Title

Recent Advances in Acellular Regenerative Tissue Scaffolds.

Publication/Presentation Date

1-1-2015

Abstract

The management of chronic wounds is a considerable challenge for foot and ankle surgeons. The well-established tenets of adequate vascular supply, debridement with eradication of infection, and offloading must be employed in the management of all extremity wounds. Regenerative scaffolds are a viable means of reestablishing a favorable wound environment. The matrix facilitates cell migration, chemoattraction, angiogenesis, wound bed granulation, and expedited wound closure. Although studies have demonstrated success with acellular matrices, a multimodal approach should always be employed to improve healing success. Negative pressure wound therapy, compression, offloading, and antibiotics are advocated to improve outcomes. Acellular graft selection requires a multifactorial analysis, taking into consideration the specific patient and wound characteristics as well as the differences between acellular matrices. Patient age, comorbidities, activity level, and ability to comply with protocol as well as wound etiology, duration, depth, surface area, exudate, bacterial burden, location, vascular status, ischemic status, and presentation are all critical components. To effectively choose a matrix, the clinician must have a comprehensive understanding of the products available and the data validating their use. The mechanisms by which the acellular matrix accelerates wound healing and increases the likelihood of wound healing continue to be investigated. However, it is clear that these acellular biologic tissue scaffolds are incorporating into the host tissue, with resultant revascularization and cellular repopulation. Moving forward, additional investigations examining the effectiveness of acellular biologic tissue scaffolds to improve healing in complex, nondiabetic wounds are warranted.

Volume

32

Issue

1

First Page

147

Last Page

159

ISSN

1558-2302

Disciplines

Other Medical Specialties | Surgery

PubMedID

25440425

Department(s)

Department of Surgery

Document Type

Article