Title

Infarct restraint to limit adverse ventricular remodeling.

Publication/Presentation Date

2-1-2011

Abstract

The left ventricular response to a myocardial infarction is a complex biomechanical process that is only beginning to be understood. Infarct expansion (stretching) is an immediate and progressive phenomenon that is known to initiate and sustain the ventricular dilatation and global loss of contractile function that leads to symptomatic heart failure. Limitation of infarct expansion has, therefore, been identified as a potential therapeutic goal that could reduce the morbidity and cost associated with adverse infarction-induced ventricular remodeling and the symptomatic heart failure that results from it. This review will present experimental work that demonstrates the central importance of infarct expansion to the remodeling process as well as proof-of-concept studies that establish the efficacy of early mechanical infarct restraint for limiting ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). Ventricular restraint with polymeric mesh materials (wraps) placed early after MI will be discussed. Data supporting the use of injected acellular biomaterials to alter infarct material properties (stiffness) and geometry (thickness) will also be presented. This approach has been shown to be effective in our laboratory and others in limiting post-infarction remodeling and represents a potential means for limiting infarct expansion early after MI via minimally invasive catheter-based technology.

Volume

4

Issue

1

First Page

73

Last Page

81

ISSN

1937-5395

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

21161462

Department(s)

Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division

Document Type

Article

Share

COinS