Title

Developments in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the skin: a rising unmet need.

Publication/Presentation Date

1-1-2014

Abstract

Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (SCCS) is a common malignancy with potentially devastating consequences in patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Its rising incidence, primarily a result of an aging population and increased ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure, characterize an emerging unmet need. A firm understanding of the biology of this disease, likely distinct from that of other squamous malignancies because of the influence of UV radiation, is necessary in the evaluation of treatment paradigms. Careful recognition of high-risk features pertaining to tumor and host characteristics is paramount to proper management. However, a lack of standardization in guidelines in this regard creates a challenge for physicians. Questions persist regarding additional evaluation and treatment for advanced disease such as the roles for sentinel lymph node biopsy and the adjuvant use of radiation and chemotherapy. With respect to advanced disease, multiple combinations of chemotherapy have been tested with variable success, but no rigorous randomized studies have been conducted. In addition, EGFR inhibitors such as cetuximab and erlotinib have displayed antitumor activity and as such, warrant further investigation. In sum, the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic SCCS is a ripe area for clinical investigation. This article summarizes the current understanding of disease biology and emerging questions in the management of this disease.

First Page

397

Last Page

404

ISSN

1548-8756

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

24857130

Department(s)

Department of Medicine

Document Type

Article

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