Title

The Impact of Mandated in-Hospital Coverage on Primary Cesarean Delivery Rates in a Large Nonuniversity Teaching Hospital.

Publication/Presentation Date

2-1-1995

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether attending physician call status affected the primary cesarean delivery rates of the resident or private services after institution of in-hospital coverage.

STUDY DESIGN: Data for the study year, during which in-hospital attending coverage was in place, were compared with those of the previous year, during which in-hospital attending coverage of residents was not in place. Birth records were analyzed retrospectively for physician and patient factors.

RESULTS: For the year before in-hospital coverage the institutional total cesarean rate was 24.9%, with a primary cesarean section rate of 17.6%. In the first year of coverage the total cesarean delivery was 21.7%, with a decrease in the primary rate to 15.3%. The resident service primary cesarean delivery rate was 10.6% during the study year, which was unchanged from 10.9% the prior year and did not contribute to the overall decrease. Conversely, the private service primary cesarean rate decreased from 18.0% in the prestudy year to 13.4% when the attending physician was on call in the hospital but remained higher at 17.5% when the attending physician was on call not in the hospital.

CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital attending physician coverage lowered individual attending physicians' private service primary cesarean rates. Resident service primary cesarean rates were lower than private service and were unaffected by the initiation of in-hospital coverage.

Volume

172

Issue

2 Pt 1

First Page

637

Last Page

642

ISSN

0002-9378

Disciplines

Obstetrics and Gynecology

PubMedID

7856698

Department(s)

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents

Document Type

Article