Publication/Presentation Date

10-1-2009

Abstract

The goal of biologic resurfacing is to provide a smooth joint surface with a low coefficient of friction, which allows the joint to function with near normal biomechanics, as well as provide intermittent pressure, to the subchondral and cancellous bone. This unique combination often results in the formation of a "neocartilage-like" structure that can reduce pain and restore biomechanics. As well as giving a brief history of cutis arthroplasty, this article describes cases in which the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joint underwent biologic resurfacing, with a 2-year postoperative follow up.

Volume

26

Issue

4

First Page

633

Last Page

645

ISSN

1558-2302

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

19778693

Department(s)

Department of Surgery

Document Type

Article

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