Title

Evidence for the Efficacy of TRAM Flap Delay in a Rat Model.

Publication/Presentation Date

11-1-1995

Abstract

The dilemma in selecting a variant of the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap for autogenous tissue breast reconstruction is to balance maximal flap perfusion against the sacrifice of abdominal-wall integrity. A surgical delay has been suggested as one very simple fascia-sparing technique that simultaneously augments flap volume, but no randomized clinical studies have been performed to prove whether there is any benefit whatsoever following such a maneuver. Because large groups of nearly identical subjects may be more readily available for comparison in an animal model, the rat TRAM flap provides an inexpensive method to further investigate the delay phenomenon in this setting. Staged procedures were performed in 15 Sprague-Dawley rats initially causing a delay by division of one or both dominant vessels (cranial epigastric) supplying the rectus abdominis muscles. Either 2 or 4 weeks later, TRAM flaps were elevated based only on the subservient (caudal epigastric) pedicle. A control group of 7 rats with immediate formation of a TRAM flap had a mean survival of 46.3 +/- 15.37 percent of their original flap surface area. After a 2-week delay, viability was 50.2 +/- 17.54 percent for ipsilateral and 39.4 +/- 7.57 percent for flaps with prior bilateral dominant pedicle division. Neither was significantly different from control (p = 0.68 and 0.38, respectively). However, the ipsilateral 4-week delayed group had 67.8 +/- 8.96 percent flap survival, which represented a significant enhancement when compared with the undelayed control TRAM flaps (p < 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Volume

96

Issue

6

First Page

1351

Last Page

1357

ISSN

0032-1052

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences | Other Medical Specialties | Plastic Surgery | Surgery

PubMedID

7480233

Department(s)

Department of Surgery, Department of Surgery Faculty

Document Type

Article