Title

Nonfatal motor vehicle related injuries among deployed US Service members: Characteristics, trends, and risks for limb amputations.

Publication/Presentation Date

10-1-2019

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Motor vehicle-related (MVR) incidents are important causes of morbidity among deployed US service members (SMs). Nonbattle MVR injuries are usually similar to civilian MVR injuries, while battle MVR injuries are often unique due to the blast effects from precipitating explosive mechanisms. Our primary objective was to describe the characteristics and trends of nonfatal MVR injuries sustained by deployed US SMs. A second objective was to assess the association between mechanism of injury (i.e., explosive vs. nonexplosive) and limb amputation.

METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional analysis using data from the Department of Defense Trauma Registry collected from October 2001 to December 2018. Descriptive statistics were reported stratified by mechanism of injury (explosive vs. nonexplosive). The association between mechanism of injury and limb amputation was assessed using logistic regression models.

RESULTS: There were 3,119 US casualties who sustained nonfatal MVR injuries, 2,380 (76.3%) SMs sustained nonexplosive MVR injuries while 739 (23.7%) sustained explosive MVR injuries. Of all MVR casualties, 2,085 (66.9%) were in Iraq or Syria and 1034 (33.1%) in Afghanistan. The annual prevalence of nonfatal MVR battle casualties was highest in Iraq and Syria from 2003 to 2009 and Afghanistan from 2009 to 2014, ranging overall 15 to 50 MVR casualties per 1,000 wounded in action. There were 92 limb amputations associated with MVR incidents. Compared with nonexplosive MVR mechanisms, explosive MVR mechanisms had higher association with limb amputation (adjusted odds ratio, 2.6; confidence interval, 1.7-3.9), even after adjusting for injury year and Injury Severity Score (AOR, 2.1; confidence interval: 1.4-3.4).

CONCLUSION: Motor vehicle-related incidents are an important cause of injury in US military operations. Compared with nonexplosive MVR incidents, explosive MVR incidents result in more severe injuries, and have a higher associated risk of limb amputation. Continued efforts to improve injury prevention through protective equipment and medical training specific to MVR injuries are needed.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic and epidemiological study, Level III.

Volume

87

Issue

4

First Page

907

Last Page

914

ISSN

2163-0763

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

31589195

Department(s)

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Document Type

Article

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