Dorothy WEIDA Moyer (Mrs. Forrest), 227^4 North 17th Street, Allentown.

Alma WUCHTER Holland (Mrs. Steward A.), 234 North 12th Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

1940

Lydia ANDRES Graner (Mrs. Howard), 4 Grandview Avenue, Keansport, N. J.

Evelyn ARNER Mease (Mrs. Paul W.), 41 North Spring Garden Avenue, Nutley, N. J.

Alice BAILEY Griffin (Mrs. Donald), 11826 Camden Avenue, Detroit, Mich.

Alberta BERNATITUS, 344 Battle Street, Exeter. Army Nurse Corps, First Lieutenant; staff nurse, Veterans Administration Hospital, Lebanon.

Lila Katharine BITTENBENDER, 633 Main Street, Red Hill. Army Nurse Corps (Reserve), July 1941 to January 1946, Captain; community nurse, Upper Perkiomen Valley.

Annamay BOWEN Schneider (Mrs. Laurence R.), 100 South Third Street, Wilmington, N. C. Graduate work, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.

Mary BOYER Fountain (Mrs. Wendell), Box 109, Route 1, Emmaus. Graduate work, Columbia University.

Margaret BRIMBLE Sharpe (Mrs. C. J.), 20 East Ruddle Street, Coaldale.

Jane CALLEN Foster (Mrs. Robert), 1837 Milton Street, Northbrook, 111. Graduate work, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.

Agnes CAMPBELL Higgins (Mrs. Harold), 3301 Highland Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.; private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Ruth CROWE Kline (Mrs. William), 413 Dewey Avenue, Bartlesville, Okla.

Frances DeLONG Geiger (Mrs. Orlando E.), 32 Spruce Street, Topton. Private duty.

Ruth FRANKENFIELD Kistler (Mrs. Harland G.), Church Street, Fogelsville.

Jeanne FREY Van Wye (Mrs. Benjamin), 649 Evergreen Street, Emmaus.

Pauline HEBERLING Snyder (Mrs. Edgar F.), 1531 Allen Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Willetta HILDENBRAND Thatcher (Mrs. Franklin R.), 602 West Union Blvd., Bethlehem. Army Nurse Corps, December

1942    to February 1946, First Lieutenant.

Marion HOPKINS, 41 South 14th Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Asbury College, Kentucky, B.A., and Columbia Bible College, Columbia, S. C., M.A. in Biblical Education; medical missionary, China Inland Mission, Shanghai, China.

Florence Gloria JARRETT, 2863 Austin Street, Corpus Christi, Texas. Army Nurse Corps, July 1941 to December 1945, First Lieutenant; Graduate work, Delmar College, Corpus Christi, Texas; college student.

Margaret Ann KABANA, 16 Catawissa Street, Tuscarora. Army Nurse Corps, February 1942 to —, First Lieutenant; Army nurse, Walter Reed General Hospital, Washington, D.C.

Hilda KEIM Schultz (Mrs. Theodore), 317 South Chestnut Street, Mount Carmel.

Ruth KLINE Eckert (Mrs. Tony), 113 South Ninth Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Elsie Ada LAY, Route 1, Sellersville. Navy Nurse Corps, August

1943    to April 1946, Lieutenant, junior grade; graduate work, Moravian College for Women; student medical technician, Allentown Hospital.

Arlene Ethel LEISER, 1518 Allen Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, July 1941 to December 1945, First Lieutenant; nurse, junior grade, Veterans Administration Hospital, Lebanon.

Catherine LESHER Knappenberger (Mrs. Fred), 215 American Street, Fullerton.

Jeanne LIENHARD Young (Mrs. William), Box 34, Walnutport. Graduate work, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.; private duty, Coronado Hospital, Coronado, Calif.

Margaret McQUILKEN Weider (Mrs. George R.), 1950 Allen Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Madeline MOYER LeVan (Mrs. Charles H.), 96 West Broad Street, Bethlehem.

Eleanor PERRY Noveral (Mrs. Joseph), 134 East Green Street, Nanticoke.

Mary PORAMBO Miller (Mrs. Richard), 1522i/2 Chew Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Eleanor ROMAN Van Dyke, Route 3, Scholl Avenue, Bethlehem.

Ruth ROWAN Wallace (Mrs. Robert B.), 1629 Turner Street, Allentown. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania, B.S.; surgical supervisor, Presbyterian Hospital, Philadelphia.

Jean SCHEIRER Hoffman (Mrs. William), 647 Main Street, Egypt. General and private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Sallie SERFASS Heller (Mrs. Norman F.), 902 South Poplar Street, Allentown.

Kathryn STERNER Slick (Mrs. Dean C.), 411 East Ettwein Street, Bethlehem.

Betty VERAZIN Hylton (Mrs. Harry), 212 South Brevard Street, Tampa, Fla. Army Nurse Corps, October 1942 to October 1945, First Lieutenant; graduate work, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.

Mary WEAVER Tranbaugh, 752 North Sixth Street, Allentown.

Kathleen Eleanor YIENGST, 1011 Hamilton Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, July 1941 to January 1946, Second Lieutenant; staff nurse, Veterans Administration Hospital, Lebanon.

1941

Olga Emma BAILEY, Schnecksville. Army Nurse Corps, Valley Forge General Hospital, Phoenixville, Second Lieutenant.

June BANKS Leh (Mrs. Raymond), 523 Chew Street, Allentown. Head nurse, Allentown Hospital.

Pearl BIEGE Gallagher (Mrs. William), 255 East South Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Eva BUNDY Readinger (Mrs. Donald), 14 East Main Street, Macungie. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Marjorie BUTZ Stauffer. Deceased.

Grace COSTENBADER Frable (Mrs. Norman F.), Route 2, Northampton.

Betty DEAN Falk (Mrs. Roy), 335 North West Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Tillie FEDORSHA Timony, 258 Central Avenue, Orange, N. J.

Velma GERHART Oswald (Mrs. Tilghman), Orefield. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Carlene GESKE Lauchnor (Mrs. Mark A.), 171 South Third Street, Lehighton.

Caroline GRESSLER Mentzer (Mrs. Raymond E., Jr.), 335 North West Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Barbara HALL Chamberlain (Mrs. Nugent F.), 1708 Utah Street, Baytown, Tex. Army Nurse Corps, June 1942 to October 1945, First Lieutenant.

A. Louise HARDING, Main Street, Bath. Graduate work, Muhlenberg College, B.S. in Ed.; surgical supervisor, Allentown Hospital.

Martha HENSINGER Lauchnor (Mrs. Paul K.), Route 1, Slatington.

Helen KENYA Toler, 545 Cleveland Street, Allentown. Navy Nurse Corps, January 1943 to April 1947, Lieutenant, senior grade; private duty, Dallas, Tex.

Irene KOZLOWSKI Weil (Mrs. Russell G. E.), 742 North Fifth Street, Allentown. Office nurse.

Marvalene KRAMER Gilbert (Mrs. John C>| 1018 South Sixth Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Catharine KRESSLEY Mimlitsch (Mrs. William R.), 1034 Lehigh Street, Allentown. Private duty and relief office nurse.

Anna LAKITSKY Susavage (Mrs. Frank B.), 4336 Market Street, Philadelphia.

Clara LINDNER Miles (Mrs. John), 1021 East Center Street, Mahanoy City.

Anna Mae McCABE, 831 North Seventh Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, May 1942 to —, Captain; charge nurse, Valley Forge General Hospital, Phoenixville.

Arlene MADOUSE Stone (Mrs. Kenneth E.), P.O. Box 55, Qua-kake.

Anne OKAL, Delano. Graduate work, Muhlenberg College and University of Pennsylvania; assistant science instructor, Allentown Hospital School of Nursing.

Cecelia ONDECK Edwards (Mrs. Thomas J.), 1004 Van Ness Street, San Antonio, Tex. Army Nurse Corps, May 1942 to November 1945, First Lieutenant, Bronze Star; general duty, Nix Memorial Hospital.

Eleanor PARSONS Pettit, 650 Hamilton Street, New Brunswick, N.J.

Alice PETER Eaton (Mrs. James A. D.), 1327 South 20th Street, Birmingham, Ala.

Ruth REIFSNYDER Hoch (Mrs. H. A.), A-15 Brentshire Village, Pittsburgh. Private duty, Pittsburgh hospitals.

Arlene REX Greenawald (Mrs. Martin), 743 Waverly Avenue, Fullerton.

Althea SANTEE Snyder (Mrs. Merritt), 2109 Hanover Avenue, Allentown.

Eleanor SEMMEL Evans (Mrs. Lloyd G.), Slatington, Route 1.

Laura SHIVE Gallie (Mrs. William), Walnut Street, Sellersville.

Esther SMITH Strohmeier (Mrs. Aaron), 853 Scott Street, Stroudsburg.

Elizabeth SNYDER Hawley (Mrs. John), Route 3, Piqua, Ohio. Army Nurse Corps, June 1942 to November 1942, Second Lieutenant; private duty.

Julia SNYDER Prettyman (Mrs. W. O.), South Willow Street, Fleetwood. Army Nurse Corps, September 1942 to December

1945, First Lieutenant.

Cecelia SPIRE Ayers (Mrs. Cletus E.), 334 North Franklin Street, Allentown.

Helen STAPLETON Presnell, 621 Arlington Street, Tamaqua. Navy Nurse Corps, July 1943 to August 1944, Ensign; executive secretary, American Cancer Society.

Helen SULKOSKY Slenker, 212 North Sixth Street, Allentown.

Mary TOSH Fondarvest (Mrs. Valentine), 231 West Street, Bethlehem.

Agnes TROXELL Paist (Mrs. Wistar B.), 740 North Eighth Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, May 1942 to June 1946, First Lieutenant; student, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Margaret VARGO Gutekunst (Mrs. Walter G.), 4520 Princeton Avenue, Philadelphia.

Mary VRABEL Franklin (Mrs. Warren D.), 207 Williamson Road, Stow, Ohio. Navy Nurse Corps, October 1942 to December 1944, Ensign.

Milla WEIDNER Markos (Mrs. John D.), 1336 Hamilton Street, Allentown. Navy Nurse Corps, 1943 to 1946, Lieutenant; office nurse.

Helen WILLIAMS Chamberlain, 817 Plymouth Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Virginia WOLFE Smith (Mrs. Kenneth R.), 21 East Avenue, Atlantic Highlands, N. J.

Agnes ZOSHAK Ritter (Mrs. Francis F.), 1415 Lehigh Parkway, Allentown.

1942

Gladys BAUER Eck (Mrs. Russel J.), 18 East Main Street, Macun-gie.

Sarah BAUER Erich (Mrs. John R.), 130 East Main Street, Macun-gie.

Beatrice BOOCK Black (Mrs. James B.), 1740 N.W. 17th Street, Oklahoma City, Okla. Army Nurse Corps, April 1943 to January 1946, First Lieutenant; graduate work, Oklahoma School of Pharmacy, Oklahoma University, Norman, Okla.

Elizabeth Lucille BRAY, 220 Princeton Avenue, Palmerton. Navy Nurse Corps, November 1942 to —, Lieutenant; flight nurse, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Madeline CONTINI Pfeiffer (Mrs. Warren T.), 2145 Eaton Avenue, Bethlehem. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Joyce DANKEL Taylor, 529 North Tenth Street, Allentown.

Bernice DAWE Brodt (Mrs. Ray H.), 11 Green Street, Nazareth.

Velma E. DONSCECZ, 1447]/^> Liberty Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Amy EISENHARD Tabor (Mrs. J. Carl), 218 South Washington Street, Boyertown.

Elizabeth FEGELY Dorward (Mrs. Richard), 935 Gordon Street, Allentown. General and private duty.

Evelyn Ann FLEMISH, Route 1, Wescosville. School nurse, South Whitehall Township.

Jean FOCHT Thierer (Mrs. Richard), 2510 South Fifth Street, Allentown.

Ardis Verletta GAUMER, 333 South Arlington Avenue, Colonial Park, Harrisburg. Army Nurse Corps, April 1943 to April 1946, First Lieutenant; private duty, Harrisburg hospitals.

Ruth GOHEEN Yutz (Mrs. Harold F.), 1213 West Minor Street, Emmaus. Office nurse.

Jean Elizabeth GRASLEY, 1516i/£ Allen Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Muhlenberg College and Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.; industrial nurse, Mack Manufacturing Corp.

Marie GUSHEN Herstine (Mrs. Richard O.), 530 Third Avenue, Bethlehem. Private duty, St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem.

Elizabeth HEFFNER Johnson (Mrs. Ralph B.), 620 Jennings Street, Endicott, N. Y. Army Nurse Corps, March 1943 to February 1946, First Lieutenant; nurse and receptionist.

Hazel HERBSTER Pabst, Box 442 Sqd. A, 4144th A.F.B.U., Muroc, Calif. Army Nurse Corps, July 1943 to July 1944, Second Lieutenant; general duty nurse, Station Hospital, Muroc, Calif.

Florence Irene HESS, Route 1, Riegelsville. Army Nurse Corps, April 1943 to February 1946, First Lieutenant, Bronze Star; general duty, Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, Mo.

Virginia KERN Eichman (Mrs. Robert V.), 726 Walnut Street, Allentown. Private duty.

Betty KLECKNER Wieder (Mrs. Lewis W.), 754 Pittston Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, March 1943 to February 1946, First Lieutenant; industrial nurse, Mack Manufacturing Corp.

Anna KRAYNAK Reimert, 627 North 12th Street, Allentown.

Mary LICHTENWALNER Kuhn (Mrs. Roger), 143 North Fifth Street, Emmaus. Navy Nurse Corps, October 1942 to January

1944, Ensign; outpatient department, Naval Hospital, Atlantic City, N. J.

Dorothea MACK Clooney (Mrs. Edward), 1037 Hanover Avenue, Allentown.

Laura MAHLON Hillegass (Mrs. Willis S.), 1609 Tilghman Street, Allentown.

Ruth MONTZ Stauffer (Mrs. Albert), Old Zionsville.

Elinore MORGAN Sell (Mrs. Harold W.), 1827 West Greenleaf Street, Allentown.

Nancy MOYER Herring (Mrs. Clifford F.), Route 1, Tamaqua. Army Nurse Corps, May 1943 to December 1945, First Lieutenant.

Lucille OSMUN Schneck (Mrs. E. G.), 322 West Maple Avenue, Langhorne. Graduate work, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.

Dorothy PELLAND Hontz (Mrs. Lloyd), 936 South Pike Avenue, Allentown.

Helen REINSMITH Gledhill, 1431 Palm Street, Reading.

Dorothy ROTH Yeager (Mrs. Donald M.), 303 North Ninth Street, Allentown.

Anna RYBNIKAR, 375 West Kline Avenue, Lansford. Graduate work, Margaret Hague Maternity Hospital; assistant head nurse, Margaret Hague Maternity Hospital, Jersey City, N. J.

Charlotte SMITH Shoemaker (Mrs. Lee S.), 1739 Main Street, Northampton.

Reba STEIGERWALT Conroy (Mrs. James J.), 1903 Tolson Avenue, Baltimore, Md. Army Nurse Corps, April 1943 to December 1945, First Lieutenant.

Arlene STOVER Kratzer (Mrs. Edward H. W.), 121 South 16th Street, Allentown. Graduate work in pediatrics.

Mary ULATOWSKI Brislin (Mrs. Thomas), 312 East Beaver Street, Bellefonte.

1943

Mary BEREZNAK Cerone (Mrs. Albert), 43 South Morrison Avenue, San Jose, Calif. Army Nurse Corps, July 1944 to April

1946, Second Lieutenant.

Rose BRONEY Gombert (Mrs. James), Route 2, Lehighton. Hotel proprietress.

Helen CAHOON Weida (Mrs. Philip G.), 120 North Fourth Street, Emmaus.

Betty CHILDS, Box 313, Wallace Street, Stroudsburg.

Elizabeth CHRISTMAN Huttenberger (Mrs. William M.), Route 6, Westminster, Md. Army Nurse Corps, November 1943 to October 1945, Second Lieutenant.

Dorothy COGLEY Lethco (Mrs. Fred), 220 East Bloss Street, Titusville. Army Nurse Corps, April 1944 to January 1946, First Lieutenant; private duty, Titusville Hospital.

Mary CONNARD Gresh, Route 1, Linden. Dispensary nurse, Laurelton State Village, Laurelton.

Helen Mary DABROWSKA, 112 South Catawissa Street, Mahanoy City. Office nurse, Allentown.

Dorothy DANKEL Strohl (Mrs. Roderick G., Sr.), Fogelsville. Navy Nurse Corps, September 1944 to February 1946, Ensign.

Elizabeth DeLONG Blaisdell (Mrs. Fillmore T.), 227 Beal Street, Hingham, Mass. Navy Nurse Corps, Tanuary 1944 to September

1944, Ensign.

Marian DeLONG Wieder (Mrs. Harry R.), 37 Sycamore Street, Macungie.

Frances DeWALT Roth, 111 Whitefield Street, Yoakum, Texas.

Ruth EVANS Orkin (Mrs. Seymour), 1238 East Centre Street, Mahanoy City.

Harriet FATZINGER Phillips (Mrs. Frederick), 209 Main Street, Walnutport.

Shirley FOWLER Schaeffer (Mrs. William H., Jr.) 1326 Club Avenue, Allentown.

Helen E. GAMULCEK, 349 Prospect Street, Phillipsburg, N. J. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania; doctor’s assistant, Easton.

Jean I. HOUSEKNECHT, 626 Walnut Street, Emmaus. Army Nurse Corps, June 1944 to August 1947, First Lieutenant; private duty, Bryn Mawr Hospital.

Marian HUBITSKY Merkel, 42 North Fifth Street, Allentown. Graduate work in surgical nursing; private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Eleanor KEHM Wadding (Mrs. Sam), 532 North 15th Street, Allentown. Army Nurse Corps, March 1945 to July 1947, First Lieutenant.

Anne KERR Utterman (Mrs. William F.), 2901 Denison Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. Graduate work, University of Utah; private duty.

Dorothy KRAFT Dengler (Mrs. Albert M.), 720 Park Avenue, Fullerton. Graduate work, Cedar Crest College, B.S.; obstetrical head nurse, Allentown Hospital.

Betty KRUEGER Roth (Mrs. George), 400 East Broad Street, Quakertown. Navy Nurse Corps, August 1944 to March 1945, Ensign.

Sare MOYER Shupp, 213 North Church Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Cedar Crest College, B.S.; general duty, Allentown Hospital.

Anna NEIDIG Muehlhauser (Mrs. William), 310 Franklin Street, Quakertown.

Lucille Mae NISSEN, 22 Center Street, Slatington. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Sophie Josephine PORAMBO, 17 East Walter Street, Summit Hill. Army Nurse Corps, May 1945 to July 1946, Second Lieutenant; private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Carrol Louise READINGER, 450 North Fourth Street, Allentown. Navy Nurse Corps, November 1944 to August 1946, Ensign; graduate work, Denver University; assistant, Insulin Clinic, Mount Airy Hospital, Colo.

Georgianna RESSLER Kichline, 235 High Street, Womelsdorf.

Jean ROTH Kemp (Mrs. Warren G. H.), 35 Fourth Street, Slatington. Army Nurse Corps; private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Jane RUHL Waters (Mrs. Willard W.), Route 3, Allentown. Navy Nurse Corps, March 1944 to January 1945, Ensign; private duty, Tupelo Hospital, Tupelo, Miss.

Anna SCHAFER Wieder (Mrs. Willard), 41 South Franklin Street, Allentown. General duty, Allentown Hospital.

Leanore SCHERER Balogh (Mrs. William), Main Street, Emerald. Army Nurse Corps, March 1945 to July 1945, Second Lieutenant.

Annabelle SCHREIBER Korpalski (Mrs. Charles), Zionsville. Army Nurse Corps, March 1945 to October 1945, Second Lieutenant.

Marion SELLERS Harris (Mrs. Lester K.), 1120 Highland Avenue, Bethlehem. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania.

Dorothy SHUBIAK, 5347 Wayne Avenue, Philadelphia. Army Nurse Corps, March 1945 to July 1946, Second Lieutenant; general duty, Allentown Hospital.

Ann SINCLAIR McNamara (Mrs. John R.), 908 Center Street, Bethlehem.

Elmyra SMITH Gable (Mrs. Lloyd C.), 26 South Howard Street, Allentown.

Jean Catherine SMITH, 726 Walnut Street, Allentown. Navy Nurse Corps, August 1944 to September 1946, Lieutenant, junior grade; general duty, Veterans Administration Hospital, Coral Gables, Fla.

Marian Catherine STOFFLET, 51 Birch Road, Winthrop, Mass. Navy Nurse Corps, January 1944 to January 1946, Ensign; office nurse, Boston, Mass.

Bernice TANSKI Hahn (Mrs. Carl L.), 337 North 16th Street, Allentown. Graduate work, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 111.

Thelma WACK Ashton (Mrs. Donald M.), 628 Terrace Avenue, Bethlehem. Army Nurse Corps, July 1944 to March 1946, First Lieutenant; nurse, 20th Station Hospital, Clark Air Base, Philippine Islands.

Emeline WAGNER Cliff (Mrs. William T.), 1204 West Broad Street, Bethlehem. Graduate work, University of Pennsylvania; private duty, St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethlehem.

June WARRICK Miller (Mrs. Delmer G.), 130 Kline Street, Bangor. Staff nurse, Peralta Hospital, Oakland, Calif.

Louise ZELLERS Keener, 726 Second Street, Catasauqua. Army Nurse Corps, November 1943 to January 1946, First Lieutenant; graduate work, University of Tennessee; charge nurse, Kennedy Hospital, Memphis, Tenn.

1944

Eleanor BACHMAN Kratzer (Mrs. John L.), 627 North 19th Street, Allentown.

Marjorie BALTHASER Hetherington (Mrs. Kenneth), 2346 South Fourth Street, Allentown. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Jean BASTIAN Davis (Mrs. Reynold R., Jr.), 3600 Hamilton Street, Allentown. General duty, Parkway Rest Home, Allentown.

Ethel BENNINGER Zimmerman (Mrs. Albert), 1118 Walnut Street, Berwick. General duty, Berwick Hospital.

Mary BIALIS, 218 First Street, Coaldale. Army Nurse Corps, May 1945 to May 1946, Second Lieutenant; charge nurse, Coaldale State Hospital.

Lillian Magdalene BOBBIN, 90 South Main Street, Mahanoy City. Private duty, Allentown Hospital.

Ruth CARLS Sechrist (Mrs. Rodney), 824% North Fifth Street, Allentown.

Mildred DAVIDSON Sweatlock (Mrs