Publication/Presentation Date

2-1-2007

Abstract

Envenomation from cobra bites causes major morbidity and mortality in Asia and Africa but rarely in the United States. We describe two patients bitten by the Asiatic Cobra (Naja Kaouthia)--both successfully treated in the emergency department. Patient 1 was a 23-year-old woman bitten in the buttock by her cobra. Examination demonstrated two puncture wounds. She developed cranial neuropathy, respiratory failure, and coagulopathy 10 h later, necessitating endotracheal intubation and polyvalent antivenom administration. The patient recovered fully with minimal wound necrosis. Patient 2, a 44-year-old man, was bitten on the hand by his cobra. Examination revealed a puncture wound with progressive swelling. Edrophonium and monovalent antivenom were administered, and he recovered uneventfully. These cases emphasize the varied clinical presentations of the Asiatic cobra. Patient 1 developed delayed neurotoxicity, respiratory failure, and hematotoxicity with minimal wound necrosis, whereas Patient 2 experienced a more typical clinical course.

Volume

32

Issue

2

First Page

171

Last Page

174

ISSN

0736-4679

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

17307627

Department(s)

Toxicology Division, Department of Emergency Medicine Faculty, Department of Emergency Medicine

Document Type

Article

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