Title

Impact of acute postoperative limb ischemia after cardiac and thoracic aortic surgery.

Publication/Presentation Date

5-1-2018

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Acute limb ischemia (ALI) is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Although ALI after cardiac surgery is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, there are no robust, controlled analyses of the risk factors and outcomes of ALI in this setting. We aimed to identify risk factors for and to delineate outcomes after ALI in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on patients undergoing cardiac surgery at our institution between 2002 and 2012.

RESULTS: Between 2002 and 2012, there were 11,343 patients who underwent major open cardiac surgery, with 156 cases of ALI for an incidence of 1.4%. In a multivariable model, significant risk factors for ALI included body surface area (odds ratio [OR], 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18-0.92), current smoking status (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.3-3.7), peripheral arterial disease (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.6-3.7), nonelective operative status (OR, 1.9-5.0; 95% CI, 1.2-19.7), use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 2.5-11.6) or intra-aortic balloon pump (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 2.9-7.5), and valve operation (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1-4.0). There were 105 (67%) patients who developed ALI who required an operation, and 27 (17%) required an amputation on the index admission. ALI was associated with a significant reduction in long-term survival (hazard ratio, 3.72; 95% CI, 2.97-4.65; P < .0001).

CONCLUSIONS: ALI is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and it is also associated with reduced long-term survival. Those patients with the risk factors described require extra vigilance to limit the risk of ALI and should be managed in accordance with the patient's overall clinical condition and goals of care.

Volume

67

Issue

5

First Page

1530

Last Page

1536

ISSN

1097-6809

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

29242071

Department(s)

Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division

Document Type

Article

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