Publication/Presentation Date

12-1-2022

Abstract

Atrial septal defects (ASD) caused by traumatic events, specifically blunt cardiac trauma, are considered an infrequent occurrence, yet their true prevalence has been difficult to ascertain. The general lack of knowledge is likely due to the pathology being severely understudied. We present the case of a 21-year-old male who was diagnosed with ASD following a motor vehicle accident. Initial assessment utilizing the point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) technique - focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) was found to be negative for free intraperitoneal or pericardial fluid. Subsequent computed tomography displayed multiple injuries but agreed with the FAST exam findings of no fluid within the abdomen or pericardium. Later in the patient's care a dedicated POCUS transthoracic echocardiogram was performed which identified right sided heart dilatation. The patient was managed in the intensive care unit (ICU) for an extensive period but recovered sufficiently to be discharged. The plan was to repair the ASD on a non-emergent basis. This case highlights the importance and diagnostic utility of bedside POCUS.

Categories: Emergency Medicine.

Volume

17

Issue

12

First Page

4546

Last Page

4549

ISSN

1930-0433

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

36193272

Department(s)

Department of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine Faculty, Department of Emergency Medicine Residents, Department of Surgery, USF-LVHN SELECT Program, USF-LVHN SELECT Program Students

Document Type

Article

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