Publication/Presentation Date

2-1-2022

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Driving an automobile requires the ability to turn the neck laterally. Anecdotally, patients with multilevel fusions often complain about restricted turning motion. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) on driving disability improvement at 10-year follow-up after a 2-level procedure.

METHODS: In the original randomized controlled trial, patients with cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy at 2 levels underwent CDA or ACDF. The driving disability question from the Neck Disability Index was rated from 0 to 5 years preoperatively and up to 10 years postoperatively. Severity of driving disability was categorized into "none" (score 0), "mild" (1 or 2), and "severe" (3, 4, or 5). Score and severity were compared between groups.

RESULTS: Out of 397 patients, 148 CDA and 118 ACDF patients had 10-year follow-up. Driving disability scores were not different between the groups preoperatively (CDA: 2.65; ACDF: 2.71,

CONCLUSION: In patients with cervical radiculopathy/myelopathy and 2-level disease, CDA provided greater improvements in driving disability as compared with ACDF at 10-year follow-up. This is the first report of its kind. This finding may be attributable to preservation of motion associated with CDA.

CLINICAL RELEVENCE: This study provides valuable information regarding the improvement of driving disability after both CDA and ACDF. It demonstrates that both procedures result in significant improvements, with CDA resulting in even better improvements than ACDF, up to 10 year follow-up.

Volume

16

Issue

1

First Page

95

Last Page

101

ISSN

2211-4599

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

PubMedID

35273107

Department(s)

Department of Surgery

Document Type

Article

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