Title

Change in Patient MELD-Na and Albumin Level From the Time of Celiac Disease Diagnosis to Six Months Later After Gluten-Free Diet.

Publication/Presentation Date

5-22-2020

Abstract

Background & aims Celiac disease (CD) is a multisystem disorder triggered by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals that may affect any organ system, including the liver. We evaluated a change in patient model for end-stage liver disease (MELD)-Na and albumin level from the time of celiac disease diagnosis to six months later, after implementing a gluten-free diet. Methods A retrospective study was conducted from January 1, 2006, to June 30, 2018. CD was diagnosed based on celiac antibodies and/or histopathological data. MELD-Na and albumin were calculated at the start of the gluten-free diet and six months later. Additional variables like gender, ethnicity, serum IgA level, serum IgG level, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type, and markers of end-stage liver disease were collected. Descriptive statistics, including means, were reported with the standard deviation for the continuous variables along with frequencies and percentages for all categorical variables. Results A total of 18 patients (55.6% male) were identified as having both cirrhosis and CD. The mean age at the time of celiac diagnosis was 53.6, and 94.4% were Caucasian. CD was diagnosed using celiac antibodies (100%) and histopathological data (44.4%). Most common celiac antibodies include anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (77.8%). End-stage liver disease markers like abdominal ascites (55.6%), variceal bleed (50.0%), acute or chronic kidney injury (16.7%), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (11.1%), hepatic encephalopathy (HE) (50.0%), spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) (5.6%), and liver transplant (0.0%) were seen. The mean baseline MELD-Na score was 11.8, and albumin was 3.5 at the time of celiac diagnosis and mean MELD-Na was 11.8, and albumin was 3.5 six months after a gluten-free diet. Conclusion It is difficult to conclude any exact relationship between change in MELD-Na score after gluten-free diet, but an improving trend is noted in patients with higher MELD-Na score such as 17 or higher. There is no change or worsening of MELD-Na score in patients with lower MELD-Na score. There was no change in mean MELD-Na and albumin level after gluten-free diet.

Volume

12

Issue

5

First Page

8237

Last Page

8237

ISSN

2168-8184

Disciplines

Diseases | Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

32582496

Peer Reviewed for front end display

Peer-Reviewed

Department(s)

Department of Medicine

Document Type

Article

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