Title

Comparing Tendinous and Ligamentous Ankle Pathology in Atraumatic Overweight and Nonoverweight Patients: A Comprehensive MRI Review.

Publication/Presentation Date

12-1-2014

Abstract

UNLABELLED: With the increased prevalence of obesity, there has been a parallel rise in musculoskeletal disorders. However, the effect of body mass index (BMI) on pathology of the hindfoot and ankle is scarcely understood. The purpose of the present report was to compare the number of tendinous and ligamentous pathologies within the hindfoot and ankle between overweight (BMI ≥ 25.00 kg/m(2)) and nonoverweight (BMI < 25.00 kg/m(2)) atraumatic patients. We hypothesized that overweight patients would demonstrate more tendinous and ligamentous pathologies compared with their nonoverweight counterparts. Five hundred consecutive magnetic resonance images were reviewed. One hundred eight patients met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Sixty-six patients were overweight and 42 patients were nonoverweight. Ninety-eight percent of overweight patients demonstrated pathology of a tendinous or ligamentous nature, whereas 62% of nonoverweight patients demonstrated pathology of a tendinous or ligamentous nature. Thus, the prevalence of pathology was 1.59 times higher among overweight patients compared with nonoverweight patients. Moreover, controlling for age, overweight patients demonstrated approximately twice as many tendinous and ligamentous pathologies compared with nonoverweight patients (adjusted mean ± SD = 4.44 ± 2.14 vs 1.98 ± 2.07, respectively), which was statistically significantly different (P < .001). To definitively assess causation and the clinical evolution of hindfoot and ankle pathology, prospective, longitudinal cohort studies are warranted.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Diagnostic, Level III: Case series.

Volume

7

Issue

6

First Page

449

Last Page

456

ISSN

1938-7636

Disciplines

Other Medical Specialties | Surgery

PubMedID

25005703

Peer Reviewed for front end display

Peer-Reviewed

Department(s)

Department of Surgery

Document Type

Article