Title

Percutaneous cryoablation for papillary muscle ventricular arrhythmias after failed radiofrequency catheter ablation.

Publication/Presentation Date

12-1-2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias (VA) from the papillary muscles (PM) is challenging due to limited catheter stability and contact on the PMs with their anatomic complexity and mobility.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of cryoablation as an adjunctive therapy for PM VAs when radiofrequency (RF) ablation has failed.

METHODS: We evaluated a retrospective series of patients who underwent cryoablation for PM VAs when RF ablation had failed. The decision to switch to cryoablation was at the operator's discretion when intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) suggested that cryoablation might be more effective in achieving catheter stability and energy delivery.

RESULTS: Sixteen patients underwent cryoablation of PM VAs between 2014 and 2016 after RF ablation was unsuccessful. VAs originated from the anterolateral left ventricle (LV) PM (six patients), posterolateral LV PM (six patients), and right ventricle PM (four patients). VAs were predominantly frequent premature ventricular complexes (PVCs); however, patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia and PVC-triggered VF were also represented. Fifteen of the 16 patients were treated with cryoablation; in one patient, a procedural complication with retrograde aortic access precluded treatment. In all patients treated with cryoablation, contact and stability was confirmed with ICE to be superior to the RF catheter, and there was acute and long-term elimination of VAs.

CONCLUSION: Cryoablation is a useful adjunctive therapy in ablation of PM VAs, providing excellent procedural outcomes even when RF ablation has failed. Cryoablation catheters are less maneuverable than RF ablation catheters and care is required to avoid complications.

Volume

29

Issue

12

First Page

1654

Last Page

1663

ISSN

1540-8167

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

30106213

Department(s)

Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division

Document Type

Article

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