Publication/Presentation Date

11-16-2014

Abstract

BACKGROUND: -Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is common and characterized by exercise intolerance and lack of proven effective therapies. Exercise training has been shown to be effective in improving cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in patients with systolic heart failure. In this meta-analysis, we aim to evaluate the effects of exercise training on CRF, quality of life and diastolic function in patients with HFPEF.

METHODS AND RESULTS: -Randomized controlled clinical trials that evaluated the efficacy of exercise training in patients with HFPEF were included in this meta-analysis. Primary outcome of the study was change in CRF (measured as change in peak oxygen uptake). Impact of exercise training on quality of life (estimated using Minnesota living with heart failure score), left ventricular systolic and diastolic function was also assessed. The study included 276 patients that were enrolled in 6 randomized controlled trials. In the pooled data analysis, HFPEF patients undergoing exercise training had significantly improved CRF (L/min) (Mean difference: 2.72; 95% CI: 1.79 to 3.65) and quality of life (Mean difference: -3.97; 95% CI: -7.21 to -0.72) as compared with the control group. However, no significant change was observed in the systolic function [Ejection Fraction - Weighted Mean difference (WMD): 1.26; 95% CI: -0.13% to 2.66%] or diastolic function [E/A - WMD: 0.08; 95% CI:-0.01 to 0.16] with exercise training in HFPEF patients.

CONCLUSIONS: -Exercise training in patients with HFPEF is associated with an improvement in CRF and quality of life without significant changes in left ventricular systolic or diastolic function.

Volume

8

Issue

1

First Page

33

Last Page

40

ISSN

1941-3297

Comments

This is also available through PubMed Central

Disciplines

Cardiology | Medical Sciences | Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

25399909

Department(s)

Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division

Document Type

Article

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