Title

The Economy in Autologous Tissue Transfer: Part 1. The Kiss Flap Technique.

Publication/Presentation Date

3-1-2016

Abstract

BACKGROUND: All reconstructive microsurgeons realize the need to improve aesthetic and functional donor-site outcomes. A "kiss" flap design concept was developed to increase the surface area of skin flap coverage while minimizing donor-site morbidity.

METHODS: The main goal of the kiss flap technique is to harvest multiple skin paddles that are smaller than those raised with traditional techniques, to minimize donor-site morbidity. These smaller flap components are then sutured to each other, or said to kiss each other side-by-side, to create a large, wide flap. The skin paddles in the kiss technique can be linked to one another by a variety of native intrinsic vascular connections, by additional microanastomosis, or both. This technique can be widely applied to both free and pedicle flaps, and essentially allows for the reconstruction of a large defect while providing the easy primary closure of a smaller donor-site defect.

RESULTS: According to their origin of blood supply, kiss flaps are classified into three styles and five types. All of the different types of kiss flaps are unique in both flap design and harvest technique. Most kiss flaps are based on common flaps already familiar to the reconstructive surgeon.

CONCLUSIONS: The basis of the kiss flap design concept is to convert multiple narrow flaps into a single unified flap of the desired greater width. This maximizes the size of the resulting flap and minimizes donor-site morbidity, as a direct linear closure is usually possible.

CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, V.

Volume

137

Issue

3

First Page

1018

Last Page

1030

ISSN

1529-4242

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences | Other Medical Specialties | Surgery

PubMedID

26910687

Department(s)

Department of Surgery, Department of Surgery Faculty

Document Type

Article