Publication/Presentation Date

1-1-2020

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Targeted temperature management (TTM) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has been recommended in international guidelines since 2005. The TTM-trial published in 2013 showed no difference in survival or neurological outcome for patients randomised to 33 °C or 36 °C, and many hospitals have changed practice. The optimal utilization of TTM is still debated. This study aimed to analyse if a difference in temperature goal was associated with outcome in an unselected international registry population.

METHODS: This is a retrospective observational study based on a prospective registry - the International Cardiac Arrest Registry 2. Patients were categorized as receiving TTM in the lower range at 32-34 °C (TTM-low) or at 35-37 °C (TTM-high). Primary outcome was good functional status defined as cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1-2 at hospital discharge and secondary outcome was adverse events related to TTM. A logistic regression model was created to evaluate the independent effect of temperature by correcting for clinical and demographic factors associated with outcome.

RESULTS: Of 1710 patients included, 1242 (72,6%) received TTM-low and 468 (27,4%) TTM-high. In patients receiving TTM-low, 31.3% survived with good outcome compared to 28.8% in the TTM-high group. There was no significant association between temperature and outcome (p = 0.352). In analyses adjusted for baseline differences the OR for a good outcome with TTM-low was 1.27, 95% CI (0.94-1.73). Haemodynamic instability leading to discontinuation of TTM was more common in TTM-low.

CONCLUSIONS: No significant difference in functional outcome at hospital discharge was found in patients receiving lower- versus higher targeted temperature management.

Volume

146

First Page

229

Last Page

236

ISSN

1873-1570

Disciplines

Cardiology

PubMedID

31706964

Department(s)

Cardiology Division

Document Type

Article

Included in

Cardiology Commons

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