Title

Aspirin-Mediated Reset of Preeclamptic Placental Stem Cell Transcriptome - Implication for Stabilized Placental Function.

Publication/Presentation Date

12-1-2022

Abstract

Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disease, occurring in ~ 2-10% of all pregnancies. PE is associated with increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, hypertension, proteinuria, disrupted artery remodeling, placental ischemia and reperfusion, and inflammation. The mechanism of PE pathogenesis remains unresolved explaining limited treatment. Aspirin is used to reduce the risk of developing PE. This study investigated aspirin's effect on PE-derived placenta mesenchymal stem cells (P-MSCs). P-MSCs from chorionic membrane (CM), chorionic villi, membranes from the maternal and amniotic regions, and umbilical cord were similar in morphology, phenotype and multipotency. Since CM-derived P-MSCs could undergo long-term passages, the experimental studies were conducted with this source of P-MSCs. Aspirin (1 mM) induced significant functional and transcriptomic changes in PE-derived P-MSCs, similar to healthy P-MSCs. These include cell cycle quiescence, improved angiogenic pathways, and immune suppressor potential. The latter indicated that aspirin could induce an indirect program to mitigate PE-associated inflammation. As a mediator of activating the DNA repair program, aspirin increased p53, and upregulated genes within the basic excision repair pathway. The robust ability for P-MSCs to maintain its function with high dose aspirin contrasted bone marrow (M) MSCs, which differentiated with eventual senescence/aging with 100 fold less aspirin. This difference cautions how data from other MSC sources are extrapolated to evaluate PE pathogenesis. Dysfunction among P-MSCs in PE involves a network of multiple pathways that can be restored to an almost healthy functional P-MSC. The findings could lead to targeted treatment for PE.

Volume

18

Issue

8

First Page

3066

Last Page

3082

ISSN

2629-3277

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

35908144

Department(s)

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Document Type

Article

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